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Individual freedom is at the heart of the Danquah Institute’s philosophy, which takes as its basis the works and beliefs of Dr J.B. Danquah, who saw it as his duty "to liberate the energies of the people for the growth of a property-owning democracy in this land, with right to life, freedom and justice, as the principles to which the Government and laws of the land should be dedicated in order specifically to enrich life, property and liberty of each and every citizen."

The Danquah Institute adheres to the doctrine that the duty of the state is to guarantee to individuals substantive freedoms to make them active agents in their own individual development, and that by so doing we will achieve real and lasting national development for our people.

We therefore believe that supporting, promoting and protecting a competitive multi-party democracy in which freedoms flourish is vital for our development and will lead to better government acting in the interests of the people by creating an atmosphere in which government is most effectively scrutinised and held to account by the public, media and opposition politicians. We furthermore hold it to be true that subjecting the economy to market forces, with the active engagement of local people from positions of strength, is the most effective way of guaranteeing efficiency, innovation and wealth-creation for the benefit of the nation as a whole.

The Danquah Institute believes Africans must look more within and wider within for both their individual and collective advancement. We believe in the free movements of people, ideas, knowledge, technology, cultures, goods and services across Africa. The Danquah Institute believes that the regional blocs should be the most effective vehicles for achieving an integrated Africa, but that the regional blocs must operate with a common continental framework. In December 2, 1926, Dr. Danquah wrote, “You cannot make a nation of Africa [except] by securing unity in West Africa...” Dr Danquah, who reasoned that "by securing unity in West Africa, and by securing African rights in the Western portion, you thereby raise the general standard of African welfare..." for all to follow, saw regionalism as a more effective, practical way of achieving unity for the continent and that the strength of that regionalism would lie on the viability of its parts. Hence, his focus then on Ghana as a launching pad. The Danquah Institute believes the African private sector and civil society must not leave the integration process to the politicians to determine and drive its pace and scope.

The Danquah Institute shares a belief in these tenets with all adherents of the Danquah-Busia philosophy, but is nevertheless not an arm of any political party though they may share this dispensation.

Other Stories

Oct. 22 (Bloomberg) -- Cnooc Ltd., China’s largest offshore oil producer, and Ghana National Petroleum Corp. made a $5- billion bid to buy Kosmos Energy LLC’s assets in the West African country, including its stake in the Jubilee field, according to three people with knowledge of the matter. The all-cash, fully financed bid, the first from the Cnooc- Ghana National group, was received about two weeks ago, said the people, who declined to be identified as the talks are private.
Report of the Constitution Review Commission
The Constitution Review Commission, a presidential Commission of Inquiry, was set up in January 2010 to consult with the people of Ghana on the operation of the 1992 Constitution and on any changes that need to be made to the Constitution. The Commission was also tasked to present a draft bill for the amendment of the Constitution in the event that any changes are warranted. Click here for full report
Electronic Voting: If India can do it, so can Ghana! Says DI
Following the announcement of results of India’s national election this weekend, the Danquah Institute has hailed the successful conclusion of electronic voting in the world’s largest democracy and called on Ghana’s Electoral Commission to consider the numerous benefits of electronic voting as demonstrated in this latest poll.During the month of April, an estimated 714 million Indians cast their vote, from the huge metropolises of Delhi and Mumbai down to the tiny village of Banej where just one man was registered to vote.
Site for Upper West Regional hospital covered by weeds
A visit to the proposed site for the construction of the Upper West Regional Hospital, in Wa, by Dr. Mahamudu Bawumia and a team of media men indicates that nearly two years after the sod was cut for construction of the Hospital to begin, not even a single block has been laid on the site.Despite assurances by President Mahama almost three months ago that funding had been fully secured for construction of the hospital to begin, and the project completed within a few months, the site for the proposed hospital has been completely taken over by weeds.
Danquah Institute Press Conference: Halt
Good afternoon ladies and Gentlemen of the press. Thank you for coming on such short notice. There’s a Ghanaian saying which goes like” Obaa a onim s3 onky3 wo aware ase no, otu bankye aa, ondua” akin to saying literally; that a lady whose days in her marital home are numbered, does not bother to re-plant uprooted cassava. 
WASHINGTON, March 31, 2011 The Government of Ghana over the past one week has been granted a total of US$295 million by the World Bank Board to support its developmental process. The Land Administration Project-2 (US$50m) was approved today, March 31 2011; whilst the Skills and Technology Development Project (US70m) and Local Government Capacity Support Project (US$175m) were approved on March 29th and March 22nd , 2011 respectively.
"The court in the execution of its duty to protect the citizen's liberty always proceeds on the well-known principle, at any rate as acknowledged in democratic countries, of the primary necessity in the administration of the law to establish a healthy balance between the need to protect the community against crime and the need to protect individual citizens against abuse of executive power. Subject to the limits imposed on this twofold protection by the establishment and maintenance of the requisite balance, the scales are to be held evenly, at any rate in normal times, between the community, that is the State and the individual and there can be no question of 'leaning over backward,' so to speak, to favour the State at the expense of the citizen or to favour the citizen at the expense of the community. And the courts' vigilance in protecting the citizen against any encroachments on his liberty by the executive becomes meaningful and real only when pursued on the basis of this principle." Chief Justice Akufo-Addo, Ex Parte Braimah.
“Building a society of aspirations and opportunities in Ghana – the path to prosperity” Speech delivered by Nana Addo-Dankwa Akufo-Addo at the 1st liberty lecture
{enclose Akufo-AddoLibertySpeech082011.mp3} The Danquah Institute is to be warmly commended for initiating what hopefully will be these annual lectures, and I thank them most sincerely for giving me the honour of delivering the first in the series. The Institute had originally scheduled this lecture to be held on 4th August to commemorate the special significance of that date in our nation’s history and thereby provide the rationale for these Liberty Lectures. Click here for full speech
A growing number of sub-Saharan African countries – South Africa, Tanzania, Kenya, Botswana, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, and more recently, Ghana – now require that the Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) card in a mobile phone be tied to the user’s name. The main reason: to combat crime. But I am afraid that with its narrow rationale and focus, this exercise misses the big picture; i.e., a golden opportunity to develop a good database that could become the building blocks for stronger institutions and economic transformation. Cross-country growth studies show that strong institutions are the surest bet out of this quagmire, a fact that has been echoed several times by Prince Kofi Amoabeng, CEO of UT Bank and arguably, the most-respected CEO in Ghana. When asked in a recent interview on how to reform the institutions, Mr. Amoabeng emphasized the role of information. “We have to go back to the basics. Information about the people, proper home and business addresses; proper identification make it possible to collect appropriate taxes that will fund projects,” he added. But developing good institutions, when powers that be benefit from its absence, is not going to be easy. Sure, a fixed-address system will help, but you only need to take one look at Accra, not to mention smaller towns/villages, to realize that street addressing remains a dream for now.
Ghana pays a premium as it sells $750 mln 10-year Eurobond
Ghana sold a $750 million 10-year Eurobond on Thursday in its second foray into international bond markets but paid a premium to investors wary of its fiscal and current account deficits.The West African producer of cocoa, gold and oil issued the bond at a yield of 8 percent. The order book was $2.2 billion, around three times the issue size, Finance Minister Seth Terkper told Reuters.