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We study election fraud in a competitive but not fully consolidated multiparty democracy. Results from a randomized field experiment are used to investigate the effectiveness of newly-introduced biometric identification machines in reducing election fraud in Ghana’s December 2012 national elections. We uncover a non-random pattern to the frequent breakdowns of the equipment. In polling stations with a randomly assigned domestic election observer, machines were about 50 percent less likely to experience breakdown as they were in polling stations without observers. We also find that electoral competition in the parliamentary race is strongly associated with greater machine breakdown. Machine malfunction in turn facilitated election fraud, including overvoting, registry rigging, and ballot stuffing, especially where election observers were not present. Our results substantiate that partisan competition may promote election fraud in a newly-established competitive democracy. They also show that domestic election observers improve election integrity through direct observation and also thanks to their second-order effects on election administration. Full Publication

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Credible information available to the New Statesman indicates that the Electoral Commission has prepared a budget of $230 million for a possible compilation of a new biometric voters register for the 2016 general elections.

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No society has been able to sustainably develop its human and physical resources to affect the most of its people without a strong values system. The competition of Ideas they say are the vehicles of transformation but even that requires values to guide it. The Danquah Institute recognizes that a society without values is one in retrogression.  The Institute therefore places high premium on the interactions and exposures that help to build confident and patriotic citizens with integrity.

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 There are growing concerns over the quality of politics in Ghana. Why people choose to support particular political parties. What motivates allegiances and how all that can affect the nature of our democracy and the general good that society benefits from it.

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Other Stories

Ghana Jubilee oilfield partners buy FPSO vessel: GNPC
Partners in Ghana's Jubilee offshore oilfield, operated by Tullow Oil, have bought a Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel from Tokyo-listed Modec, Ghana's state oil company GNPC said on Friday. Sources close to the deal said it valued the "Kwame Nkrumah" vessel, which was leased to the Jubilee partners for its first year of operation, at $750 million.
REPORT ON THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION PETITION IN GHANA – 23 February 2013 (updated 18 March)
The international community, generally, endorsed Ghana’s 2012 elections as “free and fair.” Ghana, the continent’s star of democracy, had done it once again for Africa. John Mahama, the declared winner, was duly sworn in without any violent protests on January 7, 2013. But, the country’s biggest opposition party filed a petition in Ghana’s supreme court, (the first of its kind in the country’s history), challenging the presidential results. It is noteworthy that since the first election of Ghana’s Fourth Republic in 1992, 2012 was the only other time that a majority of the political parties (5 out of 7) that participated in the contest had come out to raise major concerns about the conduct of the polls. Indeed, the second runner-up and leader of the Progressive People’s Party, Dr Papa Kwesi Nduom, is on record as saying, "I have been involved in elections since 1992 and this is the worst in terms of credibility." See link: http://www.theafricareport.com/News-Analysis/ghana-election-results-another-party-backs-npp-fraud-claims.html
Ace Ankomah explains to all ye lay men why Woyome-gate stinks
There are a lot of things flying all around and above us about a man whose name has over the past few months become a noun, a verb, an adjective and any other literary device you may want to attribute it to. I had frankly never heard the name Woyome until the Chronicle blew the lid over some gargantuan amount (with all due respect and the succinct permission of a certain Martin Amidu) to the whole nation. All kinds of people, most of whom have absolutely no background in law nor finance to investigate or the journalism skill to piece together all of the numbers and laws for us all to understand, have been on air, on TV, on social media all seeking to exonerate government or make government look like a bunch of criminals out to dupe Ghana.
Mills must grab ethics with long hand of law
As a Cabinet Minister for seven years and the presidential candidate for the ruling party in 2008, Nana Akufo-Addo served the nation with ad admirable level of over-and-above self-imposed ethical principles. These included, not applying for state lands and even refusing to draw on his allocation of fuel, to which every Minister (and others) was entitled. In fact, the story is told of him getting very furious to come back from a trip abroad on an official duty only to find out that his driver had gone to the Castle to claim fuel on his account.However, rather than praising it as exemplifying the kind of leadership that Ghana needs, this has been subjected to charges of “hypocrisy”, “holier-than-thou”, “shopping your colleagues”, etc., against him. He has been put on the defensive for being extra-ethical! Leading this charge have been two the Spokesperson for Vice President John Mahama, John Abu Jinapor. Also notable are pro-Mills newspapers such as, the Insight and Enquirer.
Biometric Voter Registration - Road Map
ELECTORAL COMMISSION, ROAD MAP FOR BIOMETRIC VOTER REGISTRATION. Please find below listing of major activities of the biometric voter registration project segmented into quarterly timeframes, using 3rd quarter as reference point. more>>>
The significance of July’s visit
Against this backdrop, July’s U.S. state visit is significant for various reasons. It will be President Obama’s first to Africa – a continent that has not only personal significance for Obama the man, but growing political significance for Obama the President - and one that has significant expectations of the first black President to sit in the Oval Office.
IS EC PREPARED FOR NOV. 7?
By the middle of July, the nation expects its sovereign Parliament to debate and vote on the constitutional amendment intended to change the date for holding general elections in Ghana from December 7 to November 7. Since, 1992, when the presidential election was held in November, all subsequent ones were held on December 7. The bill needs both Parliamentary Majority and Minority to agree in order to become law.
On Friday, February 11, during a current affairs programme on Peace FM, a leading member of the ruling National Democratic Congress repeated the posthumous smear campaign that Joseph Boakye Danquah, the ‘doyen of Ghana’ and co-founder of Ghana’s first political party, the United Gold Coast Convention (UGCC), was a CIA spy. To support this false allegation, the NDC man stated categorically that declassified CIA files of Ghana’s First Republic name Dr Danquah, then the leader of the United Party (UP), the main opposition party to Kwame Nkrumah’s Convention People’s Party (CPP), as a CIA spy.
P/NDC supporters have one myth that they hold dear, to wit, J. A. Kuffuor packed the courts to secure the conviction of Tsatsu Tsikata. Not only is this mythical, it is equally claptrap and hooey. It is well known that Tsatsu was convicted by one judge, who incidentally was appointed by Chairman JJR long before JAK became President, Judge Henrietta Abban, who was maligned and harassed for just doing her job.
 Ghana cocoa's reputation at risk
Concerns over Ghana's management of its cocoa sector, hit by a surprise crop failure this season, have undermined its relationship with the industry and threaten its reputation as the world's premier supplier of top-quality beans, traders said.