Individual freedom is at the heart of the Danquah Institute’s philosophy, which takes as its basis the works and beliefs of Dr J.B. Danquah, who saw it as his duty "to liberate the energies of the people for the growth of a property-owning democracy in this land, with right to life, freedom and justice, as the principles to which the Government and laws of the land should be dedicated in order specifically to enrich life, property and liberty of each and every citizen."

The Danquah Institute adheres to the doctrine that the duty of the state is to guarantee to individuals substantive freedoms to make them active agents in their own individual development, and that by so doing we will achieve real and lasting national development for our people.

We therefore believe that supporting, promoting and protecting a competitive multi-party democracy in which freedoms flourish is vital for our development and will lead to better government acting in the interests of the people by creating an atmosphere in which government is most effectively scrutinised and held to account by the public, media and opposition politicians. We furthermore hold it to be true that subjecting the economy to market forces, with the active engagement of local people from positions of strength, is the most effective way of guaranteeing efficiency, innovation and wealth-creation for the benefit of the nation as a whole.

The Danquah Institute believes Africans must look more within and wider within for both their individual and collective advancement. We believe in the free movements of people, ideas, knowledge, technology, cultures, goods and services across Africa. The Danquah Institute believes that the regional blocs should be the most effective vehicles for achieving an integrated Africa, but that the regional blocs must operate with a common continental framework. In December 2, 1926, Dr. Danquah wrote, “You cannot make a nation of Africa [except] by securing unity in West Africa...” Dr Danquah, who reasoned that "by securing unity in West Africa, and by securing African rights in the Western portion, you thereby raise the general standard of African welfare..." for all to follow, saw regionalism as a more effective, practical way of achieving unity for the continent and that the strength of that regionalism would lie on the viability of its parts. Hence, his focus then on Ghana as a launching pad. The Danquah Institute believes the African private sector and civil society must not leave the integration process to the politicians to determine and drive its pace and scope.

The Danquah Institute shares a belief in these tenets with all adherents of the Danquah-Busia philosophy, but is nevertheless not an arm of any political party though they may share this dispensation.

Other Stories

This short overview report presents the main findings and recommendations of a larger study, prepared in early 2013, that is to be released shortly. We believe that it will help bring about policies and decisions that will ensure that Ghana’s emergence as a middle-income economy is not held back by the energy sector, as at present. We recommend that Government make a concerted effort to ‘think big’ and provide more direct and proactive leadership to the energy sector, given its centrality to boosting economic growth. The report was prepared during a period of electricity shortages and rolling power blackouts. The current power shortfall is particularly serious for two reasons: the frequency of these episodes is increasing – the previous one was just 5 years ago – and the economic damage inflicted is greater, because Ghana’s economy has evolved to become ever more dependent on reliable electricity supply. This review identifies three themes that are common to Ghana’s power and petroleum sectors.
Nkrumah's Celebration Renews Age-Old Debate
The declaration of September 21 as statutory public holiday in honour of Ghana’s first President, Osagyefo Dr Kwame Nkrumah, has renewed an age-old debate between adherents of the two dominant political traditions in the country regarding the appropriateness of celebrating Nkrumah as the sole founder of the nation.The debate was carried to the campus of the University of Ghana, Legon,Thursday, during which faithful of the Danquah/Busia tradition argued that it was better to honour all those who contributed to the cause of independence than just one person, while advocates of the Nkrumaist tradition justified the honour bestowed on Nkrumah because he stood tallest amongst the rest in the struggle for independence.
Amending The Constitution Of Ghana: Is The Imperial President Trespassing?
In January 2010, Ghana‘s President John Atta Mills appointed a commission to review and propose amendments to the country‘s current constitution, in force since 1993.1 The ―constitutional instrument establishing the commission tasked the nine-member body2 to ―ascertain from the people of Ghana, their views on the operation of the constitution, and in particular its strength and weaknesses, articulate the concerns of the people on amendments that might be required for a comprehensive review and make recommendations to government for consideration. A Ministry of Justice document setting forth the administration‘s agenda for constitutional reform identifies about forty specific provisions and omissions in the constitution as likely candidates for review and amendment, and the commission is directed to consider these pre-identified issues in its review. By its terms of reference, the commission‘s final work product must include ―a draft Bill for possible amendments to the constitution. more >>>
Parliamentarians from around the world met in the Chamber of the Canadian House of Commons October 13–16, 2002, and formed the Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC). At this meeting, corruption was identified as the greatest threat to the democratic ideal of self-government, endangering representative institutions selected in free elections by a broadly enfranchised people. Corruption was not only seen as a threat to democracy but also perceived to undermine economic development, violate social justice, and destroy trust in state institutions. In addition, if most commentators were right, corruption is getting worse in many countries and becoming an increasingly widespread phenomenon.
A victory for Fraud?
Unlike Nana Akufo-Addo, I am not the least bit disappointed that our Supreme Court would affirm the fraudulent declaration of Mr. John Dramani Mahama as winner of the 2012 election. (See "Akufo-Addo: 'I Disagree with SC's Verdict but I Accept'" Ghanaweb.com 8/29/13).I am not disappointed because I am also not the least bit surprised. For going into the Election 2012 Petition, I emphatically stated that unless the panel of jurists adjudicating the petition were drawn from outside Ghana, I did not see much by way of a favorable ruling for those with the most forensically sustainable evidence. And so in quite a practical sense, I have been vindicated in my prediction.
Decisions of the 15 African Union summit
This weekend, 30 to 31 January 2011, the heads of state of the African Union are holding their 16th AU summit in Addis Ababa. The 15th AU summit held in Kampala, Uganda, from 19 to 27 July, 2010, adopted the following decisions: On the Theme of the Summit: “Maternal, infant and child Health and Development in Africa” adopted actions to be undertaken in various Member State, in particular the actions aimed at attaining the MDGs 4, 5 and 6, including the launching of CARMMA, mobilisation of adequate resources for integrated health programmes up to 15% of national budgets, the sharing of best practices within regions, regular evaluation and reporting of progress achieved by Member States;
Some Thoughts From Gabby On The Election Petition
The respondents in Ghana’s presidential election petition are, in short, saying, “Yes, we admit there were irregularities, but, whatever they are, whether over-voting, unknown polling stations or voting without biometric verification, they must be seen as nothing more than clerical, administrative or transpositional errors which must not affect votes cast by Ghanaians.”
US-Ghana relations in the past
Ghana has enjoyed a strong relationship with U.S. ever since the first American Peace Corps volunteers came to Ghana in 1961, the same year that President John F. Kennedy created the U.S. Agency for International Development (U.S.AID) to assist the developing world (aside from a blip in the mid-1980s during the Soussoudis spy affair). Indeed, the setting up of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of African Affairs in 1958 was largely informed by Ghana becoming the first black African nation to gain independence the previous year.
Freedom  is indivisible
It is not possible to have liberty for some and not for others in the same country. Whilst blacks were being oppressed by apartheid in South Africa, the liberty of whites was being compromised by the measures necessary to suppress the aspirations of their fellow citizens (actually non citizens). Recently I reread Martin Luther King’s great “I have a dream” speech. I was again moved and inspired by its central message: a call for liberty for all Americans. King was not asking for the playing field to be tilted the other way. He was not asking for special privileges for black Americans so as to right the wrongs of the past. He knew that for liberty to prevail, the law should treat everyone the same; that there is no liberty for one unless there is equality before the law for all.
Election 2012 petition verdict: Judgement of JSC Ansah
The facts surrounding this suit have been fully played out in near epic dimensions before the public. However, there is no way this suit can be seen as a likeness of the numerous cases on various aspects of our 1992 Constitution. Indeed, I venture to say it cannot be compared to any of the cases touching on various aspects of all our previous Constitutions.