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Pro –opposition Think Tank, the Danquah Institute says the Electoral Commission (EC’s) decision to use de-duplication processes to rid the voters register of multiple registration will do very little to make the current voters register credible.

The EC earlier in a statement outlined a process to remove multiple registrations from the electoral roll through the use of a software and other measures of de-duplication.

However speaking to Citi News, the Executive Director of the Danquah Institute, Nana Atobrah Quaicoe insisted the EC’s approach cannot remove the six hundred thousand ghost names.

“We have identified some multiple registration in the voters register. The EC says it is dealing with it by way of de-duplication. You ask yourself how many levels of de-duplicated exercises have the EC not done? If de duplication were the cure then we would not be doing it again because we have done several of these processes in the past and that de duplication exercise can only deal with fingerprints that appear twice or more. How about the phenomenon of names of dead persons on the register? There is no exercise or machine that can determine the fingerprint of a dead person and the fingerprint of someone who is alive. As it maybe the committee of five , that sat during the forum by the EC has provided a clear way by which we can read the register and put multiple registrations of underaged of minors as well as ghost names.”

The Danquah Institute believes the EC can effectively delete ghost names on the register only if it incorporates what it calls, voter validation in the registration exercise.

The Institute in a bid to promote this exercise has called on the EC to postpone the limited registration exercise to give it more time to execute the voter validation exercise.

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