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This report provides institutional assessment of the Electoral Commission of Ghana (hereinafter EC). The assessment was conducted in the period of July-August 2015 under the UNDP-funded project “Conduct of an Institutional Assessment and the Development a Strategic Plan for the Electoral Commission of Ghana”.

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Authorities in Guinea imposed a curfew in the city of Nzerekore overnight Monday following violent clashes between rival political groups ahead of the presidential election. Dozens were injured in fighting over the weekend and local media sources said one person was killed, according to Reuters.

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Friday, October 30, 2015, is the opportunity for parties, organisations and journalists at the two-day public forum on the voters’ register to ask the Electoral Commission questions and hopefully get answers that can help decide whether Ghana will have a new register or not.

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Progress in governance across Africa has stalled since 2011, with deteriorating safety and lack of economic opportunity overshadowing any gains made on the human rights front especially in resource-rich nations, a survey said on Monday.

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The Association of Magistrates and Judges (AMJG) has noted with grave concern, the recent press statement of the ruling National Democratic Congress which was delivered by its National Chairman, Dr. Kwabena Adjei in response to a ruling of the High Court that discharged Dr. Charles Wereko-Brobbey and Mr. Kwadwo Mpiani, the two accused persons in the Ghana @ 50 trial. It has become pertinent for us to explain how the Judiciary goes about its work in response to the very issues raised at the Press Conference organized by the NDC on 17th August, 2010.
In the highly volatile world of oil and gas contracting, the common law principle that all contracts entered into should be performed in good faith, often finds itself threatened by attempts by host governments to re-negotiate contracts, and in more severe cases, attempts at expropriation or nationalisation. The basis on which states are able to do this almost unflinchingly is the international law concept of State Sovereignty. One of the ways by which international oil companies have sought cover against such situations is by the inclusion of stabilization clauses (in whatever shape or form) in international oil agreements. How can Ghana ensure that, unlike the controversies in the mining sector, the stabilisation clauses in oil contracts strike a proper balance between investor interest and national interest?
Unemployment is world's fastest-rising fear - survey
Unemployment is the world's fastest-rising worry, a BBC World Service survey covering 11,000 people in 23 countries suggests. The annual poll, called The World Speaks, gave people a list of concerns and asked which they had discussed with friends or family in the past month. Corruption and poverty still ranked the highest, but unemployment was mentioned by 18% - six times the rate citing it in the first survey in 2009.
Letter from NPP Chairman to EC Boss
We refer you to our previous correspondence on the need to get IPAC convened and deliberating on matters regarding the forthcoming Biometric Voter Registration (BVR) exercise and other issues pertaining to the 2012 general elections. Our call for specific information and material to enable us convince ourselves that the “tender process” leading to the procurement of equipment and materials is credible has fallen on, sadly, deaf ears. Click here for full details of letter
DI's Compartive Firgures for Ghana's Fiscal Deficit &GDP
The Ghana statistical service have revised GDP using 2006 as base year instead of 1993. With 2006 as the new base year, the rebased economy has grown by 60 percent, while the provisional estimate puts per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at US$1,318.36, against the existing estimate of US$753. Here the Danquah Institute provides comparative figures to show what it means to Ghana's fiscal deficit and public debt to GDP ratio. more >>>
GIPC Energy Investor Roundtable Meeting Summary 2013-05-02: Held at Ernst & Young More London
The vision for a new GIPC Mrs Trebarh outlined the brief she has received from His Excellency the President to transform the GIPC into an effective ‘gateway’ for investment proposals and enquiries. To deliver this Mrs Trebarh detailed her vision for the new GIPC including a number of fundamental structural and resource changes that are underway, such as: A new GIPC website to act as a dedicated investor resource Increased emphasis on helping investors identify and access local companies Building stronger connection with Ghana’s academic community to identify the capacity needs of the private sector and agree how academia can support these Full Document
As far as I know, no constitution, in the world, recognizes or even acknowledges the importance of the concession by the losing presidential candidate in a presidential election. Nevertheless, this concession has become a ritual that all the advanced democracies acknowledge and recognize as an important element of their electoral activities. It is that singular action that signifies the successful resolution of the election and avoids the involvement of the judicial branch, in what should properly belong to the political space. Occasionally, however, there is a dispute about the election results and the concession is not forthcoming. In this situation, the optimal solution is to have the courts resolve the dispute prior to inaugurating the President. This is because most countries realize the irreparable harm inherent in inaugurating a President, who may not have been validly elected. Such harm includes, but is not limited to, the cloud that hangs around the Presidency, which might deter international stakeholders from dealing with the President, or dealing with him under significant uncertainty. Domestically, the President’s power to appoint is likely to come into conflict with the legislature’s power to vet as a serious legislature may raise questions about the wisdom in investing vetting resources into appointments that may be short-lived. Local actors may be plunged into a wait-and-see mode and freeze their business plans, in light of the uncertainty about the direction of the country.
"The court in the execution of its duty to protect the citizen's liberty always proceeds on the well-known principle, at any rate as acknowledged in democratic countries, of the primary necessity in the administration of the law to establish a healthy balance between the need to protect the community against crime and the need to protect individual citizens against abuse of executive power. Subject to the limits imposed on this twofold protection by the establishment and maintenance of the requisite balance, the scales are to be held evenly, at any rate in normal times, between the community, that is the State and the individual and there can be no question of 'leaning over backward,' so to speak, to favour the State at the expense of the citizen or to favour the citizen at the expense of the community. And the courts' vigilance in protecting the citizen against any encroachments on his liberty by the executive becomes meaningful and real only when pursued on the basis of this principle." Chief Justice Akufo-Addo, Ex Parte Braimah.
Book Review: The living story of the poor village boy who became the first presiding bishop
I enjoy reading biographies but I have over-enjoyed reading the autobiography of the Most Rev. Dr. Asante Antwi. His book, ‘Samuel Asante Antwi – a living story’ is 160-pages of courage, perseverance, patriotism, Christian teachings and achievements of a poor, village boy who saw the heavens as the limit and rose through the firmaments to become the First Presiding Bishop of the Methodist Church, Ghana. This autobiography can also be described as a biography of Ghana, from 1937, through the formation of the UGCC in 1947, the confidence and pride of a young, nation with an energetic leadership after Independence after 1957, the dictatorship of the 1960s, the short constitutional interludes, coups and more coups before the last push for the longest, most stable period of constitutional rule since 1957.
Government Must Explain Its Commitments To RLG’s $10 Billion ‘Hope City’ PPP Project
The Danquah Institute, like well-meaning citizens and entities in Ghana, is excited by the announcement made by the Chief Executive Officer of rlg communications, Mr Roland Agambire, that it plans to build Africa's tallest building, and ICT infrastructure to create value-adding jobs and put Ghana at the centre of the global ICT market. Even more exciting is the fact that rlg has, by this US$10 billion project, called Hope City, made a huge leap to what it announced earlier in December last year, that it was to begin by January this year the construction of a US$100 million technology park in Ghana. See http://www.ventures-africa.com/2012/12/rlg-to-build-100m-technology-centre-in-ghana/