Concerns over Ghana's management of its cocoa sector, hit by a surprise crop failure this season, have undermined its relationship with the industry and threaten its reputation as the world's premier supplier of top-quality beans, traders said.

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We, members of the Electoral Reforms Committee wish to thank the almighty God for the strength, health and travelling mercies granted us throughout our various meetings, discussions and retreat sessions held outside Accra in executing our mandate as spelt out in our Terms of Reference. We thank the Chairman and Members of the Electoral Commission for giving us the opportunity to serve mother Ghana.

To Mr Gabriel Pwamang the consultant to the Committee, we say: “...we are grateful to you for your assistance and for bringing your competence, expertise and legal acumen to bear on the work of the Committee.” Read more >>>

This is the Age Distribution of Ghana’s 2010 population of 24.391 million.

This number includes all persons domiciled in Ghana as at 2010 regardless of citizenship.

Although the elections were held in 2012, the voter register was compiled at a time when these were the population distribution

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2013 ushered in the most significant change in the United States’ Africa policy since the passing of PEPFAR 10 years ago. The unveiling of investment-focused initiatives—Power Africa and Trade Africa—reflects not just a change in how the Obama administration views the continent, but also how foreign investors have prioritized it. But policy rarely achieves its objectives without equal attention to implementation. A number of implementation barriers—old regulations and new policies working at cross-purposes, and limited on-the-ground capacity—threaten to undermine America’s new approach to the continent in 2014. If 2013 was marked by change in U.S. strategy towards Africa, 2014 will be marked by the recognition that 90 percent of the success of that strategy is implementation.

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Morality and Leadership  For 2012
Elections are around the corner in both America and Ghana and the airwaves are filled with spin. In the United States, former pizza mogul Herman Cain’s campaign is over due to accusations relating to womanizing and harassment. Here in Ghana, every few days, there are accusations about the moral failings of one candidate or another. There are charges of womanizing, homosexuality, drug use and lack of smarts.
Ghana sits on time bomb – Capt. Koomson
A retired officer of the Ghana Armed Forces, Captain Budu Koomson, believes prevailing conditions in the country make the staging of a coup d’état imminent. This, according to him, was because “the blatant abuse of state wealth by political operatives can trigger something like this coupled with the political stalemate in the society.”
The EC Lied With the Duplicate Polling Station Sheets- NPP-USA
NPP-USA reaffirms its strong conviction in the ongoing petition challenging the legitimacy of John Mahama’s presidency. We have absolute confidence in the astute NPP legal team, so we have restrained ourselves from commenting on legal issues pertaining to the Supreme Court petition. However, when it comes to matters of common sense and logic, we will not hesitate to comment. It is interesting to note the EC has admitted printing of the duplicate polling station sheets and has advanced the argument that they were duplicates to ensure future candidates are covered. NPP-USA posits three strong arguments to invalidate this statement:
The Supreme Court judgment of 29 August 2013 on the Presidential Election Petition raises both legal and jurisprudential questions that the nation has to confront for years to come. It is doubtful if the majority position of dismissing the petition ever took into consideration the wider implications for the promotion and the sustenance of the rule of law, constitutional development, the advancement of democratic aspirations of the country, and the wider national interest.This commentary seeks to address those issues and argue that, the majority in the case failed to appreciate the wider national interest that the case sought to advance.
Is Ghana truly the beacon of hope for democracy in Africa?
Ghanaians went to the polls on Friday 7th and Saturday 8th December 2012 to elect an executive President and 275 Parliamentarians for a four year term January 2013 to December 2016. Less than 48 hours after the voting was closed, the caretaker President H.E. John Dramani Mahama of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) was declared a winner with 5,574,761 votes representing 50.70% of the valid votes cast (10,995,262) by the Chairman of the Electoral Commission (EC), Dr Afari Gyan. According to the EC, the flag bearer and presidential candidate of the NPP got 5,248,898 votes representing 47.74% of the total valid vote cast. The total turnout was 80.15% and the elections was held in 26.002 polling stations across the 10 Regions of the country. For some people in and outside Ghana, including this writer, the result was a big surprise. The Economist Newspaper of 15th December 2012 in a short article over the elections wrote that “Mr Mahama’s victory was surprising”. Reasons for the surprise are explained further in the article.
Politicians should first seek the interest of society - Bawumia
Dr. Mahamud Bawumia, running mate of Nana Akufo Addo, New Patriotic Party (NPP) flagbearer, over the weekend called on politicians to make the interest of society paramount by preaching peace as it was the surest way to develop society. According to him, preaching violence instead of peace would destroy society where everybody would end up as a loser.
Oil production stagnates at 70,000 bpd, falling 50,000 bpd short of 2011 targets as Tullow Oil deploys capital to elsewhere in Africa.
Tullow the operator of Ghana’s Jubilee oil field has fallen six-months short of its own year-end 2011 projections to bring oil production up to 120,000 barrels per day (bpd) from 20,000 bpd in January 2011. In late 2010, before production started at the nascent oil fields, the Anglo-Irish company promised to start production at around 20,000 bpd and ramp up to about 70,000 bpd by mid-2011, and then to 120,000 bpd by the end of 2011. However by mid-2012, Ghana’s oil production is still less than 80,000 bpd. Tullow now promises that Ghana’s oil production will be ramped up to 120,000bpd by 2013, but with lax oversight by the NDC government, that target may prove to be a chimera.
IBM to open Kenya research lab to tackle traffic jams
IBM and the Kenyan government are to open a tech research hub in Nairobi, in a joint attempt to help solve local issues such as traffic congestion.The US firm already has 11 research outposts around the world. It plans to have up to 50 researchers in the new centre within five years, attracting potential candidates from across the continent.
NPP to use oil revenue to fund Free SHS policy
Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo Addo, New Patriotic Party (NPP) presidential candidate, has said under an NPP administration, oil revenue would help fund the Free Senior High School policy that he has proposed. Speaking at the final presidential debate organised by the Institute of Economic Affairs, Akufo-Addo said that, “the most equitable manner in which Ghanaians would benefit from the oil revenue is to ensure that they are used on the two most critical aspects of our national life – education and health care.
Danquah Institute Holds Conference on Biometric Voter Registration and E-Voting
The Danquah Institute, with support from other civil society groups, Development Partners and the Electoral Commission of Ghana, will on Monday, organise a 2-day seminar to interrogate the viability of Electronic Voting and the challenges and advantages of a biometric voter register in Ghana for the 2012 general elections and beyond. It will be the first of Danquah Institute’s Annual Governance & Development Dialogue Series. The two-day conference takes place at the Alisa Hotels, North Ridge, Accra, Ghana, on Feb 8-9, 2010. The first day will be devoted to Biometric Voter Registration; with Day 2 probing the question whether or not e-voting could work in Ghana and if so which model(s) would suit our environment.