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GSS hoodwinks Ghanaians - Where is the 2010 census report?
The Danquah Institute (DI) has observed with disappointment and pity the press conference held by the Ghana Statistical Service last week, ostensibly, to announce the 2010 Population and Housing Census Results to the Ghanaian people. What transpired that day was shameful and an insult to the intelligence of the people of Ghana. To our dismay, no census report, per se, was presented to Ghanaians by the GSS.
Outlawing Criminal Libel Laws in Ghana
I am honoured by the invitation to participate in this important colloquium on the twin themes of “African Constitutionalism: Present Challenges and Prospects for the Future” and “African Constitutionalism and the Media”, important, at least, for those of us who believe that entrenching the principles of democratic accountability, respect for human rights and the rule of law at the very centre of Africa’s body politic is critical to Africa’s chances of meaningful development in this 21st century. Decades of authoritarian rule across the continent in the post independence era not only subverted the promise of the independence movement that freedom would result in good governance, progress and prosperity, but also led to the systematic worsening of the already low living standards of the African people.
Supreme Court corrupted the Constitution
The Executive Director of the Danquah Institute, Mr Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko says he does not intend to apologise to the Supreme Court for his description of the Court’s election petition verdict as ‘corrupt’. The comment which followed the verdict that upheld the validity of President John Dramani Mahama’s election in the 2012 presidential election, has widely been deemed contemptuous.
DaMina Advisors Frontier Markets Report: Ghana polls, opposition now have edge
Ghana’s new president John Mahama on 1 August picked reclusive central bank governor Paa Kwesi Amissah-Arthur as his nominee for Ghana’s vacant vice presidency. Mahama took office on 25 July when President John Atta Mills succumbed to years of ill health and died suddenly in Accra. Mahama replaced Mills and left his office of vice presidency vacant. Click here to read full report
Petroleum price subsidy unavoidable but who pays for it?
The debate over petroleum subsidy often evokes emotions, accusations and counter accusations. The latest withdrawal of subsidies on petroleum products in Ghana is not different. Predictably, petroleum politics have always led to political tensions and in some cases political instability. But the reality is that international crude oil prices, a major determinant of petroleum product prices is out of the control of importing countries. The Governments of these countries must therefore formulate policies including sustainable subsidy schemes that address market objectives without compromising political and social stability.
Dr, Joseph Kyeretwie Boakye Danquah - A Tribute by Atta Akyea (MP)
On the 4th of February 1965, exactly 45 years ago, in a little cell at the Nsawam prisons, you departed for eternity. Why Nsawam prisons and not your comfortable bed? What was a thoroughbred son of Okyeman and Asanteman, a UK trained lawyer and philosopher doing in prison? It is because you did not believe in tyranny and resisted the oppressor’s rule. With your asthmatic and hypertensive condition in that foul environment, it was as if your death had been teleguided by those hiding behind the pernicious Preventive Detention Act. Your family saw death in those hostile circumstances as an eventual inevitability.
The term “corruption” is used as a shorthand reference for a large range of illicit or illegal activities. Although there is no universal or comprehensive definition as to what constitutes corrupt behavior, the most prominent definitions share a common emphasis upon the abuse of public power or position for personal advantage. The Oxford Unabridged Dictionary defines corruption as “perversion or destruction of integrity in the discharge of public duties by bribery or favor.” The Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary defines it as “inducement to wrong by improper or unlawful means (as bribery).” The succinct definition utilized by the World Bank is “the abuse of public office for private gain.” This definition is similar to that employed by Transparency International (TI), the leading NGO in the global anticorruption effort: “Corruption involves behavior on the part of officials in the public sector, whether politicians or civil servants, in which they improperly and unlawfully enrich themselves, or those close to them, by the misuse of the public power entrusted to them.” more >>>
If we educate our people and the oil run out we would’ve saved our nation – Nana Addo
The Presidential Candidate of the opposition New Patriotic Party, Nana Akufo-Addo has mounted arguably the most robust defence yet of his free senior high school promise. Answering a question on how to use the country’s oil resources for the benefit of the people, Nana Akufo-Addo said his commitment to the free SHS policy was not about winning the December elections but about preparing the country’s next generation.
Dzi Wo Fie Asem: Rhetoric and the Politics of Expediency
On 7th January 2011, His Excellency the President, in a face to face encounter with the media, used a proverb that has now become a household expression: Dzi wo fie asem. The incident could be considered as only a trigger for this evening’s talk, which centers on the character of political rhetoric within Ghana’s contemporary history. There appears to be a growing sensitivity to political communication in this country: specifically the norms of communication, or standards of propriety in speech comportment. There is a collective realization that the spoken word may have done a lot to shape our political fortunes. Throughout our contemporary history, the spoken word has been so important in our political life, that not only is free speech enshrined in the constitution; care has also been taken to integrate speaking regulations within governance forums, from parliamentary discourse, through discourse in the law courts, to executive discourse at cabinet meetings, and to presidential discourses of engagement
Hundreds of Congo's registered voters may be fake
For several weeks now, accusations have been flung back and forth between the election commission and the opposition about the voter register, a database of around 32 million voters that identifies those eligible to vote in the November elections. The stakes are potentially huge, as if the register is rigged, it will be difficult for observers at the polling stations to identify fraud. The report is a confidential document written in early August by Zetes, a Belgian company contracted by the Congolese government to issue biometric voters cards.