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This report provides institutional assessment of the Electoral Commission of Ghana (hereinafter EC). The assessment was conducted in the period of July-August 2015 under the UNDP-funded project “Conduct of an Institutional Assessment and the Development a Strategic Plan for the Electoral Commission of Ghana”.

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Friday, October 30, 2015, is the opportunity for parties, organisations and journalists at the two-day public forum on the voters’ register to ask the Electoral Commission questions and hopefully get answers that can help decide whether Ghana will have a new register or not.

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Authorities in Guinea imposed a curfew in the city of Nzerekore overnight Monday following violent clashes between rival political groups ahead of the presidential election. Dozens were injured in fighting over the weekend and local media sources said one person was killed, according to Reuters.

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Parties doubt EC’s ability to implement reforms
Political parties in the country have cast doubt on the Electoral Commission’s ability to implement reforms following the challenges which confronted the 2012 polls. The Commission has come under criticisms by some political for its inability to deal effectively with some of the problems that bedevilled the elections, that some argue, could have been avoided.
Lately some elements within the NDC who lack simple knowledge of the history of Ghana have been peddling some revisionist ideas about the reasons and causes of terror during the first republic and completely misinforming unsuspecting Ghanaians while at the same time covering up for the terror that their predecessor the PNDC unleashed on Ghanaians during the 1980s. Following on from the propaganda that was fed to Ghanaians by the then CPP government, which tactics the P/NDC have adopted since 1981, these elements within the NDC are determined to rewrite the history of Ghana but the facts and court proceedings are too strong to give them the credit they are desperately seeking. In this article I intend to set the records straight by giving them an idiot’s guide to the terror history of Ghana.
Full Statement of the 2011 Supplementary Budget
Madam Speaker, following the approval of the 2011 Budget Statement and Economic Policy and coming into effect of the Appropriation Act, it has become necessary for me to once again appear before this august House to present a review of the performance of the economy and supplementary estimates in accordance with Article 179 (8) of the Constitution and Standing Order 143 of Parliament. In so doing, I wish to seek your approval for a supplementary appropriation of GH¢1,463,123,559 on behalf of the President, His Excellency John Evans Atta Mills, the details of which are presented in Section 5 of this report. Click here for full statement
REJECT CORRUPT POLITICIANS  –Presby Moderator urges Ghanaians
The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of Ghana, Right Reverend Professor Emmanuel Martey, has cautioned the electorate not to make the mistake of voting to entrust their destinies and the management of the nation’s resources into the hands of corrupt leaders. Rev Prof Martey has also drawn the attention of the electorate to the fact that Ghana needs leaders who are men and women of integrity to govern the nation, and not leaders who would not care for the wellbeing of the people but rather use the resources and power of the nation to satisfy their selfish interests.
On June 26, 2013, Justice Atuguba, the presiding judge of the 9-member panel used the Court as a vehicle to accuse Samuel Awuku of engaging in an ill- defined, improper conduct. The said conduct appears to be related to comments that Mr. Awuku made on air, during a political discussion. In particular, he is said to have criticized the panel for “being selective and hypocritical,” in citing a Daily Guide reportage of the Court’s proceedings. Mr. Awuku subsequently appeared before the panel and after a short hearing, in which he apologized for his comments, the panel banned him from making further appearances in the Court. As far as I could tell, Mr. Awuku was not represented by counsel. Nor was he accused of a specific offence (as far as I could tell).
Multi-biometric identification helps ensure a fair and efficient election process in Kenya
Civil unrest in the aftermath of Kenya’s 2007 elections prompted the government of Kenya to completely overhaul its system of managing elections. The IIEC was formed to replace the previous Electoral Commission of Kenya and charged with the mission to institutionalize sustainable electoral processes that would guarantee fair elections. The mandate of the IIEC covered all aspects of implementing elections including reform of the electoral process; conducting a fresh registration of all Kenyan voters to create a completely new voter register; developing a modern system for collection, collation, transmission and tallying of electoral data and promoting voter education.
The Turning Point in Housing
China reached an important turning point in housing policy on April 17, 2010. Policy shifted from stimulating growth to controlling speculative demand for housing, as well as increasing the supply of affordable housing. The central government has pushed the policies on reluctant local government officials, who are dependent on land-sales revenues and closely intertwined with real estate interests. Despite the tensions in implementation, central government commitment to the policy turn appears strong, and it is likely it will be sustained. more >>>
Providing Homes for the People - How Property-Owning Democracy was Bastardised
March 2009 is ending with agitation over Ga lands and the threat of a similar agitation in the Western Region. In my view all this could have been effectively avoided or neutralised if only the New Patriotic Party was steadfast and more radical in its realisation of the dream of a property-owning democracy.In April 4, 2007, I wrote an article explaining ‘Development in Freedom’ – the slogan of the NPP –– the party of proponents of free market and developmentalism like Danquah, Busia and Dombo That article argues, fundamental to the doctrine of Danquah-Busiaism is the principle that freedom is the primary end as well as the active means to development.
Constitutional Review Process is Flawed
Early this week (1/11/10), President John Evans Atta-Mills inaugurated a 9-member Constitutional Review Commission (CRC) charged with making relevant suggestions and recommendations to the Ghanaian president for possible implementation in the offing. Indeed, it can hardly be gainsaid that after 18 years of field operation, Ghana’s 1992 Republican/Democratic Constitution may well be due for a critical reexamination and operational streamlining or overhaul. Many critics among members of the general public, for example, have in recent years vehemently inveighed against what they term as the “unconstitutionality” of several salient aspects of the Fourth-Republican Constitution, especially with regard to the so-called Indemnity Clause which has enabled such “giant” political criminals like Mr. Jeremiah John Rawlings to legitimize his criminality into “revolutionary acts of probity and accountability” and thus also permissible acts which lie well beyond justiciable acts pertaining to human rights violation. Consequently, it would be quite intriguing to witness what the commission returns, by way of a verdict in between 12 to 18 months hence.
After experiencing inflation of 40.5% plus in 1999-2000, inflation in Ghana is currently 9.08%. The current government is boasting that it has consistently brought inflation down from the highest of 22% from mid 2009. The NPP administration naturally credited itself for bringing inflation down from 40.5% to the 18% in 2008 when they left power. In this paper I intend to look at the policies both administration worked on to bring down the figures. In the developed economies, sound monetary and fiscal policies are the most important tools for maintaining low inflation. The central bank’s monetary policy committees are given an inflation target by the government. The first step is for the central bank to try and predict future inflation. They look at various economic statistics and try to decide whether the economy is overheating. If inflation is forecast to increase above the target, the central bank will increase interest rates. Most central banks have used interest rates to try and achieve inflationary target.