Credible information available to the New Statesman indicates that the Electoral Commission has prepared a budget of $230 million for a possible compilation of a new biometric voters register for the 2016 general elections.

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There is little time for Mr Mahama and the NDC to turn the economy around before the December 2016 presidential and legislative elections.

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 There are growing concerns over the quality of politics in Ghana. Why people choose to support particular political parties. What motivates allegiances and how all that can affect the nature of our democracy and the general good that society benefits from it.

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The chairman of the National Peace Council, Most Rev. Prof. Emmanuel Asante, has expressed worry over what he described as “entrenched positions” taken by some political parties on how to hold successful elections.

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Other Stories

Ghana's total debt hits $12.91 billion and going
Ghana’s total debt has doubled in just two years under President JEA Mills. Documents made available to the New Statesman from policy think tank, Danquah Institute, indicate that Ghana’s total is $12.9 billion currently. At the end of 2008, when the New Patriotic Party left office, Ghana’s domestic debt stood at GH¢4.8 billion (or $3.170bn in today’s exchange rate). At the end of 2010, under the National Democratic Congress, this had shot up to Ghc8.28bn ($5.47bn).
Monetary Policy Committee Statement: February 2012
The Committee has assessed developments in the economy for 2011 and I am happy to present highlights of recent economic developments and their implications for macroeconomic stability and growth, leading to the positioning of the Monetary PolicyRate. Recent policy discussions have centred on the Euro zone crisis and the challenges it poses for global economic recovery, a crisis that has pushed the global economy into a difficult phase of significant downside risks. Click here for full report
Business Re-Engineering In A Global Recession
The causes of the late 2007 Global financial crisis which degenerated into a full blown recession by mid 2008 have been argued and discussed extensively. Whatever the causes, it is a fact that by the middle of 2008, the world economy was engulfed in a severe crisis of confidence. The classic signs of a recession were evident as stock markets crashed. Growth rates plummetted in all major economies and unemployment soared. Companies collapsed and financial markets were in turmoil. As two successive quarters of negative growth in GDP occurred in economy after economy, the academic definition for a recession was fulfilled. The IMF definition of annual growth of less than 3% was also fulfilled by the end of 2008.
Press Statement: Towards a stronger Statistical Service
Earlier today, the Ghana Statistical Service organised a press conference to assert that the Service is credible, and that their principles and methods for gathering and processing data have not changed. This defensiveness is unnecessary. The Ghana Statistical Service, as a state institution, needs to receive feedback on its work and use such feedback to improve its performance and output. The GSS must not assume that any criticism of its work is an attack on its credibility. Read more>>>
Mike Ocquaye calls for bi-partisan inquiry into Vikileaks
Former Member of Parliament for Dome Kwabenya constituency, Prof Mike Ocquaye, has called for a Parliamentary nquiry into comments made by sacked Deputy Communication Minister, Victoria Hammah, on a leaked tape. Prof Ocquaye who is also a former Second Deputy Speaker of Parliament said Parliament is mandated to enquire into allegations of corruption such as those made by Victoria Hammah. Miss Hammah said on the leaked tape that has gone viral since last week that the Minister of Gender, Women and Social Protection played a key role in the August 25 ruling of the Supreme Court Judges on the 2012 Election Petition.
Pass the Books. Hold the Oil.
EVERY so often someone asks me: “What’s your favorite country, other than your own?” I’ve always had the same answer: Taiwan. “Taiwan? Why Taiwan?” people ask. Very simple: Because Taiwan is a barren rock in a typhoon-laden sea with no natural resources to live off of — it even has to import sand and gravel from China for construction — yet it has the fourth-largest financial reserves in the world.
The Wuaku Commission report, submitted in November 2002, stated: “Having considered the totality of evidence before the Commission, we have come to the conclusion that the events that took place in Yendi on 25th, 26th, and 27th March, 2002, were criminal acts of an act of war fought between two Gates for which individuals from both Gates are blameable.”It further found that “the illegal stockpiling of arms and ammunitions by both Abudu and Andani royal families and sympathisers made it easier for them to resort to violence.” History tells us that in the 14th century Na Gbewaa established the ancient Kingdom of Greater Dagbon with Pusiga as the capital. His death resulted in a power struggle which saw one of his sons, Zirli murdering his brother, Kufogu in order to assume the skin. That historical account informs us that the killing of Prince Kufogu led to a full-blown war, which ended in the break-up of the Greater Dagbon Kingdom.
Invitation from Danquah Institute - Public Lecture on International Corruption
The Danquah Institute has invited the world renowned international criminal law expert, John Hardy QC, to deliver two lectures on international corruption and money laundering next week. We are extending an invitation to you to attend these lectures which we consider as important to our national development efforts. The theme of the first lecture is: “PROTECTING GHANA AND GHANA’S EMERGING FINANCIAL OFFSHORE CENTRE STATUS FROM MONEY LAUNDERING”. Venue: BRITISH COUNCIL on TUESDAY, MARCH 9, at 9.30AM. more >>>
In the last five months alone, President J E A Mills has made two 3-day official trips to Equatorial Guinea and has on both occasions returned to Ghana with news of striking significantly different crude oil deals with his Equatorial Guinean counterpart, President Theodore Nguema Mbasogo. The Danquah Institute is also extremely disturbed by moves by the Government of Ghana to rescue a Korean company that is US$6.3 billion in debt, whilst thousands of Ghanaian companies are also in distress and would require only a fraction of that amount to stimulate them back into productivity and profitability. more >>>
DI wants $3bn ‘illegal’ CDB loan cancelled and cured
The Danquah Institute has described the $3 billion China Development Bank loan contracted by the Mills-Mahama led National Democratic Congress government as an illegality as it breaches sections of the Petroleum Revenue Management Act passed by parliament this year. DI is therefore calling for the cancellation and subsequent curing of this loan facility and has urged the parties to the contract to take note of this and proceed to cure it or proceed to their own detriment.