The Danquah Institute regards itself as guardians and ambassadors of the political and economic thought known as liberalism and how its promotion must benefit Africa and the African as members of the greater global community.

We seek through our work to advance Danquah’s beliefs in individual freedom, rule of law, multi-party democracy, liberal economics and equality of opportunity and ensure they inform the actions of the democratically-elected Government of Ghana and governments of other African states.

Through the examination, evaluation, publication and promotion of alternative and novel policy approaches based on these principles, together with a critical analysis of existing political prescriptions, we aim to improve the quality of the decision-making process and the efficaciousness of social, political and economic policies in Ghana and other African states.

Our intention is to make a courageous, imaginative, constructive and co-ordinated contribution to nation-building and Africa's development in general, with the purpose of enhancing the life of every individual citizen and, through this, the development of the Ghanaian, Ghana, the African and Africa.

We shall actively seek to promote our ideas, principles, values and ideals within Ghana and the African continent. In subscribing diligently, explicitly and conscientiously to those values of democracy, rule of law, human rights, free movements of people, ideas, cultures, knowledge, technology, goods and services, we can strengthen the building up of the power of Africa as an economic and peaceful, self disciplined and cooperative community of opportunities and individual liberties, a force of reason and initiative to be reckoned with and emulated in the global arena.

We will achieve this through:

Public advocacy of ideas and philosophy of J.B. Danquah, particularly amongst Ghana’s youth.
Research into governance, economic and media issues.
Publication of research papers, seminar proceedings and a periodic journal, the DI Quarterly.
Organisation of seminal events to provide a forum to debate and evaluate policy prescriptions.
Networking with other like-minded think tanks and organisations across the African continent.

Other Stories

Stakeholders endorse Indian Electronic Voting Model
Stakeholders at the recently held conference on Biometric Voter Registration and E-Voting in Ghana overwhelmingly endorsed the Indian model of Electronic Voting as the model that is adequately suited to the Ghanaian terrain should Ghana decide to introduce technology into her elections. This was made known at the just ended 2-day conference organised by the Danquah Institute, a policy think tank based in Accra. The Conference drew participants from government, political parties, the Electoral Commission, civil society organisations, media houses, local and international experts on e-voting systems, development partners and Ghanaians interested in this subject area.
How Ghana must utilise its new strategic importance
With the discovery of significant oil potential offshore, Ghana has not only new international importance – we also have cause for greater confidence and strength in our global interactions. The increased interest of both China and the United States in Ghana can add extraordinary oomph to Ghana’s development – but this can only happen if we become smarter, more strategic and more assertive in our dealings with these two powerful nations.
The Relevance of the Monetary Policy Rate in the Monetary Transmission Mechanism
In May 2007 the Bank of Ghana formally adopted inflation targeting (IT) as the framework for stabilizing prices within the economy. Since then, significant progress has been made in developing the policy framework as well as the institutions and markets that underpin its implementation – money and capital markets have been developed, there is a framework for forecasting liquidity, and a broad range of instruments with which to conduct monetary policy is available Click here for full report
If I were one of the big corporate donors who bankrolled the Republican tide that carried into office more than 50 new Republicans in the House, I would be wary of what you just bought. For no matter your view of President Obama, he effectively saved capitalism. And for that, he paid a terrible political price. Suppose you had $100,000 to invest on the day Barack Obama was inaugurated. Why bet on a liberal Democrat? Here’s why: the presidency ofGeorge W. Bush produced the worst stock market decline of any president in history. The net worth of American households collapsed as Bush slipped away. And if you needed a loan to buy a house or stay in business, private sector borrowing was dead when he handed over power.
Report of the Constitution Review Commission
The Constitution Review Commission, a presidential Commission of Inquiry, was set up in January 2010 to consult with the people of Ghana on the operation of the 1992 Constitution and on any changes that need to be made to the Constitution. The Commission was also tasked to present a draft bill for the amendment of the Constitution in the event that any changes are warranted. Click here for full report
I was glad to read the announcement made by World Bank President, Dr. Jim Kim, at the start of this year’s UN General Assembly meetings, about the Bank’s projected financing support through the end of 2015 to help developing countries reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and children’s health. As we move toward the culmination of the MDGs in 2015 and beyond, preventing maternal and child deaths should be seen by all government delegations and their partners in the international development community as a clear yardstick to measure their commitment for creating more just and inclusive societies. But as evidence has shown across the globe, to effectively address the insidiousness of this challenge, a broad multi-sectoral paradigm for action is needed. In some countries, particularly in resource-poor settings and among certain population groups, there are social and cultural norms that need to be better understood to deal with myths and misconceptions surrounding pregnancy, childbirth and proper care of the newborn. There are also geographical barriers, as in rural communities high in the Andean mountains of my native Ecuador, or in the Caucasus mountain range in Georgia and Azerbaijan, where the poor state of roads in a challenging terrain, or the unavailability of transport to a health facility, contribute to preventable maternal deaths.
Vigilance is the Motto for December 7
Next week Ghanaians will go to the polls to choose who they want to lead them for the next four years. The patriotic call to all communities across the country is simply this: Take it upon yourself, peacefully and legitimately, to protect your ballot, to protect your mandate, to protect your democracy, and to protect your nation. We of the Danquah Institute would be remiss if we claimed not to share the same concern about the politics in Ghana becoming as divisive as they have been over the last several months. However, the Danquah Institute stands together with those tirelessly working to maintain peace and ensure that Ghana remains a free and fair democracy.
Africa’s tax systems: progress, but what is the next generation of reforms?
Taxation is zipping up the development agenda, but the discussion is often focussed on international aspects such as tax havens or the Robin Hood Tax. Both very important, but arguably, even more important is what happens domestically – are developing country tax systems regressive or progressive? Are they raising enough cash to fund state services? Are they efficient and free of corruption? This absolutely magisterial overview of the state of tax systems in Africa comes from Mick Moore (right), who runs the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD). It was first published by the Africa Research Institute. Anglophone countries have led the way in reforming tax administration in Africa, considerably more so than their francophone peers. The reasons for this are numerous. Networks of international tax specialists are based mainly in English-speaking countries. Many of the modern systems that promote best practice within tax authorities were developed in anglophone countries, especially Australia. International donors, and particularly the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), have directly and indirectly promoted a lot of reform of national tax authorities. In fact, this has been one of the success stories of British aid.
The Mind of Empire: China’s History and Modern Foreign Relations
With an economy and population that dwarf most industrialized nations, China is emerging as a twenty-first-century global superpower. Even though China is an international leader in modern business and technology, its ancient history exerts a powerful force on its foreign policy. In The Mind of Empire: China’s History and Modern Foreign Relations, Christopher A. Ford expertly traces China’s self-image and its role in the world order from the age of Confucius to today. Ford argues that despite its exposure to and experience of the modern world, China is still strongly influenced by a hierarchical view of political order and is only comfortable with foreign relationships that reinforce its self-perception of political and moral supremacy. Recounting how this attitude has clashed with the Western notion of separate and coequal state sovereignty, Ford speculates–and offers a warning–about how China’s legacy will continue to shape its foreign relations. more >>>
NPP fears EC disaster in biometric registration
The Chairman of the opposition New Patriotic Party, Jake Obetsebi-Lamptey, has expressed his party’s deep sense of apprehension about the secretive and silent manner with which the Electoral Commission is conducting affairs towards the 2012 elections, describing it as a recipe for disaster. In light of this, Jake has stated emphatically that the NPP would not be a supporter of the flawed and opaque process the Electoral Commission is currently embarking on in handling the impending Biometric Voter Registration exercise.