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The Danquah Institute regards itself as guardians and ambassadors of the political and economic thought known as liberalism and how its promotion must benefit Africa and the African as members of the greater global community.

We seek through our work to advance Danquah’s beliefs in individual freedom, rule of law, multi-party democracy, liberal economics and equality of opportunity and ensure they inform the actions of the democratically-elected Government of Ghana and governments of other African states.

Through the examination, evaluation, publication and promotion of alternative and novel policy approaches based on these principles, together with a critical analysis of existing political prescriptions, we aim to improve the quality of the decision-making process and the efficaciousness of social, political and economic policies in Ghana and other African states.

Our intention is to make a courageous, imaginative, constructive and co-ordinated contribution to nation-building and Africa's development in general, with the purpose of enhancing the life of every individual citizen and, through this, the development of the Ghanaian, Ghana, the African and Africa.

We shall actively seek to promote our ideas, principles, values and ideals within Ghana and the African continent. In subscribing diligently, explicitly and conscientiously to those values of democracy, rule of law, human rights, free movements of people, ideas, cultures, knowledge, technology, goods and services, we can strengthen the building up of the power of Africa as an economic and peaceful, self disciplined and cooperative community of opportunities and individual liberties, a force of reason and initiative to be reckoned with and emulated in the global arena.

We will achieve this through:

Public advocacy of ideas and philosophy of J.B. Danquah, particularly amongst Ghana’s youth.
Research into governance, economic and media issues.
Publication of research papers, seminar proceedings and a periodic journal, the DI Quarterly.
Organisation of seminal events to provide a forum to debate and evaluate policy prescriptions.
Networking with other like-minded think tanks and organisations across the African continent.

Other Stories

Petitioners Prove No Double Counting In Analysis, Releases Full List Of 11,138 Polling Stations Under Contention
The Petitioners, Thursday evening, released the full list of the 11,138 polling stations which contain violations, omissions, malpractices and irregularities for which they are asking the Supreme Court to annul. The list which details the polling station name, polling station code, pink sheet serial number of polling station, votes secured by the various parties in those polling stations and the particular irregularities which affected voting and the outcome of elections in those polling stations, proves the Petitioners case that there is no double counting of polling stations in the analysis of the number of votes and polling stations which should be annulled from the declared result of the 2012 Elections.
We Must Take Postive Lessons From Kenya’s Women Only Elections
As we join the rest of the world in commemorating today, 8th March, as International Women’s Day, we wish to use this occasion to address the unacceptable issue of very low representation of women in governance and decision-making in Ghana and many other African countries and commend the great strides being made elsewhere on the continent. In spite of all the difficulties, we recognise the progress being made by the African woman, especially, in societies that are becoming somewhat gingerly tolerant against the pull of enduring prejudices.
In 1956, France implemented a series of institutional reforms that effectively allowed its African colonies to opt for integration with France instead of pursuing autonomous existence as independent states. Just two years later, France, under the leadership of Charles de Gaulle, offered the colonies, under the auspices of the Constitution of the French Fifth Republic, free association as autonomous republics within the Communauté française (French Community). Guinea was the only territory in France’s so-called Afrique noire to vote “Non” to de Gaulle’s proposal. Ivory Coast voted “Oui” as its elites saw Guinea’s total rejection of de Gaulle’s offer as not very pragmatic. Of course, within the new community, France would retain senior status and the former colonies would come in as junior partners. Nevertheless, leaders of the Francophone African colonies soon realized that they could opt for independence and still retain close and productive ties with France. Thus, following the lead of the former UN Trust Territory of Cameroons under French administration, which gained independence on January 1, 1960, Ivory Coast withdrew from the French Community and on August 7, 1960, declared its independence. However, it was not until October 31, 1960 that the National Assembly adopted a constitutional draft.
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The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity. ~ William Butler Yeats Do politicians ever think of the kind of life the average Ghanaian 'worker' lives? Not even the unemployed - the one who has a job -- any kind of job. Take the mother who operates a small table-top 'shop' or any mother who buys and sells, micro scale -- hours upon hours a day, rain or shine, with a baby tied to her spine. She does so giving 24-hour care to her toddler; if she's lucky her 8-year-old daughter may come and help her out, while she takes time off to cook for other members of the family and back to selling; in the heat, fighting off flies amid the fumes and vrooms of modernity.
Unemployment is world's fastest-rising fear - survey
Unemployment is the world's fastest-rising worry, a BBC World Service survey covering 11,000 people in 23 countries suggests. The annual poll, called The World Speaks, gave people a list of concerns and asked which they had discussed with friends or family in the past month. Corruption and poverty still ranked the highest, but unemployment was mentioned by 18% - six times the rate citing it in the first survey in 2009.
"It's not he who casts the votes that matters -- but he who counts the votes." -Joseph Stalin President Obama’s visit to Ghana earlier this year, gave us all as Ghanaians deep pride in our country and in our international reputation. That our small West African nation was chosen as the first in the whole continent to be so honoured since Obama took power was the result of an achievement we have built as a whole people since 1992 in not only the reborn of democracy but successfully warring off the infant mortality that has put paid to too many of our continental contemporaries.
$600 Million pumped into election 2012
As Ghana nears the 2012 General Elections, the political discourse appears to have been enriched with the general citizenry pitching their voices on matters that concern them. On TV, Radio and Online, the cry for responsible and accountable leadership is dominating political discussions with people from all walks of life- getting involved through interactive media, texts and phone-ins.
Has Mills lost touch with honesty?
President Mills returned from New York on New Year’s Eve to say that his Christmas trip was so successful that he had “killed two birds with one stone.” He didn’t exactly manage Zita Okaikoi’s feat of “killing two stones with one bird” on her trip to New York, where she had a baby and attended to some tourism duties. Our President, essentially, took an early holiday in New York in order to work during the Christmas break in New York. Bless him! Koku Anyidoho, reportedly, briefed journalists at the Kotoka International Airport on Christmas Eve, the day of Mills’ surprise departure, saying that the President was returning to America, a week after his last trip there, to follow-up with some US investors he met at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).
ECOWAS must Not Give up on Diplomacy on Cote D'ivoire
Ghana is presently caught in the whirlwind of Africa’s latest political quagmire: the post-election turmoil in Ivory Coast. President Mills has decided against sending Ghanaian soldiers as part of an ECOWAS-superintended military force to oust the ostensibly recalcitrant Laurent Gbagbo. The Ghanaian president’s bold decision to reject a regional plan to employ military action against the leadership of a fellow sovereign African nation-state is the right one, even if the reasons the nation’s public servant numero uno has given his fellow Ghanaians and the international community are not tenable.