As the 20th anniversary of the birth of democracy in South Africa, on April 27 2014, approaches, it seems a perfect opportunity to take a step back and get a long-range perspective on the important question: “So, what has Nelson Mandela’s South Africa done with its freedom?”

Goldman Sachs has produced this report in the hope of contributing to- wards a more balanced narrative on South Africa; one, which in the wake of 2012’s tragic events at Marikana, had become somewhat hysterical, short-term and often negative


The Ministry of Energy has officially laid before Parliament two Petroleum Agreements for ratification following earlier approval by Cabinet. The Agreements are:

  1. Petroleum Agreement among Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, GNPC Exploration and Production Company Limited and AGM Petroleum Ghana LTD in respect of the South Deepwater Tano Contract Area (and shall be called AGM Contract for the purpose of this Analysis).

  2. Petroleum Agreement among Government of the Republic of Ghana, Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, Cola Natural Resources and Medea in respect of East Cape Three Points Contract Area (and shall be called Cola Contract for the purpose of this analysis).

This Advisory Notes is provided to members of Parliament to enrich debate during the consideration of the Agreements. The Notes are based on analysis by the Africa Centre for Energy Policy (ACEP) of the Negotiated Agreements and the memoranda accompanying them. These Notes do not cover most of the subjects in the two Agreements as most of them have common provisions. The focus of the analysis therefore covers subjects that show material differences between the Agreements for the purpose of enriching the debate in parliament.


Accountability and transparency initiatives hav e taken democratisation, governance, aid and development circles by storm since the turn of th e century. Many actors involved with them – as donors, funders, programme managers, implementers and researchers – are now keen to know more about what these initiatives are achieving.

This paper arises from a review of the impact and effectiveness of transparency and accountability initiatives which gathered and analysed existing evidence, discussed how it could be improved, and evaluated how impact and effectiveness could be enhanced. This paper takes the discussion further, by delving into what lies behind the methodological and evaluative debates currently surrounding governance and accountability work. It illustrates how choices about methods are made in the cont ext of impact assessment designs driven by different objectives and different ideological and epistemological underpinnings. We argue that these differences are articulated as methodological debates, obscuring vital issues underlying accountability work, which are about power and politics, not methodological technicalities.


Of late Ghanaians have become obsessed with throwing electoral ‘jargons’ around arising from the recent Election Petition in the Supreme Court of Ghana and most people have overnight turned themselves into Electoral Specialists in view of the enormous interest generated during the petition hearing. However, there are still lack of clarity and understanding in some of the widely used electoral terminologies. The Centre for African Democratic Affairs (CADA) a ‘Think Tank’ of Election Experts, has taken upon itself the challenge to critically examine some of the terms that created confusion in the minds of people during the court proceedings. One of such terminologies is over voting whose definition is still ambiguous even after the ruling of the Supreme Court. CADA therefore discusses the term Over Voting in the first of its series.


Other Stories

Ghana Gas Project is 33% Complete – IMANI Report
We were pleasantly surprised when the Ghana Gas Company responded to our request to tour the ongoing early phase gas infrastructure project (EPGIP) with immediate enthusiasm. We are not used to that from government agencies, and certainly not from agencies involved in the energy sector. GNPC, for instance, is shadowy and arrogant, and aloof and unresponsive to any sense of public accountability or transparency. Not so Ghana Gas, as we discovered to our appreciation. Full Document
Ghana Condemns Coup D'etat In Mali
Ghana yesterday condemned the unwarranted military seizure of power in Mali during the early hours of Thursday, March 22. She has therefore, joined ECOWAS and AU in demanding that the military junta, the National Committee for the Rectification of Democracy and Restoration of the State (CNRDR), and its leader, Captain Amadou Aya Sanogo, take immediate steps to relinquish power and return Mali to legality and constitutional rule.
The term “corruption” is used as a shorthand reference for a large range of illicit or illegal activities. Although there is no universal or comprehensive definition as to what constitutes corrupt behavior, the most prominent definitions share a common emphasis upon the abuse of public power or position for personal advantage. The Oxford Unabridged Dictionary defines corruption as “perversion or destruction of integrity in the discharge of public duties by bribery or favor.” The Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary defines it as “inducement to wrong by improper or unlawful means (as bribery).” The succinct definition utilized by the World Bank is “the abuse of public office for private gain.” This definition is similar to that employed by Transparency International (TI), the leading NGO in the global anticorruption effort: “Corruption involves behavior on the part of officials in the public sector, whether politicians or civil servants, in which they improperly and unlawfully enrich themselves, or those close to them, by the misuse of the public power entrusted to them.” more >>>
Ace Ankomah explains to all ye lay men why Woyome-gate stinks
There are a lot of things flying all around and above us about a man whose name has over the past few months become a noun, a verb, an adjective and any other literary device you may want to attribute it to. I had frankly never heard the name Woyome until the Chronicle blew the lid over some gargantuan amount (with all due respect and the succinct permission of a certain Martin Amidu) to the whole nation. All kinds of people, most of whom have absolutely no background in law nor finance to investigate or the journalism skill to piece together all of the numbers and laws for us all to understand, have been on air, on TV, on social media all seeking to exonerate government or make government look like a bunch of criminals out to dupe Ghana.
What Does the Reshuffle Mean for Developing Countries?
As the dust starts to settle on David Cameron's reshuffle Justine Greening will be starting to make Andrew Mitchell's old office at the Department for International Development (DFID) her own. She may be disappointed at losing her Transport brief, but those of us in the international development community are hopeful that she will soon see all the opportunities available in her new post. In particular, she has the chance to build on the UK's leadership on aid and to go down in the history books as a real leader on one of the big challenges of our time - that of fixing a situation where one in seven people are going to bed hungry despite there being enough food in the world for everyone.
The Deficit In Parliamentary Oversight In The Fight Against Corruption by HON. OSEI-KYEI MENSAH-BUNSO
Before we can proceed to identify the oversight responsibility of Parliament in a democracy, it is imperative to be clear about what our own understanding of ‘democracy’ is. As a concept, democracy is innate and almost universally accepted as both ideal and a goal. It is foundationed on shared values of humanity in spite of cultural, social, political and economic differences which may exist between and among people. The pivotal object of democracy is to protect and promote the fundamental rights of the individual to achieve social justice, facilitate social and economic development of the communities, strengthen the cohesion of society and engender a congenial environment for sustainable peace, domestically and internationally.
DaMina Advisors Frontier Markets Report: Ghana polls, opposition now have edge
Ghana’s new president John Mahama on 1 August picked reclusive central bank governor Paa Kwesi Amissah-Arthur as his nominee for Ghana’s vacant vice presidency. Mahama took office on 25 July when President John Atta Mills succumbed to years of ill health and died suddenly in Accra. Mahama replaced Mills and left his office of vice presidency vacant. Click here to read full report
Mills must grab ethics with long hand of law
As a Cabinet Minister for seven years and the presidential candidate for the ruling party in 2008, Nana Akufo-Addo served the nation with ad admirable level of over-and-above self-imposed ethical principles. These included, not applying for state lands and even refusing to draw on his allocation of fuel, to which every Minister (and others) was entitled. In fact, the story is told of him getting very furious to come back from a trip abroad on an official duty only to find out that his driver had gone to the Castle to claim fuel on his account.However, rather than praising it as exemplifying the kind of leadership that Ghana needs, this has been subjected to charges of “hypocrisy”, “holier-than-thou”, “shopping your colleagues”, etc., against him. He has been put on the defensive for being extra-ethical! Leading this charge have been two the Spokesperson for Vice President John Mahama, John Abu Jinapor. Also notable are pro-Mills newspapers such as, the Insight and Enquirer.
Required proof for criminal allegations in election petitions
It is elementary, yet fundamental, that every criminal allegation must be proved beyond all reasonable doubt to earn a conviction. This much is at the heart of developed theories of criminal justice in many cultures. However, England’s William Blackstone was quoted to have said, “better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer”. Lord Sankey, of the English House of Lords, subsequently summarised the core postulation through his famous ‘Golden Thread’ speech that, “Throughout the web of the English Criminal Law, one golden thread is always to be seen, that it is the duty of the prosecution to prove the prisoner’s guilt…If at the end of the case, there is a reasonable doubt created by the evidence given by either the prosecution or the prisoner,…..the prosecution has not made out the case and the prisoner is entitled to an acquittal. No matter what the charge and where the trial, the principle that the prosecution must prove the guilt of the prisoner is part of the Common Law of England and no attempt to whittle it down can be entertained” Woolmington v DPP (1935) AC 462.