The chairman of the National Peace Council, Most Rev. Prof. Emmanuel Asante, has expressed worry over what he described as “entrenched positions” taken by some political parties on how to hold successful elections.

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This report provides institutional assessment of the Electoral Commission of Ghana (hereinafter EC). The assessment was conducted in the period of July-August 2015 under the UNDP-funded project “Conduct of an Institutional Assessment and the Development a Strategic Plan for the Electoral Commission of Ghana”.

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Last week, the NPP led a brave charge for a new register at a public forum which I maintain was arranged to reject that very proposition. Leading the vociferous charge against disturbing the current register was the ruling National Democratic Congress, supported by parties, most of whom exist only on paper, but have reserved seats at the IPAC table.

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Friday, October 30, 2015, is the opportunity for parties, organisations and journalists at the two-day public forum on the voters’ register to ask the Electoral Commission questions and hopefully get answers that can help decide whether Ghana will have a new register or not.

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The Mind of Empire: China’s History and Modern Foreign Relations
With an economy and population that dwarf most industrialized nations, China is emerging as a twenty-first-century global superpower. Even though China is an international leader in modern business and technology, its ancient history exerts a powerful force on its foreign policy. In The Mind of Empire: China’s History and Modern Foreign Relations, Christopher A. Ford expertly traces China’s self-image and its role in the world order from the age of Confucius to today. Ford argues that despite its exposure to and experience of the modern world, China is still strongly influenced by a hierarchical view of political order and is only comfortable with foreign relationships that reinforce its self-perception of political and moral supremacy. Recounting how this attitude has clashed with the Western notion of separate and coequal state sovereignty, Ford speculates–and offers a warning–about how China’s legacy will continue to shape its foreign relations. more >>>
Democracy and Africa’s Search for Development
The clamor for democracy all over the globe is not accidental. Those who go about such business of agitating for democratization are convinced that no society truly desirous of development can ignore democracy. The democratic experiences of the developed countries of the world lend credence to the truth of this claim. However, the reverse seems to be the case in many of the third world countries where there has been a huge golf between the anticipated gains of democracy and the reality on ground. Click here for full report
In the aftermath of the 2008 presidential elections, no question haunted NPP leaders and supporters more than why and how Nana Addo Dankwa Akuffo Addo, the party’s presidential candidate, lost the elections to John Atta Mills, the then NDC candidate, who had been written off by most political analysts. Did the NPP primary season inflict irreparable harm on Akuffo Addo? Did President Kuffuor do enough for the campaign? Did the campaign team spend too much time on big rallies, which attracted curious people, instead of building grassroots organization? Did the campaign team waste valuable time in areas that the candidate had no chance of winning? Was the campaign too slow in responding to allegations by the NDC? Did NDC steal the verdict again? In “Chasing the Elephant into the Bush,” Dr. Arthur Kobina Kennedy attempts to address some of these questions.
Press Release: UK Expert To Lecture Ghana On Money-Laundering
The Danquah Institute has invited the world renowned international criminal law expert, John Hardy QC, to deliver two lectures on international corruption and money laundering next week.The first lecture, which is targeting players in the financial sector, legislatures, policy makers, and anti-corruption crusaders, among others, is on money laundering and takes place at the British Council on Tuesday, March 9, at 9.30am.
The promise to teachers, and soon to nurses, doctors and other civil servants of seeing a substantial increment in their take-home pay as promised by the Mills-Mahama led NDC administration seems to be little more than a pipedream. The Independence Day promise that ‘this Government will not shortchange teachers’ could be described as just another in the litany of broken promises. Documents and analysis made available to the New Statesman reveal that there is no extra money for the implementation of the Single Spine Salary Structure. In fact, the money made available to extend the SSSS to both education and health workers this year is nearly GH¢2 billion short. Thus to pretend to implement it and offer promises of allowances to keep aggrieved workers calm will only amount to shortchanging them.
London (UK) – 23 April 2011 – The Times - Beneath a dilapidated shack Frank Ofori leaps casually into the entrance of a crumbling mineshaft that plunges 200ft into the earth. With a torch strapped to his head and three sticks of dynamite in his back pocket he begins a ten-hour shift underground in the Kenyase mine camp, 200 miles (320km) north of Accra, where thousands of prospectors risk their lives in the hope of finding gold.
World Bank Report: The Africa Competitiveness Report 2013
The Africa Competitiveness Report 2013 comes out at a time of growing international attention focused on Africa as an investment destination and mounting talk of an African economic renaissance. This increased optimism is being spurred on by a decade of historically strong growth, with many countries in Africa relatively unscathed by the global economic crisis, thanks to prudent macroeconomic management. Click here for full report
DI: Use Wulensi by-election as pilot exercise  for biometric register and verification
The Danquah Institute has learnt with some regret the news that the Electoral Commission intends to use the old 2008 voters' register for the upcoming July 31 Wulensi by-election. We write to encourage the EC to have a rethink and proactively take the opportunity that this unexpected by-election represents to use Wulensi as a pilot test for the new technology of using a biometric voters' list and biometric verification system for our general elections.
Danquah Institute To Chief Justice:  Televise NPP'S Historic Legal Case
Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, the Executive Director of research, policy and governance think tank, Danquah Institute, today appealed to Chief Justice, Georgina Theodora Wood, who presides on all cases before the Supreme Court, to allow television cameras to broadcast all proceedings of the upcoming law suit by the New Patriotic Party, which intends to prove that a manipulation of the actual election results by the Electoral Commission resulted in a faulty declaration of John Drahmani Mahama as the winner of the 2012 presidential election. He said, a live televised broadcast of such a historical case for our democracy, with its far-reaching implications for this and future elections, would reduce opportunities for some people to put a self-serving spin on the proceedings and decision of the court, with the intention of inciting undue negative reactions from an already divided nation.
The system called biometric
Before I walked into the conference room of The Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) that afternoon, I knew very little about the biometric system and its implications for Ghana’s 2012 elections. And though I learnt a lot that day, I am still not one of the self-proclaimed experts of the biometric voter registration system who shout themselves coarse everyday on our airwaves.