A late surge in campaigning has improved the opposition's chances of victory as the economy stutters

A succession of bad elections this year in Africa – in Uganda, Gabon and Zambia – make the 7 December presidential and parliamentary elections in Ghana an important political marker for the region. In one of Africa's longest-established multi-party systems, where the electoral commission enjoys relatively high levels of trust, another set of successful elections in Ghana will send a positive signal.

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Good afternoon ladies and Gentlemen of the press. Thank you for coming on such short notice.

There’s a Ghanaian saying which goes like” Obaa a onim s3 onky3 wo aware ase no, otu bankye aa, ondua” akin to saying literally; that a lady whose days in her marital home are numbered, does not bother to re-plant uprooted cassava. 

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The past eight years have been a disaster for the people of Ghana. Governance standards have slipped and the economy has struggled, making life more difficult for every Ghanaian. Our country, once held up as the gold standard, has fallen markedly behind our peers.

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Other Stories

It is dangerous to blur the line between judges and politicians
Justice is truth in action. So said Benjamin Disraeli, who never had to deal with the European Court of Human Rights. Many modern politicians tend to a more jaundiced view. In their opinion, justice as dispensed by Strasbourg is not only blind but also, on occasion, deaf and dumb. The Euro judges, in their critics’ eyes, are an obstacle to British self-determination. Today, the Strasbourg court will prove or disprove such preconceptions in a ruling on whether extraditing alleged extremists to the United States would violate their human rights. The potential deportees include Abu Hamza, the hook-handed preacher jailed in 2006 for inciting murder and racial hatred.
Zambia's Banda loses second term bid to old rival
Zambia’s opposition leader Mr Michael Sata of Patriotic Front (PF) has defeated the incumbent President Mr Rupiah Banda of Movement for Multi-party Democracy (MMD) in a tightly contested presidential election. In 2008 Mr Sata lost the presidential election to Banda by 35,000 votes in an election triggered by the sudden death of Levy Mwanawasa.
Danquah Institute boss gives NDC congress 'remarkable' rating
The Executive Director of the Danquah Institute has applauded the just-ended congress of the National Democratic Congress (NDC), urging other political parties “to take a cue" from it. Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko said although the party’s congress might have experienced minor “security hitches,” overall performance was “remarkable.” “I think it went very well and I was very happy about it…It’s about time we moved away from this negative expectation from party meetings where you are afraid that there would be violence; you are afraid that things that don’t actually matter are the very things that…dominate the headlines,” Mr Otchere-Darko said. The pro-liberal think-tank boss said this when he featured on Joy FM’s Super Morning Show on Monday.
Joy FM story on UNDP report was misleading
In the 6.00 pm news bulletin of Joy Fm on Monday, 15th May 2012, the station reported that a UNDP research had cited the Kufuor Administration for neglecting Agriculture and rather spending twice as much on the Military. The said research finding was the African Human Development Report 2012. However, there is no such finding in the African Human Development Report 2012. A review of page 53 of the report, where Joy FM picked its story from, compares “Cumulative Military spending” and “Agricultural Research & Development spending” for the period 2000 to 2008.
May 2012 Synovate Opinion Poll
The following sampling procedure were applied using a fully structured face-to-face questionnaire at household level. The target population covered by our Omnibus survey May 2012 is the general public aged 18 years and above living in Ghana. Each of the 10 regions’ sample was proportionate to its population. Urban/Rural split was 50:50 reflecting the national split as well as gender for Male/Female 49:51 respectively as existed in the sampling frame. Hence our sample is nationally representative and is self-weighting. Click here for details of poll
Al Hajj Should Leave DI out of their Propaganda
The attention of the Danquah Institute has been drawn to a publication by the Al Hajj Newspaper of 26th of September 2013, and subsequently reproduced on several online news outlets, including Ghanaweb. The Al Hajj Newspaper reports, somewhat incomprehensibly that the Danquah Institute perceives and/or plans on using the “New Free Press” as a destructive tool to run-down the Asantehene “with the accusation of conspiring with President Mahama to bribe the Justices of the Supreme Court, to rule in the latter’s favor.”
Danquah Institute Holds Conference on Biometric Voter Registration and E-Voting
The Danquah Institute, with support from other civil society groups, Development Partners and the Electoral Commission of Ghana, will on Monday, organise a 2-day seminar to interrogate the viability of Electronic Voting and the challenges and advantages of a biometric voter register in Ghana for the 2012 general elections and beyond. It will be the first of Danquah Institute’s Annual Governance & Development Dialogue Series. The two-day conference takes place at the Alisa Hotels, North Ridge, Accra, Ghana, on Feb 8-9, 2010. The first day will be devoted to Biometric Voter Registration; with Day 2 probing the question whether or not e-voting could work in Ghana and if so which model(s) would suit our environment.
I have chosen the topic, Islam, Politics and Development: Negotiating the Future of Dagbon for good reason. Islam, since its introduction into Dagbon in 1700 through the conversion of Na Zangina, has exerted great influence on the Dagomba people. Dagomba customs and traditions are inextricably interwoven with Islamic ones. Naming, marriage and funeral ceremonies all show considerable Islamic influences. Even the most important festival of the Dagomba people, Damba, is celebrated to commemorate or coincide with Prophet Muhammad’s birthday. As far back as 1820, Joseph Dupuis, the British Consul to Ghana, on the testimony of Yendi traders, classified Dagbon among “governments which are either purely Moslem, or countries where the Koranic law had been received and serves for the civil code of the believer and infidel. more >>>
Biometric Registration: The next step in Ghana’s Democratic Development . Some Troubling Questions for the Government.
Needless to say, Ghana has been the leading light in the West African sub-region since before the dawn of independence. Indeed our independence was, to be accurate, achieved in a bloodless manner – achieved more through ‘jaw jaw’ with the Colonialists than by force. Thus was established the abiding image that Ghanaians are a peace loving people, a democratic people. Other than President Nkrumah increasingly losing his respect for multiparty democracy which invited the 1966 coup d’etat, and subsequently other needless military interventions, including the Acheampong and Rawlings coups, our country has managed in 54 years of existence, four Republican Constitutions, the fourth of which we are currently enjoying.
In the last fifteen years a problem has presented itself to the courts in the form of a limitation on a power which, prior to this time, most courts had come to consider as axiomatic. This was the power to punish for contempt. In its broadest sense, this power had existed in the courts from the time of their inception, founded in a public policy which regarded it as an attribute both inherent and necessary for the protection of the judicial function.' While never entirely above regulation, 2 restriction upon any aspect of its exercise was re- garded as a matter of immediate concern to the courts in which it vested. Thus, when Bridges v. California 3 decided in 1941 that the power of state courts to impose criminal punishment for contempt on individuals who, by public comment, attempt to exert influence over judicial proceedings was subject to the freedoms of speech and press guaranteed by the First Amendment, the decision was looked upon by many writers with varying degrees of alarm. 4 Nor was it unnatural that the flood of commentaries which the case evoked should deal primarily with the long range effects of the decision, rather than to attempt more than a surface analysis of the holding itself. Viewing the law as it developed out of the Bridges case and the ones which followed, it is felt that there is a need for clarification of this nebulous field, and to submit an interpretation which, it is hoped, represents the law as it stands today. Full Document