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Africa and the Arab Spring: A New Era of Democratic Expectations
2011 saw dramatic changes in Africa’s governance landscape. Unprecedented popular demonstrations in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya led to the overturning of a century of autocratic rule in North Africa.These protests, demanding greater political freedom, economic opportunity, and an end to systemic corruption, have resonated deeply across Africa, sparking calls for change throughout the continent. Already home to more of the world’s democratizing states than any other region, even modest reverberations from the Arab Spring on Africa’s democratic trajectory will have implications for global governance norms, stability, and development. Click here for report
Biometric verification in December polls will be
The Managing Editor of the Daily Dispatch newspaper, Ben Ephson has predicted it will be suicidal for the Electoral Commission to implement full electronic voter verification in the December elections. Ben Ephson served the warning on Accra-based Radio Gold’s Power Drive morning show on Wednesday and according to him, voter verification would not be a panacea to vote rigging or electoral fraud in the December 7 polls.
REPORT OF THE ELECTORAL REFORMS COMMITTEE SUBMITTED TO THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION OF THE REPUBLIC OF GHANA
We, members of the Electoral Reforms Committee wish to thank the almighty God for the strength, health and travelling mercies granted us throughout our various meetings, discussions and retreat sessions held outside Accra in executing our mandate as spelt out in our Terms of Reference. We thank the Chairman and Members of the Electoral Commission for giving us the opportunity to serve mother Ghana. To Mr Gabriel Pwamang the consultant to the Committee, we say: “...we are grateful to you for your assistance and for bringing your competence, expertise and legal acumen to bear on the work of the Committee.” Read more >>>
Death threats forced GREDA’s back-traction
The Ghana Real Estates Developers Association (GREDA) may have withdrawn its petition to Parliament on the STX housing deal because its executives were threatened with death. Source close to GREDA tell Joy News some members of the association also became worried that their contracts with government could be abrogated after the association criticized the proposed deal with the Korean company, but GREDA has declined to confirm or deny the reports.
AU must move away from automatic membership, says Akufo-Addo
The 2012 Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, says the African Union must move away from granting automatic membership to African countries solely based on geography but rather on the strict adherence to certain fundamental democratic principles. These democratic principles that member countries need to demonstrate, according to Nana Addo, include a commitment to strengthening and protecting the institutions and culture of democratic governance; respecting human rights, religious freedom, and the rights of the individual and minorities; building functioning market economies and facilitating the free movements of people, knowledge, goods and services across member states.
I must confess one of my favourite all-time calypso tracks is ‘Ugly Woman’, the Mighty Bomber version, originally written and performed by Roaring Lion in 1933, the calypsonian whose music career spanned 65 years. This hilarious song has Roaring Lion advising the world, “If you want to be happy, living a king’s life, never make a pretty woman your wife. All you got to do is just as I say. From a logical point of view, Always marry a woman uglier than you.” It is one of the best tracks ever composed and performed, I think. But, there is something about the song which may be lost on the listener as he or she enjoys it: it answers to a long-held prejudice that physically attractive women are sexually promiscuous and unfaithful. Well, certainly, it had no effect on me when it came to making a bridal choice.
NPP-USA: The Supreme Court Has Moral Responsibility To Save Ghana
NPP-USA would like to alert donor countries and the international community that Ghana’s fledgling democracy is on a political cliff. The corrupt NDC and its dubious stooges disguised as electoral commission officials have once again arrested Ghana’s democracy with very devastative ramifications. The fraudulent orchestration by the NDC, Afari Gyan’s Electoral Commission, and a surrogate Israeli company, STL, to hijack the will of the Ghanaian people to steal the elections for the corrupt, incompetent and morally bankrupt John Dramani Mahama and NDC parliamentarians has set Ghana on the slippery route to political instability.
US-Ghana relations in the past
Ghana has enjoyed a strong relationship with U.S. ever since the first American Peace Corps volunteers came to Ghana in 1961, the same year that President John F. Kennedy created the U.S. Agency for International Development (U.S.AID) to assist the developing world (aside from a blip in the mid-1980s during the Soussoudis spy affair). Indeed, the setting up of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of African Affairs in 1958 was largely informed by Ghana becoming the first black African nation to gain independence the previous year.
Parliamentary Strengthening and the Paris Principles: Ghana case study
In theory, parliaments are one of the key institutions of democracy, playing an important role in terms of legislation, oversight and representation. Regrettably, in many developing countries – as well as in many developed countries – parliaments are weak, ineffective and marginalised. Parliamentary strengthening aims to enhance the effectiveness of parliaments through institutional development, through building the capacity of parliamentary staff, MPs and committees, and through putting in place the nuts and bolts of infrastructure and equipment Click here for report
Foresight Africa: Implementing a New U.S.-Africa Policy
2013 ushered in the most significant change in the United States’ Africa policy since the passing of PEPFAR 10 years ago. The unveiling of investment-focused initiatives—Power Africa and Trade Africa—reflects not just a change in how the Obama administration views the continent, but also how foreign investors have prioritized it. But policy rarely achieves its objectives without equal attention to implementation. A number of implementation barriers—old regulations and new policies working at cross-purposes, and limited on-the-ground capacity—threaten to undermine America’s new approach to the continent in 2014. If 2013 was marked by change in U.S. strategy towards Africa, 2014 will be marked by the recognition that 90 percent of the success of that strategy is implementation.