No society has been able to sustainably develop its human and physical resources to affect the most of its people without a strong values system. The competition of Ideas they say are the vehicles of transformation but even that requires values to guide it. The Danquah Institute recognizes that a society without values is one in retrogression.  The Institute therefore places high premium on the interactions and exposures that help to build confident and patriotic citizens with integrity.

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 There are growing concerns over the quality of politics in Ghana. Why people choose to support particular political parties. What motivates allegiances and how all that can affect the nature of our democracy and the general good that society benefits from it.

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Credible information available to the New Statesman indicates that the Electoral Commission has prepared a budget of $230 million for a possible compilation of a new biometric voters register for the 2016 general elections.

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There is little time for Mr Mahama and the NDC to turn the economy around before the December 2016 presidential and legislative elections.

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2012 NPP Manifesto: Transforming lives, Transforming Ghana
This year’s election is a historic moment for Ghana. Ghanaians have a simple choice to make in either moving forward with the NPP or staying with the failed policies and personalities of the NDC administration that have brought them hardships and poverty. We, in the NPP have been in the forefront of Ghana’s development and transformation agenda. Our record of achievement during our time in government points to the fact that we know how to bring prosperity to Ghana and also make our motto of development in freedom a reality for all. Click here for full document of NPP 2012 Manifesto
(PANA)-- African foreign ministers meeting on Thursday, January 27,eugene came under pressure from foreign partners on the need to correct the continent’s electoral flaws that have precipitated the kind of post-election crisis in Cote d’Ivoire. Denmark’s Foreign Minister Lene Espersen told the opening session of the AU’s Executive Council meeting that despite overall progress in the field of democratisation, the challenge of organising free and fair elections and lack of proper state institutions constituted a worrying trend in Africa.‘It is unfortunate that recently, we have seen a number of challenges to electoral processes and institutions, latest in Cote d’Ivoire,’ she said.
It would be correct to say that a number of the policies and actions of democratic governments in the world often run counter to the wishes and desires of a great majority of the people in the nation. This is because those policies and actions are adopted by the government and some lawmakers that comprise a relatively few people, thus exclusive of the inputs, preferences, and wishes of a large majority of the people. It is not enough, surely, for the people to be included—and to participate--only in the periodic election of those who are to govern and to make laws for the state. The consequences of the exclusion of large segments of the population from the decisions of the government that affect the lives of the people have been public demonstrations to protest government policy and action and to indicate the preferences of the people. Political conflict, violence, rancor, and misunderstanding have also resulted from the exclusion of the people from decisions and choices of their government.
Dr J B Danquah, Ghana's President we never had (Part 1)
The image and memorabilia of some very prominent patriots who have spent the whole of their time struggling for the ideals of good governance and self-government have been pushed under the carpets of some so-called new era politicians. As to who did what in the past, bringing about the present that they have come to inherit, that will lead us into the future is not their concern.
Rev. Degbe: 2012 elections will be more credible, peaceful
Rev. Dr. Fred Deegbe, the General Secretary of the Christian Council of Ghana, believes that while the electoral process is still beset by problems, the upcoming polls will likely be more credible and peaceful than previous ones. Part of the reason that he is confident is because the police and other security personnel have been well equipped not only with weapons but with communications gadgets to call for backup when necessary.
Al-Qaida’s Appeal:  Understanding its Unique Selling Points
Despite its seemingly extreme ideology and its even more extreme use of political violence, al-Qaida has been able to elicit sympathy and support from a surprisingly large number of people. Suspected al-Qaida members have been arrested in dozens of countries around the world, and opinion polls in both Western and Middle Eastern countries have shown that relatively large numbers of young Muslims express sympathy with al-Qaida. In other words, we have a situation in which al-Qaida has killed civilians on a massive scale, including a large number of Muslims, but still seems to enjoy relatively widespread support. How can we explain this apparent conundrum? This article argues that al-Qaida's continuing appeal is a result of three key factors. First, al-Qaida propagates a simple popular message, which resonates strongly with deeply held grievances in the Muslim world. The organisation strives to follow the popular mood in many respects. Second, al-Qaida has created for itself a powerful and captivating image.
The closest of shaves
Prime Minister Raila Odinga is challenging Uhuru Kenyatta’s narrow win in court after a spate of technical failures at the electoral commission Uhuru Kenyatta’s presidential victory leaves Kenya still a divided nation. He achieved it by engineering a partnership between his fellow Kikuyu and the Kalenjin of his running mate, William Ruto, in the Jubilee Alliance. Locally, the big losers are the rival candidates, Raila Odinga and Stephen Kalonzo Musyoka. Those Western countries which opposed the candidacies of Kenyatta and Ruto now face the problems of dealing with a President and Deputy who are charged with crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Court (ICC).
S&P affirms ratings on Republic of Ghana at 'B/B'
The Republic of Ghana benefits from strong GDP growth, strengthening oil production volumes, and a track record of political stability. However, it continues to suffer from weak fiscal management highlighted by a widening of the fiscal deficit in 2010 and increased supplier arrears. We are therefore affirming our 'B/B' foreign- and local-currency sovereign credit ratings on the Republic of Ghana. The stable outlook balances our view of the country's strong growth prospects and track record of political stability against its weak payment culture and fiscal challenges.
Ghana’s inflation rate rose in February for the second consecutive month as a 30 percent jump in gasoline costs at the beginning of the year pushed up transportation fees. Inflation accelerated to 9.2 percent from 9.1 percent in January, Grace Bediako, head of the Ghana Statistical Service, told reporters today in the capital, Accra. “With most of the upward pressure on inflation arising from the 30 percent fuel-price increase in the new year, February inflation should still be up,” Razia Khan, head of Africa research at Standard Chartered Bank Plc in London, said in an e-mailed note yesterday.
2012 is not a contest of broken promises but performance
Since Nana Akufo-Addo accused President Mills and his government of creating a poverty-owning democracy and limping from one broken promise to the other, the preferred response of the ruling party is to engage forest of trees photocopying the 2000 manifesto of the New Patriotic Party to make the belated point that the NPP also broke promises in their first term. It is as if election 2012 will be fought on which party broke more of its promises. So low have the standards of governance fallen in Ghana today that the NDC want to make it no longer a positive contest of records of performance but rather a negative contest on broken promises.