There is little time for Mr Mahama and the NDC to turn the economy around before the December 2016 presidential and legislative elections.

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The chairman of the National Peace Council, Most Rev. Prof. Emmanuel Asante, has expressed worry over what he described as “entrenched positions” taken by some political parties on how to hold successful elections.

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Last week, the NPP led a brave charge for a new register at a public forum which I maintain was arranged to reject that very proposition. Leading the vociferous charge against disturbing the current register was the ruling National Democratic Congress, supported by parties, most of whom exist only on paper, but have reserved seats at the IPAC table.

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Ghana’s inflation rate rose in February for the second consecutive month as a 30 percent jump in gasoline costs at the beginning of the year pushed up transportation fees. Inflation accelerated to 9.2 percent from 9.1 percent in January, Grace Bediako, head of the Ghana Statistical Service, told reporters today in the capital, Accra. “With most of the upward pressure on inflation arising from the 30 percent fuel-price increase in the new year, February inflation should still be up,” Razia Khan, head of Africa research at Standard Chartered Bank Plc in London, said in an e-mailed note yesterday.
STATUS OF ELECTORAL REFORM IN GHANA A Report by the Danquah Institute
In recent months, political parties in Ghana including the New Patriotic Party (NPP), the Convention People’s Party (CPP), the Progressive People’s Party, religious groups, the media and civil society groups such as the Let My Vote Count Alliance have made the case for urgent and honest electoral reform in the lead up to the November 2016 elections.
I'd intended to critique President Mills' 'State of the Nation Address' but was not so sure which part of the bacon to slice so went for a spot of foreign material that was at the very top, which reads: “Let me acknowledge our first President, Osagyefo Dr Kwame Nkrumah, that illustrious Founder of our nation. His selfless leadership serves as a point of reference in our determination to build a better Ghana. Incidentally, this year marks the 100th anniversary of Dr Nkrumah's birth and a as country we should commemorate the event in an appropriate and befitting manner. Among others, we intend to honour Dr Nkrumah's memory with a national holiday to be known as Founder's Day and we will be presenting legislation to Parliament to this effect.”In so doing, Prof Mills has found a 'neat' way to reward his own Nkrumaism but should this be done at the cost of a serious manipulation of history and disregard for Ghana's true story? Should we do so by ignoring the collective sacrifices of the many who fought this fight before and then alongside Nkrumah?
Why Gov’t should allow us to keep our Mobile Numbers and Switch Providers
At his vetting before the Parliamentary Appointments Committee for the position of Minister of Communications in February, Haruna Iddrisu, MP, said when given the nod he would expedite action on the implementation of mobile number portability (MNP) to empower consumers to make better choice of mobile phone services.He stated: “It is time for the regulation regime to make it possible for mobile phone users to be able to migrate from one network to the other with the whole of the phone numbers, including the network code and I think that it is about time the National Communications Authority brought MNP on.”
Laurent Gbagbo, Cote d’Ivoire's isolated and besieged strongman, has finally been seized by opposition forces in Abidjan. His arrest follows weeks of bloodletting and mayhem in the West African country, fuelled by Gbagbo's stubborn refusal to accept the verdict of elections held last November and by months of incendiary rhetoric from him and others in his camp, inciting violence upon supposed ethnic outsiders like the elections' internationally-recognized victor, Alassane Outtara, and the U.N. peacekeeping mission in the country. But the game is up now for Gbagbo. Much of the Ivorian army supporting him deserted to Ouattara's side or simply melted away. The latest image of Gbagbo is of him looking rather terrified in a room in the Golf Hotel, Ouattara's Abidjan headquarters, which has been defended by a cordon of U.N. peacekeepers who for months had been under threat of attack from Gbagbo’s militia.
Full Speech: Dzi Wo Fie Asem, Rhetoric and the Politics of Expediency
Over the past two weeks or so when the topic of today’s lecture was announced in the media, many friends and colleagues have called, to express concern, that I had chosen a topic that they wouldn’t have touched with a long spoon. Was this the safest topic I could have chosen? Then came a message from a colleague in the Facebook who said, ‘Prof, are you sure the national security is not going to confiscate your script?’ Then last Sunday, I met another friend after church who promised to attend this talk, but said, “Owo Kwesi, Eye abofra bon, paa!” more>>>
DI: $265m STX Insurance is a Rip-Off, Gov’t Can Save $200m with MIGA
Thursday, July 29, 2010:- This week, the Ministry of Finance & Economic Planning submitted, what it termed, “Revised Memorandum to Parliament” and a revised supplier’s credit financing agreement between STX Engineering & Construction Ghana Limited (as ‘Supplier’ – not ‘Lender’) and the Government of Ghana in relation to the $1.5 billion financing of the Security Services Housing Project. In a press statement reacting to this new development after the agreement was withdrawn from the floor of Parliament recently, the Danquah Institute limited its comments to the fees and insurance premium, which it has condemned as “a total rip-off”.
In Summary This article offers five reasons for this conclusion: Supreme Court’s reliance on backward looking, mean-spirited, cramped Nigerian precedent. Tolerant and uncritical acceptance of the IEBC’s explanations on the voter registers. Lack of clarity about IEBC’s duty to ensure that final results could be verified against provisional results. The Court’s use of subsidiary legislation to limit the meaning of “votes cast,” an unambiguous phrase in the Constitution. The evidential foreclosure that the Court imposes on itself by taking judicial notice of technology failures instead of treating IEBC as spurious. Sadly, as the saying is, in this judgment, the Supreme Court has only given us reasons that sound good, not good, sound reasons. Read More >>>
Under her Model Petroleum Agreement (MPA), Ghana, a newcomer in the global oil industry has adopted the Royalty Tax System to govern the fiscal regime for the country’s petroleum sector. Even before production tentatively begins in 2010 when the agreement would be put to test, critics say that Ghana would obtain greater financial benefit under the terms of a production-sharing contract (PSC). This paper discusses Ghana’s MPA and contrasts this to the argument that the country would benefit from using PSCs. The paper describes the MPA, the advantages and disadvantages of an R/T system and those of the PSC System. The paper exceeds the argument that form matters, and points to the importance of either systems having to achieve a stable consensus between the main parties involved. more >>>
Structural Transformation of Ghana’s Economy
When approached by friends to give a presentation on Ghana, the initial idea was to shed light on the much heralded status of Ghana, joining the exclusive club of oil producers and what would be the development prospects for the country. However, realizing that Ghana being a developing country, perhaps it would be a better idea to present a broader picture of the development challenges facing the country, including how prudent the new oil revenue will be managed.