No society has been able to sustainably develop its human and physical resources to affect the most of its people without a strong values system. The competition of Ideas they say are the vehicles of transformation but even that requires values to guide it. The Danquah Institute recognizes that a society without values is one in retrogression.  The Institute therefore places high premium on the interactions and exposures that help to build confident and patriotic citizens with integrity.

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Credible information available to the New Statesman indicates that the Electoral Commission has prepared a budget of $230 million for a possible compilation of a new biometric voters register for the 2016 general elections.

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 There are growing concerns over the quality of politics in Ghana. Why people choose to support particular political parties. What motivates allegiances and how all that can affect the nature of our democracy and the general good that society benefits from it.

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Subsidiary Agreement - Gas Infrastructure Project
The Government of the People's Republic of China and the Government of the Republic of Ghana are resolved to expand bilateral relations through harmonious, sustainable and win-win economic co-operation measures, in line with the principles adopted for the Forum on China-Africa Co-operation. The Lender seeks to apply its financial support as a means to enhance bilateral economic and trade relations between China and Ghana by extending commercial loans to the Borrower, to be applied by the Borrower on the terms and conditions set out in this Agreement. Click here for subsidiary agreement
Voter Registration in Africa
Voter registration is highly complex and is the single most expensive activity within the framework of elections. Voter registration is not just the technical implementation of an activity; it is a holistic political, administrative and practical process. The role of voter registration is especially important when it comes to emerging democracies: it can make or break an election. The quality of the process and the product – that is, the voters’ roll – can determine the outcome of an election and consequently the stability of the democratic institutions in acountry. Click here for full article
Abstract Justice delayed, they say, is justice denied. Delay in the dispensation of electoral disputes in Nigeria has become an albatross to the Nigerian nation. It has become a sour point in our electoral process. In this article, the writer meticulously looked at the various strategies and procedures for expediting election petitions and appeals in our electoral system. Introduction The general saying is that justice delayed is justice denied, and section 36 (1) of the constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (as amended) gives to every person the right to have his civil rights and obligations determined by a court after a fair hearing and within a reasonable time. For clarity, the sub-section reads: Full Document
Why China needs Africa more
In the first part of this series, The Daily Maverick asked whether Africa really needs the interventions and investments of the People’s Republic. Our conclusion was that only time would tell. Now we look at why China needs Africa, and the answer seems to be no more complicated than “land and oil” (and a few other precious commodities). As of now, the relationship is far from even. Ever heard of a “Baoding village”? If you haven’t you’re not alone, because there are anthropologists at universities in Australia and the Netherlands who are convinced they don’t exist.
No progress in governance across Africa: Ibrahim survey
Progress in governance across Africa has stalled since 2011, with deteriorating safety and lack of economic opportunity overshadowing any gains made on the human rights front especially in resource-rich nations, a survey said on Monday.
The Wilson Center Honors Howard Wolpe: Life Celebrated for Work in Congress and as Special Envoy
WASHINGTON—Friends, former colleagues, and family members gathered on Thursday to remember Howard Wolpe, who as a diplomat, lawmaker, and director of The Wilson Center's Africa Program worked tirelessly for peace in Africa, from helping to bring democratic majority rule to South Africa to conflict-prone regions like the Great Lakes. “Howard was a champion of all the right causes,” said Susan Rice, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, in a ceremony that included addresses from the Hon. Donald Payne (D-NJ), as well as former Representatives the Hon. David Bonior (D-MI) and the Hon. William H. Gray III (D-PA). Also participating in the service at the Ronald Reagan Building was Ambassador Faida Mitifu, from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Dean of the African diplomatic corps, Jim Margolis and Steve Weissman, former staffers of Wolpe, and Jane Harman, President of the Wilson Center. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) paid tribute via video, as did Rep. John Dingell (D-MI). Wolpe died in October 2011. Present at the celebration of Wolpe’s life were a large number of Senators and Representatives, active and former, and several other African ambassadors and embassy representatives.
Prez Mahama, please tell your surrogates to leave me alone for I’m but a simple pastor – Mensa Otabil
The General Overseer of the International Central Gospel Church, Pastor Mensa Otabil has responded in clearest terms yet to what he calls evil attempts to expose him to public ridicule “and the running harassment against my integrity.”He said the doctoring and manipulation of his sermons over the years to give them political twists was defamatory, unethical, criminal, malicious and evil.
Ghana: Assessing Risks to Stability
Ghana's prospects for long-term stability are being undermined by important structural weaknesses. the political system is highly centralised, the executive is excessively powerful, and patronage politics is corroding public institutions. Social pressures are building due to the slow decline of the country's agricultural sector and its inability to provide jobs for its growing workforce. In the next 5 to 10 years, the main threats to Ghanaian stability will stem from the social and macroeconomic impact of its new oil export sector, the influence of drug trafficking on its political system, and youth unemployment. more>>>
Prof Akosa, the wannabe CPP presidential candidate, who was thrashed by Paa Kwesi Nduom in the 2007 CPP presidential primary, has told us recently that Kotoka’s name on our capital’s international airport is an affront to “democratic Ghana”. It should be removed. Kotoka is, of course, the name of the colonel who led the 1966 coup that toppled Kwame Nkrumah’s government and the First Republic. Akosa’s statement implies, at least to me, that Nkrumah’s Ghana was “democratic.” For those who lived through Nkrumah’s era, this statement is nothing short of astonishing. It is the rewriting of history on a big scale. It should not be allowed. By the time of his overthrow, Ghana had become a one-party state in which the colours of the one party – the Convention People’s Party (CPP) – had become the nation’s colours, replacing the national colours. The creation of the one-party state had been effected through one of the first, if not the first, of the 90% plus “referenda” that came to characterise the results of “referenda” in post-colonial Africa.
Press reports on President Mills' death
Ghana has seen a smooth transition of power after the sudden death of its president, but as the nation mourns attention is already turning to who will replace him as the ruling party's candidate in a December vote. Vice-President John Dramani Mahama was sworn in hours after the announcement of the death through sudden illness on Tuesday of 68-year-old President John Atta Mills.