Nigeria's gross government revenues rose for the second consecutive month in June to 485.95 billion naira ($2.44 billion), up 33 percent from May, the finance ministry said.

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With both the West and East now courting Nairobi, President Kenyatta must decide how to do business with allies both old and new.

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The European Union has moved to check emigration from West Africa by voting to invest 1.15 billion euros in aid for West Africa through to 2020.

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A growing number of sub-Saharan African countries – South Africa, Tanzania, Kenya, Botswana, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, and more recently, Ghana – now require that the Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) card in a mobile phone be tied to the user’s name. The main reason: to combat crime. But I am afraid that with its narrow rationale and focus, this exercise misses the big picture; i.e., a golden opportunity to develop a good database that could become the building blocks for stronger institutions and economic transformation. Cross-country growth studies show that strong institutions are the surest bet out of this quagmire, a fact that has been echoed several times by Prince Kofi Amoabeng, CEO of UT Bank and arguably, the most-respected CEO in Ghana. When asked in a recent interview on how to reform the institutions, Mr. Amoabeng emphasized the role of information. “We have to go back to the basics. Information about the people, proper home and business addresses; proper identification make it possible to collect appropriate taxes that will fund projects,” he added. But developing good institutions, when powers that be benefit from its absence, is not going to be easy. Sure, a fixed-address system will help, but you only need to take one look at Accra, not to mention smaller towns/villages, to realize that street addressing remains a dream for now.
Danquah Institute boss gives NDC congress 'remarkable' rating
The Executive Director of the Danquah Institute has applauded the just-ended congress of the National Democratic Congress (NDC), urging other political parties “to take a cue" from it. Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko said although the party’s congress might have experienced minor “security hitches,” overall performance was “remarkable.” “I think it went very well and I was very happy about it…It’s about time we moved away from this negative expectation from party meetings where you are afraid that there would be violence; you are afraid that things that don’t actually matter are the very things that…dominate the headlines,” Mr Otchere-Darko said. The pro-liberal think-tank boss said this when he featured on Joy FM’s Super Morning Show on Monday.
Suspicious bank accounts to be frozen — FIC
The Head of the Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC) at the Bank of Ghana, Mr Samuel Essel, has hinted that there are moves underway to freeze the accounts of certain individuals who have lodged huge sums of monies in separate accounts of banks in the country. He said the move has become necessary in view of the inability of the owners of the accounts to disclose the source of the monies.
“Building a society of aspirations and opportunities in Ghana – the path to prosperity” Speech delivered by Nana Addo-Dankwa Akufo-Addo at the 1st liberty lecture
{enclose Akufo-AddoLibertySpeech082011.mp3} The Danquah Institute is to be warmly commended for initiating what hopefully will be these annual lectures, and I thank them most sincerely for giving me the honour of delivering the first in the series. The Institute had originally scheduled this lecture to be held on 4th August to commemorate the special significance of that date in our nation’s history and thereby provide the rationale for these Liberty Lectures. Click here for full speech
African Elections: How to save votes
COULD smartphones help reduce electoral fraud in Africa and in other regions? At a recent forum hosted by the Brookings Institution on the ways that wireless technologies are affecting politics in various countries, Clark Gibson, a professor at the University of California, San Diego (USCD), presented findings from experiments in Afghanistan and Uganda which suggest that they can. Local researchers were deployed to polling stations armed with digital cameras and smartphones to take photographs of the publicly posted election tallies. The research found that this alone can cut electoral fraud by up to 60%.
Dr J B Danquah, Ghana's President we never had (Part 1)
The image and memorabilia of some very prominent patriots who have spent the whole of their time struggling for the ideals of good governance and self-government have been pushed under the carpets of some so-called new era politicians. As to who did what in the past, bringing about the present that they have come to inherit, that will lead us into the future is not their concern.
Vigilance is the Motto for December 7
Next week Ghanaians will go to the polls to choose who they want to lead them for the next four years. The patriotic call to all communities across the country is simply this: Take it upon yourself, peacefully and legitimately, to protect your ballot, to protect your mandate, to protect your democracy, and to protect your nation. We of the Danquah Institute would be remiss if we claimed not to share the same concern about the politics in Ghana becoming as divisive as they have been over the last several months. However, the Danquah Institute stands together with those tirelessly working to maintain peace and ensure that Ghana remains a free and fair democracy.
Since the 2003 FSAP Update, Ghana’s financial system has undergone rapid growth and structural transformation. Although the financial system remains relatively underdeveloped, the number of intermediaries and their scale of operations have increased, most notably in banking, insurance, capital markets, and micro finance. The range of financial services has also broadened and corporate structures are becoming complex, with conglomerates gaining importance. In addition, foreign shareholding, particularly from within Africa, has increased in the banking and insurance sectors. more>>>
The government announced a 30% increase in ex-pump price of petroleum products with the build up covering crude oil price, TOR debt recovery levy, BOST levy, markerting and distribution margins. There is likely not to be cheap conventional oil any longer . for the past decade, global crude oil output has hovered between 62 million barrels per day and 65 million barrels except in 2006 when it reached 67 million barrels before falling to 65 million barrels and has remained there. At the same time upstream investments are not matching the global supply requirement during to increasing demand. The recent global recovery led by Asia and to some extent Latin America has further put pressure on supply. Global demand is ever increasing and will increase further with the growing global economy. Countries are therefore bracing up to the phenomenon of high oil prices. Some are increasing their efforts at alternative energy mainstreaming and others are introducing conservation programmes.
Hundreds of Congo's registered voters may be fake
For several weeks now, accusations have been flung back and forth between the election commission and the opposition about the voter register, a database of around 32 million voters that identifies those eligible to vote in the November elections. The stakes are potentially huge, as if the register is rigged, it will be difficult for observers at the polling stations to identify fraud. The report is a confidential document written in early August by Zetes, a Belgian company contracted by the Congolese government to issue biometric voters cards.