No society has been able to sustainably develop its human and physical resources to affect the most of its people without a strong values system. The competition of Ideas they say are the vehicles of transformation but even that requires values to guide it. The Danquah Institute recognizes that a society without values is one in retrogression.  The Institute therefore places high premium on the interactions and exposures that help to build confident and patriotic citizens with integrity.

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 There are growing concerns over the quality of politics in Ghana. Why people choose to support particular political parties. What motivates allegiances and how all that can affect the nature of our democracy and the general good that society benefits from it.

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Credible information available to the New Statesman indicates that the Electoral Commission has prepared a budget of $230 million for a possible compilation of a new biometric voters register for the 2016 general elections.

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There is little time for Mr Mahama and the NDC to turn the economy around before the December 2016 presidential and legislative elections.

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Ruling: Samuel Okudzeto Ablakwah, Dr Edward Omane Boamah vrs The Attorney General and Jake Obetsebi Lamptey
The plaintiffs as per their writ claim as follows:1. A declaration that, by virtue of Articles 20(5), 20(6), 23, 257, 258, 265, 284 and 296 of the Constitution of the Republic of Ghana, 1992, the Minister of Water Resources, Works and Housing in the previous Government of His Excellency, President J.A. Kufuor, did not have the power to direct the sale, disposal of transfer of any Government or public land to the 2nd Defendant or any other person or body under any circumstances whatsoever, and that any such direction for disposal, sale or outright transfer of the said property in dispute or any public land to the 2nd Defendant was unconstitutional and illegal. Click here for Justice Atugubah's ruling Click here for Justice Brobbey's ruling Click here for Justice Dotse's ruling
Africa’s tax systems: progress, but what is the next generation of reforms?
Taxation is zipping up the development agenda, but the discussion is often focussed on international aspects such as tax havens or the Robin Hood Tax. Both very important, but arguably, even more important is what happens domestically – are developing country tax systems regressive or progressive? Are they raising enough cash to fund state services? Are they efficient and free of corruption? This absolutely magisterial overview of the state of tax systems in Africa comes from Mick Moore (right), who runs the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD). It was first published by the Africa Research Institute. Anglophone countries have led the way in reforming tax administration in Africa, considerably more so than their francophone peers. The reasons for this are numerous. Networks of international tax specialists are based mainly in English-speaking countries. Many of the modern systems that promote best practice within tax authorities were developed in anglophone countries, especially Australia. International donors, and particularly the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), have directly and indirectly promoted a lot of reform of national tax authorities. In fact, this has been one of the success stories of British aid.
Report of the Constitution Review Commission
The Constitution Review Commission, a presidential Commission of Inquiry, was set up in January 2010 to consult with the people of Ghana on the operation of the 1992 Constitution and on any changes that need to be made to the Constitution. The Commission was also tasked to present a draft bill for the amendment of the Constitution in the event that any changes are warranted. Click here for full report
Press Release: Bank of Ghana’s response to allegations of illegal money transfers into Ghana
The attention of the Bank of Ghana has been drawn to reports in the media about illegal money transfer activities. The Daily Graphic of August 11, 2011 carries a story to the effect that the Bank of Ghana, the regulatory authority, did not appear to be attaching the requisite relevance and urgency to the growing threat of unregistered foreign exchange transactions to the nation’s balance of payments and finances. Another story in the Daily Guide, also of August 11, 2011 under the caption ‘Money Laundering booms’ reached a similar conclusion with advice to the Bank of Ghana to proactively promote the operations of formal transfer methods and act against illegal methods as well as consider allowing MTOs to transmit money out of Ghana as a solution to the growing menace.
The Fallacies of J.B. Danquah's Heroic Legacy - A Comment by Prof. R Addo-Fening
Allow me space to comment on the above mentioned publication which appeared in the Ghanaian Lens of Tuesday 6 June 2006. I owe it to students of Ghanaian History, Okyeman and the Ghanaian public at large not to let it pass without comment. The writer, Dr, Kwame Botwe-Asamoah, Professor of African/African American History, University of Pittsburgh, takes a swipe at President Kuffuor and Okyenhene Amoatia Ofori Panin - the former, for describing the late Dr. J.B. Danquah as "the Prime Minister Ghana never had" during the commemoration of the 40th anniversary of this death in February 2005; the latter for suggesting that the University of Ghana named after Dr. Danquah. more >>>
DI: Use Wulensi by-election as pilot exercise  for biometric register and verification
The Danquah Institute has learnt with some regret the news that the Electoral Commission intends to use the old 2008 voters' register for the upcoming July 31 Wulensi by-election. We write to encourage the EC to have a rethink and proactively take the opportunity that this unexpected by-election represents to use Wulensi as a pilot test for the new technology of using a biometric voters' list and biometric verification system for our general elections.
In the aftermath of the 2008 presidential elections, no question haunted NPP leaders and supporters more than why and how Nana Addo Dankwa Akuffo Addo, the party’s presidential candidate, lost the elections to John Atta Mills, the then NDC candidate, who had been written off by most political analysts. Did the NPP primary season inflict irreparable harm on Akuffo Addo? Did President Kuffuor do enough for the campaign? Did the campaign team spend too much time on big rallies, which attracted curious people, instead of building grassroots organization? Did the campaign team waste valuable time in areas that the candidate had no chance of winning? Was the campaign too slow in responding to allegations by the NDC? Did NDC steal the verdict again? In “Chasing the Elephant into the Bush,” Dr. Arthur Kobina Kennedy attempts to address some of these questions.
Will auditing and cleaning up give us a credible register?
Last week, the NPP led a brave charge for a new register at a public forum which I maintain was arranged to reject that very proposition. Leading the vociferous charge against disturbing the current register was the ruling National Democratic Congress, supported by parties, most of whom exist only on paper, but have reserved seats at the IPAC table.
GHANA’S TROUBLED ECONOMY Where are the remedies?
On Tuesday, March 5, 2013 the Minister of Finance came to Parliament to deliver the NDC administration’s Budget Statement and Economic Policy for the 2013 financial year. It was a hogwash of assorted patchworks and propaganda. But it was presented as a set of remedies to give the nation a breakthrough, a new beginning and to provide a bail out from the myriad of problems including the huge public debt; the lamentable fiscal deficit, the humongous arrears, unbridled overspending, worsening unemployment, deteriorating utility services, and failing social services. Somehow, government managed to hope that the 2013 budget statement and economic policy would propel real national development in the various sectors.
Radio Remains Top Choice for News Even as Traditional Media Loses Ground
Radio remains the dominant news source for most Africans; more than 60% of the people in every state except Egypt consume radio news, according to Afrobarometer's survey of 34 countries. Both television and internet are growing as sources of news, chipping at radio's dominance, but 77% of people on the continent listen to radio news at least a few times every month, the survey shows. Afrobarometer's report, "The Partnership of Freedom of Speech and Good Governance in Africa," was released today at the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Nairobi. Written by Winnie Mitullah and Paul Kamau from IDS, the report tracks media use across 34 countries in 2011-2013 (Afrobarometer Round 5), and over time in 16 countries (2002-2012).