×

Error

AutoTweet NG Component is not installed or not enabled. - /home/danquahi/public_html/plugins/system/autotweetcontent/autotweetcontent.php

Negotiations are not held in a vacuum. A nation that sits around the table without prior knowledge and appreciation of its own strengths and weaknesses in its counterpart’s mind has provided gaping holes in its negotiation armoury and is bound to come out with a bad deal.

A good deal depends on both an understanding of the cards in your hands and your opponent’s, and the skilful and strategic play of these cards. The first of these cards that the Ghanaian government must not fail to appreciate is the fact that Superpower America now sees West Africa as a zone of strategic importance – it’s no longer a question of just us needing them, but they now also need us.

Read more...

Furthermore, the U.S. is, understandably, bent on establishing a regional command for Africa, similar to U.S. Forces Korea, with a homeport situated on the African continent to protect their interests. West Africa is its natural home, given the need to protect energy interests in the Gulf of Guinea. Liberia has offered but simply cannot match the kind of convenience available in Ghana. It can be a win-win situation.

AFRICOM can protect U.S. investments in our region. But, those investments (regardless of our percentage share of ownership) are also fundamentally our investments – and thus the assistance in their protection will be a welcome boon. U.S. military presence can also help improve the level of military professionalism of our already well-respected troops. It is interesting to note that in the six decades since World War II in which America has maintained a military presence in other sovereign nations, none of the host nations has suffered instability or military takeovers, as the presence of U.S. troops helps entrench the subordination of soldiers to civil leadership. Moreover the presence of U.S. troops boosts social and economic activities in the host countries, too.

Read more...

This all points to the fact that the United States sees Ghana as having all the vital statistics and morphological features of a ‘natural’ ally. We have the oil reserves, we are in the stable centre of the ‘New Gulf’ and we have the military discipline and stable atmosphere to make us the perfect hosts for America’s first major military migration to our continent.

America is strategically placed to maintain and deepen its stronger footing here, ensuring it rather than China becomes our dominant ally. As one analyst confirmed, Washington has no interest in seeing China’s presence in Africa extended to Ghana. The fact, however, is that China is already here and the recent dealings between the Mills administration and the ruling Chinese Communist Party means the U.S. needs to act sooner rather than later.

Read more...

Other Stories

DaMina Advisors Frontier Markets Report: Ghana polls, opposition now have edge
Ghana’s new president John Mahama on 1 August picked reclusive central bank governor Paa Kwesi Amissah-Arthur as his nominee for Ghana’s vacant vice presidency. Mahama took office on 25 July when President John Atta Mills succumbed to years of ill health and died suddenly in Accra. Mahama replaced Mills and left his office of vice presidency vacant. Click here to read full report
Press release on Thursday public forum on Govt/STX Korea Housing Deal
Danquah Institute(DI), The Imani Centre and The World Bank are organizing a public forum to probe Government’s US$1.5 Billion Supplier’s Credit Facility Agreement for Housing with STX Korea, a construction firm from the Republic of Korea. Tuesday June 01, Accra– Danquah Institute (DI), a leader in policy advancement, advocacy and research in collaboration with the World Bank and Imani Centre will on Thursday 3rd June hold a public forum at the British Council Hall on the feasibility of the agreement between the Government of Ghsna and STX Korea for the construction of 200,000 housing units for $10 billion.
The paper presents a base case economic analysis of the current East African regional integration processes. The fast track political federation processes which started in 2004, establishment of East African customs Union (EAC-CU) in 2005, and the recent 2008 renewed African Economic Community initiatives are part and parcel of the third generation regional integration economic and political reforms pursued by the partner states, and aimed at fostering both national and regional competitive social economic capacities. The paper notes that East African economies are small, but with regional integration, there is a possibility for opening up new business activities, markets, access to finance and technology. These aspects are crucial for maximum utilization of natural and human resources for sustainable economic growth and reduction of poverty. Also, the paper finds that standards of living in these East African countries are similar, below average African continental standards and declining in many areas. more >>>
If we educate our people and the oil run out we would’ve saved our nation – Nana Addo
The Presidential Candidate of the opposition New Patriotic Party, Nana Akufo-Addo has mounted arguably the most robust defence yet of his free senior high school promise. Answering a question on how to use the country’s oil resources for the benefit of the people, Nana Akufo-Addo said his commitment to the free SHS policy was not about winning the December elections but about preparing the country’s next generation.
If I were one of the big corporate donors who bankrolled the Republican tide that carried into office more than 50 new Republicans in the House, I would be wary of what you just bought. For no matter your view of President Obama, he effectively saved capitalism. And for that, he paid a terrible political price. Suppose you had $100,000 to invest on the day Barack Obama was inaugurated. Why bet on a liberal Democrat? Here’s why: the presidency ofGeorge W. Bush produced the worst stock market decline of any president in history. The net worth of American households collapsed as Bush slipped away. And if you needed a loan to buy a house or stay in business, private sector borrowing was dead when he handed over power.
We Must Take Postive Lessons From Kenya’s Women Only Elections
As we join the rest of the world in commemorating today, 8th March, as International Women’s Day, we wish to use this occasion to address the unacceptable issue of very low representation of women in governance and decision-making in Ghana and many other African countries and commend the great strides being made elsewhere on the continent. In spite of all the difficulties, we recognise the progress being made by the African woman, especially, in societies that are becoming somewhat gingerly tolerant against the pull of enduring prejudices.
The Tory party has lost sight of its true values
The latest polls will not make for happy reading in No 10. After a torrid post-Budget fortnight, Labour has a strong lead. If there was an election tomorrow, they would be returned with a big majority. In 43 years as a volunteer for the Tory party, I have always believed that the values of our activists have been at the heart of our electoral success. Yet, in recent times, there has been an almost evangelical focus on the “modernisation” or “detoxification” of the Conservative brand. The result has been a growing disconnect between the party leadership and the grassroots, and a loss of clarity, principle and policy direction.
Oil Receipts and National development
In less than a year the production of oil on the shores of Ghana would go live. Oil is always a commodity on demand. 85 million barrels is how much we consume everyday. Its effect on human life is like the force of gravity and the energy it provides goes to the very heart of the world economy. In spite of the threat from the green revolution, the global demand for oil energy is expected to double in the next three decades. This makes Ghana’s near entry into the oil industry a big thing for the people of this country. Though the start up production figures suggests Ghana would remain infant on the market for sometime to come, revenues accruing from oil production would be additional source of income for national development.
Decisions of the 15 African Union summit
This weekend, 30 to 31 January 2011, the heads of state of the African Union are holding their 16th AU summit in Addis Ababa. The 15th AU summit held in Kampala, Uganda, from 19 to 27 July, 2010, adopted the following decisions: On the Theme of the Summit: “Maternal, infant and child Health and Development in Africa” adopted actions to be undertaken in various Member State, in particular the actions aimed at attaining the MDGs 4, 5 and 6, including the launching of CARMMA, mobilisation of adequate resources for integrated health programmes up to 15% of national budgets, the sharing of best practices within regions, regular evaluation and reporting of progress achieved by Member States;
Ghana Sits on Borrowed Money & Borrowed Time
The World Bank Ghana Country Office’s Conference Room was the scene of lively discussions and startling revelations on Friday last week (18th June 2010). It emerged in a fascinating exchange between senior officials of the Ministry of Finance (past and present) and the country program manager of the Bank, Katherine Bain, that considerable amounts of monies approved for various projects in the country were still sitting idly in various accounts at the Ministry, several months after they were earmarked for disbursement towards critical development projects.