Credible information available to the New Statesman indicates that the Electoral Commission has prepared a budget of $230 million for a possible compilation of a new biometric voters register for the 2016 general elections.

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There is little time for Mr Mahama and the NDC to turn the economy around before the December 2016 presidential and legislative elections.

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 There are growing concerns over the quality of politics in Ghana. Why people choose to support particular political parties. What motivates allegiances and how all that can affect the nature of our democracy and the general good that society benefits from it.

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The chairman of the National Peace Council, Most Rev. Prof. Emmanuel Asante, has expressed worry over what he described as “entrenched positions” taken by some political parties on how to hold successful elections.

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FACTBOX: Political risks to watch in Ghana
The start of commercial oil production in 2010 has helped promote Ghana into the ranks of the world's lower middle-income nations, fuelling hopes of ending a dependence on aid and forging a future as one of Africa's star economies. While President John Atta Mills's government is seen to have done well in knocking public finances into shape since 2008, elections are due in December and the country's deficit is being strained by a high wage and fuel subsidy bill. The Bank of Ghana is tightening monetary policy to fend off mounting inflation pressures and stabilise the sliding cedi currency.
NDC can't buy conscience of Ghanaians - Kufuor
Former President J.A. Kufuor has accused the National Democratic Congress (NDC) of resorting to vote buying ahead of the December 7 elections and warned the party that the conscience of the Ghanaian people is not for sale. Speaking to a large number of New Patriotic Party (NPP) supporters and leading members who had braved hours of heavy downpour in Kumasi to attend a rally, Mr. Kufuor said that Ghanaians are wide awake and discerning and that they will vote the NDC out, especially because the vote buying money came from the state.
As far as I know, no constitution, in the world, recognizes or even acknowledges the importance of the concession by the losing presidential candidate in a presidential election. Nevertheless, this concession has become a ritual that all the advanced democracies acknowledge and recognize as an important element of their electoral activities. It is that singular action that signifies the successful resolution of the election and avoids the involvement of the judicial branch, in what should properly belong to the political space. Occasionally, however, there is a dispute about the election results and the concession is not forthcoming. In this situation, the optimal solution is to have the courts resolve the dispute prior to inaugurating the President. This is because most countries realize the irreparable harm inherent in inaugurating a President, who may not have been validly elected. Such harm includes, but is not limited to, the cloud that hangs around the Presidency, which might deter international stakeholders from dealing with the President, or dealing with him under significant uncertainty. Domestically, the President’s power to appoint is likely to come into conflict with the legislature’s power to vet as a serious legislature may raise questions about the wisdom in investing vetting resources into appointments that may be short-lived. Local actors may be plunged into a wait-and-see mode and freeze their business plans, in light of the uncertainty about the direction of the country.
Technology is the solution to Illiteracy – Mr. Kofi Bentil
Mr. Kofi Bentil of IMANI Ghana has stated that the solution to illiteracy in Ghana is the introduction of technology into all spheres of the Ghanaian life.He made this statement at a conference being organised by the Danquah Institute on biometric voter registration and electronic voting in Ghana. The first day of the two days conference was devoted to interrogating the advantages and challenges of introducing biometric voter registration and the second day devoted to e-voting in Ghana.
The Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning has been tasked to lead the preparation of the Ghana’s oil revenue and management law. A preliminary version of the proposals was posted online to solicit inputs. This latest version of the proposal has benefitted immensely from the public feedback. This version also reflects the results of the nation-wide public consultations held and survey questionnaire administered between February 24 and March 21, 2010, and it is made available again for your comments before submission to Cabinet. more >>>
Subsidiary Agreement - Gas Infrastructure Project
The Government of the People's Republic of China and the Government of the Republic of Ghana are resolved to expand bilateral relations through harmonious, sustainable and win-win economic co-operation measures, in line with the principles adopted for the Forum on China-Africa Co-operation. The Lender seeks to apply its financial support as a means to enhance bilateral economic and trade relations between China and Ghana by extending commercial loans to the Borrower, to be applied by the Borrower on the terms and conditions set out in this Agreement. Click here for subsidiary agreement
The Supreme Court judgment of 29 August 2013 on the Presidential Election Petition raises both legal and jurisprudential questions that the nation has to confront for years to come. It is doubtful if the majority position of dismissing the petition ever took into consideration the wider implications for the promotion and the sustenance of the rule of law, constitutional development, the advancement of democratic aspirations of the country, and the wider national interest.This commentary seeks to address those issues and argue that, the majority in the case failed to appreciate the wider national interest that the case sought to advance.
33% Ghanaians to vote based on employment
A survey conducted by the National Commission for Civic Education (NCCE) has revealed that 33 percent of Ghanaians say employment creation is the third most important issue they will consider before they vote. At a ceremony to outline the findings to the media, Mrs. Gertrude Zakaria-Ali Director of Reasearch at the NCCE said the research conducted in March this year, was to ascertain the issues of importance to voters in the run up to the December polls.
GREDA: STOP $10BN STX HOUSING DEAL, WE CAN DO IT CHEAPER
The Ghana Real Estate Developers Association, GREDA has joined calls for parliament to reject the government’s agreement with a Korean company, STX for the construction of 200,000 housing units at the cost of $10 billion because it does not represent value for money and not in the nation's interest. GREDA says although the plan to reduce the housing deficit through the project is commendable, local contractors can execute the project at less than half the cost quoted by the Korean firm if given the same incentives and exemptions government is keen on granting STX.
Dzi Wo Fie Asem: Rhetoric and the Politics of Expediency
On 7th January 2011, His Excellency the President, in a face to face encounter with the media, used a proverb that has now become a household expression: Dzi wo fie asem. The incident could be considered as only a trigger for this evening’s talk, which centers on the character of political rhetoric within Ghana’s contemporary history. There appears to be a growing sensitivity to political communication in this country: specifically the norms of communication, or standards of propriety in speech comportment. There is a collective realization that the spoken word may have done a lot to shape our political fortunes. Throughout our contemporary history, the spoken word has been so important in our political life, that not only is free speech enshrined in the constitution; care has also been taken to integrate speaking regulations within governance forums, from parliamentary discourse, through discourse in the law courts, to executive discourse at cabinet meetings, and to presidential discourses of engagement