Individual freedom is at the heart of the Danquah Institute’s philosophy, which takes as its basis the works and beliefs of Dr J.B. Danquah, who saw it as his duty "to liberate the energies of the people for the growth of a property-owning democracy in this land, with right to life, freedom and justice, as the principles to which the Government and laws of the land should be dedicated in order specifically to enrich life, property and liberty of each and every citizen."

The Danquah Institute adheres to the doctrine that the duty of the state is to guarantee to individuals substantive freedoms to make them active agents in their own individual development, and that by so doing we will achieve real and lasting national development for our people.

We therefore believe that supporting, promoting and protecting a competitive multi-party democracy in which freedoms flourish is vital for our development and will lead to better government acting in the interests of the people by creating an atmosphere in which government is most effectively scrutinised and held to account by the public, media and opposition politicians. We furthermore hold it to be true that subjecting the economy to market forces, with the active engagement of local people from positions of strength, is the most effective way of guaranteeing efficiency, innovation and wealth-creation for the benefit of the nation as a whole.

The Danquah Institute believes Africans must look more within and wider within for both their individual and collective advancement. We believe in the free movements of people, ideas, knowledge, technology, cultures, goods and services across Africa. The Danquah Institute believes that the regional blocs should be the most effective vehicles for achieving an integrated Africa, but that the regional blocs must operate with a common continental framework. In December 2, 1926, Dr. Danquah wrote, “You cannot make a nation of Africa [except] by securing unity in West Africa...” Dr Danquah, who reasoned that "by securing unity in West Africa, and by securing African rights in the Western portion, you thereby raise the general standard of African welfare..." for all to follow, saw regionalism as a more effective, practical way of achieving unity for the continent and that the strength of that regionalism would lie on the viability of its parts. Hence, his focus then on Ghana as a launching pad. The Danquah Institute believes the African private sector and civil society must not leave the integration process to the politicians to determine and drive its pace and scope.

The Danquah Institute shares a belief in these tenets with all adherents of the Danquah-Busia philosophy, but is nevertheless not an arm of any political party though they may share this dispensation.

Other Stories

OIL DEAL FROM EQUATORIAL GUINEA: IS IT 65,000 BARRELS A DAY OR 5,500?
In the last five months alone, President J E A Mills has made two 3-day official trips to Equatorial Guinea and has on both occasions returned to Ghana with news of striking significantly different crude oil deals with his Equatorial Guinean counterpart, President Theodore Nguema Mbasogo. The Danquah Institute is also extremely disturbed by moves by the Government of Ghana to rescue a Korean company that is US$6.3 billion in debt, whilst thousands of Ghanaian companies are also in distress and would require only a fraction of that amount to stimulate them back into productivity and profitability. more >>>
DI wants $3bn ‘illegal’ CDB loan cancelled and cured
The Danquah Institute has described the $3 billion China Development Bank loan contracted by the Mills-Mahama led National Democratic Congress government as an illegality as it breaches sections of the Petroleum Revenue Management Act passed by parliament this year. DI is therefore calling for the cancellation and subsequent curing of this loan facility and has urged the parties to the contract to take note of this and proceed to cure it or proceed to their own detriment.
Speech on
Mr. Chairman, (Dr. Charles Mensa) thank you, it is a real honour to be given this opportunity to contribute to the William Ofori-Atta Centenary Celebration Lectures to honour a truly outstanding Christian Statesman and patriot – Paa Willie. A man described as the best president Ghana never had; a righteous man, my hero and my hope that through his legacy and inspiration we can as a people be committed to establishing a prosperous society in our generation, which he defined in his political party’s (United National Convention) one year anniversary message in January 1980 Read More
HON. OSEI KYEI-MENSAH-BONSU TO ADDRESS 3RD LIBERTY LECTURE
The Danquah Institute will on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 hold its 3rd edition of its flagship event, the Liberty Lecture, with the Minority Leader in Parliament, Hon. Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu delivering a paper on the theme “The Deficit in Parliamentary Scrutiny in the Fight Against Corruption”. The lecture takes place at the Auditorium of the British Council at 5:00pm.
Akufo-Addo offers Transformational Leadership to Build a New, Industrial Economy
Ghana’s main opposition party, the New Patriotic Party, is preparing to launch its 2012 Manifesto on Saturday, August 25. But, before then, The New Statesman can reveal, exclusively, that the document lays out a detailed programme on how to transform Ghana, under “an action-oriented, transformational leader”. The NPP believes the National Democratic Congress has failed and must be changed for hope and confidence to be restored in order to move Ghana forward.
Prof Akosa, the wannabe CPP presidential candidate, who was thrashed by Paa Kwesi Nduom in the 2007 CPP presidential primary, has told us recently that Kotoka’s name on our capital’s international airport is an affront to “democratic Ghana”. It should be removed. Kotoka is, of course, the name of the colonel who led the 1966 coup that toppled Kwame Nkrumah’s government and the First Republic. Akosa’s statement implies, at least to me, that Nkrumah’s Ghana was “democratic.” For those who lived through Nkrumah’s era, this statement is nothing short of astonishing. It is the rewriting of history on a big scale. It should not be allowed. By the time of his overthrow, Ghana had become a one-party state in which the colours of the one party – the Convention People’s Party (CPP) – had become the nation’s colours, replacing the national colours. The creation of the one-party state had been effected through one of the first, if not the first, of the 90% plus “referenda” that came to characterise the results of “referenda” in post-colonial Africa.
What Does the Reshuffle Mean for Developing Countries?
As the dust starts to settle on David Cameron's reshuffle Justine Greening will be starting to make Andrew Mitchell's old office at the Department for International Development (DFID) her own. She may be disappointed at losing her Transport brief, but those of us in the international development community are hopeful that she will soon see all the opportunities available in her new post. In particular, she has the chance to build on the UK's leadership on aid and to go down in the history books as a real leader on one of the big challenges of our time - that of fixing a situation where one in seven people are going to bed hungry despite there being enough food in the world for everyone.
Collateralization Of Ghana’s Future Oil Revenues:- Is This A Convenient Step Towards The ‘Curse’ Of Oil?
Ghana is close to first oil and even before it drops, indications are that the country may be heading towards ‘oil curse’. Parliament is considering the Petroleum Revenue Management Bill which in clause 5 provides for the prohibition of using its petroleum accounts and oil reserves as collateral for loans. However, government has proposed an amendment to the clause to allow it to collateralize 70% of benchmark oil revenues that are earmarked for budget support. This proposal coming from the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning which laid the original bill confirms the lack of a clear policy on oil-backed loans and indication that due diligence has not been conducted on the possible options for managing oil revenues.
The Government of Ghana announced in its 2010 Budget and Policy Statement the plan to develop an Oil and Gas Industrialization Plan as a sustainable model of managing her petroleum resources. The oil and gas driven industrialization is expected to make Ghana’s oil a blessing. For this reason, the government plans to use oil and gas resources to boost the manufacturing and agricultural sectors, through economic diversification, create jobs and promote private sector development.The country’s current economic performance is mixed and characterised by low investments. The Global Competitiveness Report of 2008/9 ranked Ghana 102 out of 134 in global competitiveness, 127th in low productivity with poor infrastructure and human capital. This makesthe proposed Industrialization Plan more imperative.
G20: Bonus for the poor?
All the focus at the G20’s meeting in Pittsburgh this week will be on bankers’ bonuses. But there are other credit-crunch issues that affect millions of people, rather than hundreds, and which are not getting the attention they deserve--like removing trade barriers against the world’s poorest countries. The G20 has talked big on trade but achieved little. At the G20 London Summit in April this year leaders pledged to “do whatever is necessary to (…) promote global trade and investment and reject protectionism, to underpin prosperity.” Since then nothing has happened, except worrying signs of increased protectionism.