There is little time for Mr Mahama and the NDC to turn the economy around before the December 2016 presidential and legislative elections.


Last week, the NPP led a brave charge for a new register at a public forum which I maintain was arranged to reject that very proposition. Leading the vociferous charge against disturbing the current register was the ruling National Democratic Congress, supported by parties, most of whom exist only on paper, but have reserved seats at the IPAC table.


The chairman of the National Peace Council, Most Rev. Prof. Emmanuel Asante, has expressed worry over what he described as “entrenched positions” taken by some political parties on how to hold successful elections.


This report provides institutional assessment of the Electoral Commission of Ghana (hereinafter EC). The assessment was conducted in the period of July-August 2015 under the UNDP-funded project “Conduct of an Institutional Assessment and the Development a Strategic Plan for the Electoral Commission of Ghana”.

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Quiet Disobedience
The debut edition of the New Museum Triennial in 2009 was called “Younger Than Jesus,” signaling that the show was very much about age: Everyone in it was under 33. The title of the 2012 Triennial, “The Ungovernables,” shifts the emphasis to attitude. The artists are not only young, the idea is, but they’re also disobedient, mutinous enfants terribles. How true this is of their art turns out to be highly debatable, but the show does look and feel different from its moody, jangly predecessor.
54 Members of Parliament have petitioned the Speaker of Parliament to recall Members for an emergency deliberation to set up an urgent enquiry on the District Assembly elections fiasco. The petition, signed by 54 MPs from the Minority side of the House, including Independent MPs, is in accordance with Article 112(3) and Order 38(1) of the Standing Orders of Parliament, which allows 15% of Members to request for a an urgent meeting of Parliament and for the Speaker to, within a week, summon a meeting of Parliament for the consideration of the urgent agenda.
Dzi Wo Fie Asem: Rhetoric and the Politics of Expediency
On 7th January 2011, His Excellency the President, in a face to face encounter with the media, used a proverb that has now become a household expression: Dzi wo fie asem. The incident could be considered as only a trigger for this evening’s talk, which centers on the character of political rhetoric within Ghana’s contemporary history. There appears to be a growing sensitivity to political communication in this country: specifically the norms of communication, or standards of propriety in speech comportment. There is a collective realization that the spoken word may have done a lot to shape our political fortunes. Throughout our contemporary history, the spoken word has been so important in our political life, that not only is free speech enshrined in the constitution; care has also been taken to integrate speaking regulations within governance forums, from parliamentary discourse, through discourse in the law courts, to executive discourse at cabinet meetings, and to presidential discourses of engagement
Ghana gov’t urged to increase credit ratings
A financial analyst and CEO of SEM Capital, Dr. Sam Mensah, has said that Ghana needs to raise its credit ratings as an alternative to facilitate any form of borrowing especially on the capital market. He made the assertion during a roundtable discussion organized by the Danquah Institute and partnered by the World Bank and Citi FM on the three billion Chinese loan facility, which has been contracted by the Ghana government for various development projects.
What Our Politicians Can Learn From Thatcher: The Politics Of Conviction Not Indecision
On Saturday, I was driving through the University of Legon campus, in a four-wheel drive, when one of a small group of young men (about 8 in all) at a junction, shouted “Ghana money!” at me. I patiently got to a safer part of the road, turned the vehicle around and drove back to the students to have a small not-so-friendly chat. I told them how disappointed I was in their exhibition of envy as they prepare themselves for a competitive adult world. I told them that I was also once a student and worked hard to get to where I am today and continue to work hard to get better. I would hate for them to go through all that to be envied for trying to be successful through hard work. I advised them, in not so many words, not to equate success to corruption when they have no basis and to rather celebrate success, be inspired by it and aspire to it.
Uganda ministers Bumba and Makubuya resign after probe
The committee said President Yoweri Museveni was not responsible for the compensation sum paid out Two cabinet ministers in Uganda at the centre of a corruption scandal have resigned. They agreed to step down after a parliamentary investigation found they had illegally paid out millions of dollars to a city businessman.
GHANA’S TROUBLED ECONOMY Where are the remedies?
On Tuesday, March 5, 2013 the Minister of Finance came to Parliament to deliver the NDC administration’s Budget Statement and Economic Policy for the 2013 financial year. It was a hogwash of assorted patchworks and propaganda. But it was presented as a set of remedies to give the nation a breakthrough, a new beginning and to provide a bail out from the myriad of problems including the huge public debt; the lamentable fiscal deficit, the humongous arrears, unbridled overspending, worsening unemployment, deteriorating utility services, and failing social services. Somehow, government managed to hope that the 2013 budget statement and economic policy would propel real national development in the various sectors.
NPP fears EC disaster in biometric registration
The Chairman of the opposition New Patriotic Party, Jake Obetsebi-Lamptey, has expressed his party’s deep sense of apprehension about the secretive and silent manner with which the Electoral Commission is conducting affairs towards the 2012 elections, describing it as a recipe for disaster. In light of this, Jake has stated emphatically that the NPP would not be a supporter of the flawed and opaque process the Electoral Commission is currently embarking on in handling the impending Biometric Voter Registration exercise.
Press Statement: Public forum on Gov't/STX Korea Housing Deal
The Danquah Institute and the Imani Centre, with support from the World Bank and our media partner, Citi FM. We were compelled to hold this emergency stakeholders forum of the Ghanaian building industry because of moves by Parliament to approve a US$1.5 billion Supplier's Credit Financing Agreement between STX Engineering and Construction Ghana Limited as Lender and the Government of Ghana in relation to the financing of the 30,000 housing units under the Security Services Housing Project. This comes out of the agreement signed on the 9th December 2009, between STX Korea and the Ghanaian government for a joint venture to build 200,000 residential units across all 10 major regional capitals of Ghana at a cost of US$10 billion. Frank Tackie, the President of the Ghana Institute of Planners, representing also the Ghana Institute of Architects, the Ghana Institute of Engineers and the Ghana Institute of Surveyors, said alternative local building materials, local expertise and better value for money can be achieved if Government had focused on Ghanaian firms, materials and expertise rather than Korea.
Polls open after DR Congo clashes
Polls have opened for the Democratic Republic of Congo's presidential elections, after a run-up marred by violence and logistical delays. The head of the electoral commission said 99% of polling stations were ready and voting would go ahead as planned. At least three people were killed on Saturday, leading to a police ban on final campaign rallies. It is the second presidential poll in DR Congo since the end of 1996-2003 wars which left four million dead.