We invited the media today for this news conference because we find it strange and potentially dangerous that the most reasonable solution that was tabled by the VCRAC Crabbe panel for giving Ghana a credible register for credible elections in 2016 appears to have been totally ignored by the Electoral Commission. We, therefore, want to draw attention to this and ask you, journalists, the Fourth Estate of the Realm, to demand urgent answers from the Electoral Commission on the fate of the wise proposal from the EC’s own panel of experts for the introduction of validation for the voters’ register. Full Publication

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Status Of Electoral Reform In Ghana
In recent months, political parties including the New Patriotic Party (NPP) and the Convention People’s Party (CPP) and civil society groups such as the Let My Vote Count Alliance have made the case for urgent electoral reform in the lead up to the November 2016 elections.
Why the west should rule out military action against Iran
With tough new sanctions in place, further measures threatened by Iran, naval forces mustering in the Persian Gulf, and state-sponsored terrorism ongoing, we are on the brink of a military conflict. Israel, at this very moment, is contemplating whether to undertake a strike. This would be calamitous, and could lead to regional war. What is desperately needed is a fresh assessment of the situation. The west's approach of sanctions and sabre-rattling are yesterday's failed policies. The fact we are once again on the cusp of conflict is testament to that failure.
Fraud and corruption is costing Britain £30 billion a year
It is almost 25 years since the Roskill Report published its radical recommendations for improving the way complex fraud, corruption and financial market crimes are tackled. In that time the complexity of business transactions and the amount of activity in financial markets have both increased dramatically.
Report on the Presidential Election Petition in Ghana
The international community, generally, endorsed Ghana’s 2012 elections as “free and fair.” Ghana, the continent’s star of democracy, had done it once again for Africa. John Mahama, the declared winner, was duly sworn in without any violent protests on January 7, 2013. But, the country’s biggest opposition party filed a petition in Ghana’s supreme court, (the first of its kind in the country’s history), challenging the presidential results. Click here for full report
AN Overview of Dr Bawumia's Book on Ghana's Economy
The book inter alia undertakes an in-depth review of Ghana’s monetary policy regimes since independence: Direct Controls, Monetary Targeting, and Inflation Targeting under different governments (including Nkrumah, NLC, Busia, Acheampong, Rawlings, Kufuor). Financial sector development and reforms that have taken place alongside the monetary policy regimes are also placed under the microscope. These include regulatory and legal reforms, capital market and money market reforms, banking reforms, currency redenomination, reforms, payment system reform, rural banking reforms, and Ghana’s debut sovereign bond issue. Why were these monetary policy regimes and financial sector reforms adopted? What role did the political economy play in the reforms and outcomes? What was the impact of the different monetary regimes and financial sector reforms on the performance of Ghana’s economy? more >>>
Ghana: Gas for growth
Encouraged by the rapid development of its nascent oil sector – which began production in record time and helped push GDP growth up to 13.6% in 2011 – Ghana is hoping to cash in equally as quickly on its natural gas reserves but is still navigating the sizeable infrastructural hurdles that need to be overcome in the short term. The country’s reserves are currently estimated at 5trn cu ft, which offers significant potential both for industrial usage and domestic consumption. The opportunities the still-undeveloped sector offers are large, which has pushed it front and centre on the government’s policy agenda.
Zambia's Banda loses second term bid to old rival
Zambia’s opposition leader Mr Michael Sata of Patriotic Front (PF) has defeated the incumbent President Mr Rupiah Banda of Movement for Multi-party Democracy (MMD) in a tightly contested presidential election. In 2008 Mr Sata lost the presidential election to Banda by 35,000 votes in an election triggered by the sudden death of Levy Mwanawasa.
The new mayor of Accra has given street and pavement hawkers up to June 15, 2009 to relocate themselves to the appropriate spaces provided for them. The Mayor has committed several information vans broadcasting in various languages to the masses throughout the metropolis on his impending intention – RID ACCRA OF FILTH. Can he achieve it? That is the big question! So far, the response from the hawkers appears to be that of obstinate stubbornness – “we won’t leave the streets unless they provide cheaper and affordable spaces for us”. He certainly is not the first Mayor to attempt the feat but I think a clean Accra can be attained.
Postponement of Liberty Lecture
The Danquah Institute regrets to announce that the Liberty Lecture scheduled for this evening has been postponed to Wednesday, August 31, 2011. We regret deeply any inconvenience caused by this postponement.
Hold elections in November - Final report recommends
The Constitution Review Commission (CRC) has recommended that the presidential and parliamentary elections be conducted in November in subsequent election years after 2012 to facilitate smooth transitional processes. The commission further proposed the expunging of the indemnity clauses of the 1992 Constitution which provide coup makers immunity from prosecution.