The Danquah Institute regards itself as guardians and ambassadors of the political and economic thought known as liberalism and how its promotion must benefit Africa and the African as members of the greater global community.

We seek through our work to advance Danquah’s beliefs in individual freedom, rule of law, multi-party democracy, liberal economics and equality of opportunity and ensure they inform the actions of the democratically-elected Government of Ghana and governments of other African states.

Through the examination, evaluation, publication and promotion of alternative and novel policy approaches based on these principles, together with a critical analysis of existing political prescriptions, we aim to improve the quality of the decision-making process and the efficaciousness of social, political and economic policies in Ghana and other African states.

Our intention is to make a courageous, imaginative, constructive and co-ordinated contribution to nation-building and Africa's development in general, with the purpose of enhancing the life of every individual citizen and, through this, the development of the Ghanaian, Ghana, the African and Africa.

We shall actively seek to promote our ideas, principles, values and ideals within Ghana and the African continent. In subscribing diligently, explicitly and conscientiously to those values of democracy, rule of law, human rights, free movements of people, ideas, cultures, knowledge, technology, goods and services, we can strengthen the building up of the power of Africa as an economic and peaceful, self disciplined and cooperative community of opportunities and individual liberties, a force of reason and initiative to be reckoned with and emulated in the global arena.

We will achieve this through:

Public advocacy of ideas and philosophy of J.B. Danquah, particularly amongst Ghana’s youth.
Research into governance, economic and media issues.
Publication of research papers, seminar proceedings and a periodic journal, the DI Quarterly.
Organisation of seminal events to provide a forum to debate and evaluate policy prescriptions.
Networking with other like-minded think tanks and organisations across the African continent.

Other Stories

Leadership Paralysis, EIU Analysis, and the Anas Principle against Corruption
Last Saturday, in far away Houston, Texas, Nana Akufo-Addo was uncompromising in describing President JEA Mills’ four-year term as a period of wasted opportunities. He called on Ghanaians to replace the government of “lies, propaganda, hypocrisy, incompetence, corruption and economic hardships.” Nana Addo told the town hall meeting of Ghanaians the frustrating truth, “Ghana is, indeed, blessed by God. What is required is a competent leader to do something for people and country with what Heaven has bestowed.”
REPORT OF THE ELECTORAL REFORMS COMMITTEE SUBMITTED TO THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION OF THE REPUBLIC OF GHANA
We, members of the Electoral Reforms Committee wish to thank the almighty God for the strength, health and travelling mercies granted us throughout our various meetings, discussions and retreat sessions held outside Accra in executing our mandate as spelt out in our Terms of Reference. We thank the Chairman and Members of the Electoral Commission for giving us the opportunity to serve mother Ghana. To Mr Gabriel Pwamang the consultant to the Committee, we say: “...we are grateful to you for your assistance and for bringing your competence, expertise and legal acumen to bear on the work of the Committee.” Read more >>>
Some Thoughts From Gabby On The Election Petition
The respondents in Ghana’s presidential election petition are, in short, saying, “Yes, we admit there were irregularities, but, whatever they are, whether over-voting, unknown polling stations or voting without biometric verification, they must be seen as nothing more than clerical, administrative or transpositional errors which must not affect votes cast by Ghanaians.”
The Construction Pioneers (CP) Settlement Amounts – The Issues and the Payments
We have invited you here to talk to you about the ninety-four million euro (94,000,000 Euros) settlement money given to Construction Pioneers (CP). The former Attorney-General has issued a statement in which she seeks to absolve herself from blame. Further, the NDC tabloids have been striving, albeit vainly to establish that the payment of settlement amounts to CP has arisen out of negligence or lack of action by the NPP administration. This media encounter is meant to disembowel the (Government of Ghana) GoG – CP saga and let the good people of Ghana know the sequence of events. Click here for full statement
Press Release: Govt Can Appoint an Independent Prosecutor Now
The Danquah Institute, a governance think tank, has charged the Government of Ghana to go ahead and implement the ruling party’s manifesto pledge to set up an independent prosecution service “now without shielding behind the unnecessary pretext of a constitutional amendment.” The Executive Director of DI, Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, made this statement Wednesday evening at public lectures on international corruption delivered by UK barrister and expert on internal criminal law, John Hardy, QC, and renowned criminologist, Prof Ken Attafuah at the K.A Busia Hall, University of Ghana, Legon.
DI: Use Wulensi by-election as pilot exercise  for biometric register and verification
The Danquah Institute has learnt with some regret the news that the Electoral Commission intends to use the old 2008 voters' register for the upcoming July 31 Wulensi by-election. We write to encourage the EC to have a rethink and proactively take the opportunity that this unexpected by-election represents to use Wulensi as a pilot test for the new technology of using a biometric voters' list and biometric verification system for our general elections.
Abstract Justice delayed, they say, is justice denied. Delay in the dispensation of electoral disputes in Nigeria has become an albatross to the Nigerian nation. It has become a sour point in our electoral process. In this article, the writer meticulously looked at the various strategies and procedures for expediting election petitions and appeals in our electoral system. Introduction The general saying is that justice delayed is justice denied, and section 36 (1) of the constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (as amended) gives to every person the right to have his civil rights and obligations determined by a court after a fair hearing and within a reasonable time. For clarity, the sub-section reads: Full Document
Mobile phone portability: A freedom to choose, the Ghanaian mobile community must reject
July 1 2011 now has another reason to be celebrated as a day of final celebration from the serfdom of rulers, when as true REPUBLICANS, we affirm our belief in OBIARA YE OBIARA and we are all well and truly equal before MAN & GOD. For those still wondering what I am on about, July 1 2011 was the day when MOBILE PHONE PORTABILITY formally arrived in Ghana(unless that is, like its twin sibling, SIM REGISTRATION, its debut has also been put back by another 3 months).
32 Questions for Waterville
I am not a journalist. I was not present at the Waterville press conference. I don’t know if any questions were allowed, and if so whether any were asked. But I have read news stories of the press statement and heard snippets on radio. But these are questions that I would have asked if I had had the privilege of being present at the press conference. Yes, I know that it would not have been feasible to ask 32 questions, but here they are any way. Maybe, these are questions that the Police have asked, or should be asking Waterville.
IMF Concludes Article IV Consultation Mission to Ghana
A mission from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), led by Christina Daseking, visited Accra during April 2-12, 2013, to conduct discussions for the 2013 Article IV consultations. The mission met with President Mahama, Vice-President Amissah-Arthur, Finance Minister Terkper, Bank of Ghana Governor Wampah, other senior officials, members of parliament, and representatives of the private sector, think tanks, trade unions, and civil society. At the end of the mission, Ms. Daseking issued the following statement: “Economic growth continued at a robust pace of 8 percent in 2012 amid rising fiscal and external imbalances. A growing public sector wage bill, costly energy subsidies, and higher interest cost, pushed the fiscal deficit to about 12 percent of GDP. The external current account deficit also widened to 12 percent of GDP, while unadjusted fuel and energy prices and a tightening of monetary policy helped keep inflation in single digits.