With both the West and East now courting Nairobi, President Kenyatta must decide how to do business with allies both old and new.

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Ghana is likely to clear the first review of its $918 million programme with the International Monetary Fund and secure a fresh disbursement of funds aimed at stabilising its economy.

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The European Union has moved to check emigration from West Africa by voting to invest 1.15 billion euros in aid for West Africa through to 2020.

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President John Dramani Mahama has, in accordance with Article 70(2) of the 1992 Constitution, appointed Mrs. Charlotte Osei as Chairperson of the Electoral Commission (EC) of Ghana.

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Other Stories

The new mayor of Accra has given street and pavement hawkers up to June 15, 2009 to relocate themselves to the appropriate spaces provided for them. The Mayor has committed several information vans broadcasting in various languages to the masses throughout the metropolis on his impending intention – RID ACCRA OF FILTH. Can he achieve it? That is the big question! So far, the response from the hawkers appears to be that of obstinate stubbornness – “we won’t leave the streets unless they provide cheaper and affordable spaces for us”. He certainly is not the first Mayor to attempt the feat but I think a clean Accra can be attained.
Press Release: Gov’t loses another landmark court case; reduce fuel prices, court orders
An Accra High Court (Cocoa Affairs, Court 11) presided over by His Lordship Patrick Baayeh has handed down a heavy judgement on the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) and Tema Oil Refinery (TOR) in a case in which three plaintiffs accused the NPAand TOR of inflating fuel prices and using the money for hidden purposes. more>>
The Economic Report on Africa 2011
The economic Report on Africa 2011, a joint publication of the United Nations Economic Commission forAfrica (ECA) and the African Union Commission (AUC),was prepared under the leadership of Abdoulie Janneh,ECA's Executive Secretary, and Jean Ping, Chairpersonof AUC, with the active involvement of Maxwell Mkwezalamba, Commissioner for Economic Affairs. Thereport team benefited from the guidance and supervisionof Emmanuel Nnadozie, ECA's Director of EconomicDevelopment and NEPAD Division (EDND) and RenéKouassi N'Guettia, Director of the Economic AffairsDepartment, AUC. Lalla Ben Barka, former Deputy Executive Secretary of ECA and Jennifer Kargbo, DeputyExecutive Secretary facilitated discussion of the themeof the Report. more >>>
NGOs warn Ghana will miss MDGs
A coalition of non-governmental organisations in Ghana has expressed fears that the country might fail to attain the Education for All (EFA) target under Millenium Development Goals (MDGs). The coalition said although the country initiated the draft policy of the Complementary Basic Education (CBE) in 2006, available evidence shows that about 25 percent of school going age children was still out of school.
Full Speech by Nana Akufo-Addo at IEA Evening Encounter
Distinguished ladies and gentlemen, friends from the media, fellow Ghanaians, good evening. This event was to have taken place two weeks ago, but was postponed at my request when President Mills passed away. May he rest in perfect peace. Ghanaians should be proud that together we are building a democratic state, a Ghana being governed by the rule of law. We have just gone through a unique period in our history, dealing with the death in office of a sitting President.
Africa and the Arab Spring: A New Era of Democratic Expectations
2011 saw dramatic changes in Africa’s governance landscape. Unprecedented popular demonstrations in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya led to the overturning of a century of autocratic rule in North Africa.These protests, demanding greater political freedom, economic opportunity, and an end to systemic corruption, have resonated deeply across Africa, sparking calls for change throughout the continent. Already home to more of the world’s democratizing states than any other region, even modest reverberations from the Arab Spring on Africa’s democratic trajectory will have implications for global governance norms, stability, and development. Click here for report
The Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning has been tasked to lead the preparation of the Ghana’s oil revenue and management law. A preliminary version of the proposals was posted online to solicit inputs. This latest version of the proposal has benefitted immensely from the public feedback. This version also reflects the results of the nation-wide public consultations held and survey questionnaire administered between February 24 and March 21, 2010, and it is made available again for your comments before submission to Cabinet. more >>>
US-Ghana relations in the past
Ghana has enjoyed a strong relationship with U.S. ever since the first American Peace Corps volunteers came to Ghana in 1961, the same year that President John F. Kennedy created the U.S. Agency for International Development (U.S.AID) to assist the developing world (aside from a blip in the mid-1980s during the Soussoudis spy affair). Indeed, the setting up of the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of African Affairs in 1958 was largely informed by Ghana becoming the first black African nation to gain independence the previous year.
Ghana sits on time bomb – Capt. Koomson
A retired officer of the Ghana Armed Forces, Captain Budu Koomson, believes prevailing conditions in the country make the staging of a coup d’état imminent. This, according to him, was because “the blatant abuse of state wealth by political operatives can trigger something like this coupled with the political stalemate in the society.”
In the highly volatile world of oil and gas contracting, the common law principle that all contracts entered into should be performed in good faith, often finds itself threatened by attempts by host governments to re-negotiate contracts, and in more severe cases, attempts at expropriation or nationalisation. The basis on which states are able to do this almost unflinchingly is the international law concept of State Sovereignty. One of the ways by which international oil companies have sought cover against such situations is by the inclusion of stabilization clauses (in whatever shape or form) in international oil agreements. How can Ghana ensure that, unlike the controversies in the mining sector, the stabilisation clauses in oil contracts strike a proper balance between investor interest and national interest?