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In recent months, political parties in Ghana including the New Patriotic Party (NPP), the Convention People’s Party (CPP), the Progressive People’s Party, religious groups, the media and civil society groups such as the Let My Vote Count Alliance have made the case for urgent and honest electoral reform in the lead up to the November 2016 elections.

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In recent months, political parties including the New Patriotic Party (NPP) and the Convention People’s Party (CPP) and civil society groups such as the Let My Vote Count Alliance have made the case for urgent electoral reform in the lead up to the November 2016 elections.

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Pro –opposition Think Tank, the Danquah Institute says the Electoral Commission (EC’s) decision to use de-duplication processes to rid the voters register of multiple registration will do very little to make the current voters register credible.

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We invited the media today for this news conference because we find it strange and potentialy dangerous that the most reasonable solution that was tabled by the VCRAC Crabbe panel for giving Ghana a credible register for credible elections in 2016 appears to have been totally ignored by the Electoral Commission. We, therefore, want to draw attention to this and ask you, journalists, the Fourth Estate of the Realm, to demand urgent answers from the Electoral Commission on the fate of the wise proposal from the EC’s own panel of experts for the introduction of validation for the voters’ register. Full Publication

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Other Stories

Drug Trafficking: Has it really been reduced?
The Danquah Institute has questioned the validity of the claims from the Presidency that the incidence of drug trafficking in the country has been reduced. Even though President Mills during his campaign pledged to vigorously fight the menace, the reported shortage of drugs by the Narcotics Control Board (NACOB) last week can not be simply explained as the result of increased efforts by the government and security agencies.Nana Attobrah Quaicoe, Head of Research at the Danquah Institute remarked: “Governance is essentially about policies, legislations and enforcements and not mere indications or speculations; it is particularly worrying because it is difficult to point at any new policy or legislation of the new government in this regard. There is no statistics to back the claims, no coast guards nor sniffer dogs at border post and indeed we don’t even know of any increment in budgetary allocation to NACOB.”
Electoral Commission Puts The Brakes On Ghana's Democracy Project
The belief in the power of institutions as a check on individual excesses, especially in the domain of politics goes back to antiquity. This is Brutus on the occasion of the coronation of his best friend, Julius Caesar: Crown him that, and then, I grant, we put a sting in him, That at his will he may do danger with. The abuse of greatness is, when it disjoins Remorse from power; and, to speak of conscience, Caesar, compassion I have not known when his affections swayed more than his reason.It is this same belief in the power of institutions as opposed to individuals in enhancing democratic governance which led President Barack Obama to admonish the Ghanaians during his visit to the country to strive to build stronger institutions to safeguard our nascent Democracy which was at that point becoming the envy of the world.
BBC World Service Survey
The most talked about global issue in Ghana is unemployment, mentioned three times more frequently by Ghanaians than the global average (49% vs 16%). Corruption is the second most discussed issue (42%, twice as many as the global average) and is also the most serious global problem, rated as veryserious by 77 per cent of respondents. Extreme poverty (65%) and the spread of human diseases (58%) are ranked second and third respectively, and are rated comparably with the global averages (69% and 55%, respectively). Click here for further findings
Why Martin A. B. K. Amidu is not using government or party channels for his advocacy for accountability and transparency
The purpose of this statement following immediately after my opinion of 28th May 2012 stating that the President’s executive judgment in the matter of the Supreme Court decision in the case of Okudzeto Ablakwa and Omane-Boamah against the Attorney-General (Jake Obetsebi-Lampety voluntarily applied and was joined as additional Defendant) is to answer the accusations and spins on why I am not directing my criticisms in-house to the Government or the NDC. The Government spin since I left office has been that I am a disgruntled smokescreen being used by the NPP against the Government.
AN Overview of Dr Bawumia's Book on Ghana's Economy
The book inter alia undertakes an in-depth review of Ghana’s monetary policy regimes since independence: Direct Controls, Monetary Targeting, and Inflation Targeting under different governments (including Nkrumah, NLC, Busia, Acheampong, Rawlings, Kufuor). Financial sector development and reforms that have taken place alongside the monetary policy regimes are also placed under the microscope. These include regulatory and legal reforms, capital market and money market reforms, banking reforms, currency redenomination, reforms, payment system reform, rural banking reforms, and Ghana’s debut sovereign bond issue. Why were these monetary policy regimes and financial sector reforms adopted? What role did the political economy play in the reforms and outcomes? What was the impact of the different monetary regimes and financial sector reforms on the performance of Ghana’s economy? more >>>
The Supreme Court judgment of 29 August 2013 on the Presidential Election Petition raises both legal and jurisprudential questions that the nation has to confront for years to come. It is doubtful if the majority position of dismissing the petition ever took into consideration the wider implications for the promotion and the sustenance of the rule of law, constitutional development, the advancement of democratic aspirations of the country, and the wider national interest.This commentary seeks to address those issues and argue that, the majority in the case failed to appreciate the wider national interest that the case sought to advance.
US-Ghana relations in the past
Ghana has enjoyed a strong relationship with U.S. ever since the first American Peace Corps volunteers came to Ghana in 1961, the same year that President John F. Kennedy created the U.S. Agency for International Development (U.S.AID) to assist the developing world (aside from a blip in the mid-1980s during the Soussoudis spy affair). Indeed, the setting up of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of African Affairs in 1958 was largely informed by Ghana becoming the first black African nation to gain independence the previous year.
The Danquah Institute, a policy think tank, has cautioned against plans of the government to return to the discredited old policy of selecting, by discretion, 30% of first year Senior High School students from catchment areas. While welcoming the policy to ensure that the local people are given a special allocation to schools in their areas, DI disagrees with the discretionary manner the Government intends to have the policy implemented. In his State of the Nation address to Parliament, President JEA Mills said, “We have noted that the rate at which the computerized placement mechanism is blocking access to second cycle education by pupils from basic schools in the catchment area.”
GHANA BEYOND THE SUPREME COURT
What will happen when the Supreme Court rules in the election dispute? Will there be peace or violence? That we were a divided country before December 7th is clear to all—after all, this is the second election in a row that the winner has failed to win 51% of the votes. Unfortunately, the court case following the election has only worsened the divisions and tensions. Of course, it can be argued that if the petitioners had chosen the streets instead of the courts, our plight would be worse. This case, regardless of the outcome, has already undermined quite a few reputations and national assumptions:
If we educate our people and the oil run out we would’ve saved our nation – Nana Addo
The Presidential Candidate of the opposition New Patriotic Party, Nana Akufo-Addo has mounted arguably the most robust defence yet of his free senior high school promise. Answering a question on how to use the country’s oil resources for the benefit of the people, Nana Akufo-Addo said his commitment to the free SHS policy was not about winning the December elections but about preparing the country’s next generation.