The Let My Vote Count Alliance has taken due notice of the decision by President John Dramani Mahama to appoint Mrs. Charlotte Osei, 42, as Chairperson of the Electoral Commission (EC) of Ghana. We wish to greet her with this clarion message: NO NEW REGISTER NO VOTE IN 2016!

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Public policy and governance think tank, the Danquah Institute has expressed grave concern about the Electoral Commission's decision to register all persons in the country who, simply, are in possession of identity cards issued by the National Health Insurance Authority.

At a press conference organised by DI last week, a fellow of the institute, Mr. Boakye Agyarko, explained that “one of the objects of the National Health Insurance Authority” as captured on the NHIA’s website which states that “persons not resident in the country but who are on a visit to this country” can obtain NHIS cards is deeply worrying.

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NPA’s Arrogance or Economics?

On the eve of the New Year, 2015, the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) announced a reduction in ex-pump prices of petroleum products by 10% across board. This was not without drama. Most of the headlines that followed the announcement pointed to price reduction under duress. A number of civil society organizations and political parties put pressure on NPA to reduce the prices due to reasons such as the oil price crush and relative stability in the value of the local Ghanaian currency. Some of the organizations threatened public demonstrations against NPA and the Government; a situation that was expected considering that petro-politics is a feature of petroleum pricing in most parts of the world.

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FITCH Rating’s latest report on Ghana lays particular emphasis on the importance of Ghana’s democracy and stability to the country’s economic prospects. Whiles it gives a negative outlook based on how the economy is being run, Fitch makes the point that Ghana’s credit rating has not, however, fallen below ‘B’ because of the country’s “strong governance record and recent democratic history,” and that, this is “reflected in Ghana’s ability to attract foreign direct investment, which at 7% of GDP is well above that of Nigeria, Gabon, Zambia, Kenya and Angola.”

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Other Stories

How can one define a ‘democratic election procedure’ in the light of proposals to introduce Remote Voting by Electronic Mean s (RVEM)? Are there any general characteristics of an election procedure which define it as democratic?The central question is quite separate fr om ‘how can one define a democracy?’ A crude definition of a democracy is a state in which the rulers are chosen by the people and exercise power with their consent. 1 More sophisticated definitions require, at least, a definition of ‘people’ , ‘ruler’, ‘power’ and ‘consen t’ and it would seem that a number of politically acceptable definitions of each of these terms exist in the world or even within a single polity. For example, there is no single defi nition of ‘people’ in the United Kingdom which takes into accoun t the different groups who may, or may not, vote for representatives in the various tiers of local government, the Westminster Parliament, the Scottish Parliament, th e Welsh Assembly, the Northern Ireland Assembly and the European Parliament. 2. Within the electorates for those bodies there are a number of differing qualifications to be registered as a voter and the methods of election differ one from another. Read More >>>
Petitioners' comments on draft KPMG report
We act for the Petitioners in the presidential election petition, Writ No. J6/1/2013. We have examined your draft addressed to the Judicial Service of Ghana and dated June, 2013 together with four (4) volumes of annexures thereto and submit the following observations thereon: Click here for petitioners' comments
Statement at the Conclusion of an IMF Mission to Ghana
A mission from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), led by Christina Daseking, visited Accra during May 16-29, 2012, to conduct discussions for the sixth and seventh review under the IMF’s Extended Credit Facility. The mission met with President John Evans Atta Mills, Finance Minister Kwabena Duffuor, Bank of Ghana Governor Kwesi Amissah-Arthur, other senior officials, members of the Economic Advisory Council, and representatives of the private sector and civil society.
'Let My Vote Count Alliance' Still defiant…. As Madina Police grants them bail
Members of the ‘Let My Vote Count Alliance’ have insisted they will continue with the group’s crusade and activities to educate Ghanaians on the high profiled petition at the Supreme Court involving a challenge of the election of President Mahama by Nana Akufo-Addo and Co. This is in spite of a recent invitation by the Police after the groups hugely attended rally at the Taifa Noway park.
Arab Awakening, Act 2
THINK OF the revolutions in the Middle East as Act 1 in a five-act play that may not conclude for a generation or more. Nearly a year since protests in Tunisia ignited a regional wave of reform and revolt, the euphoria and hope of last January has turned to frustration and cynicism as Egyptians battle their military government in Cairo and sectarian war in Syria intensifies. The Arab world may be heading for an unpredictable and violent Act 2 in 2012.
P/NDC supporters have one myth that they hold dear, to wit, J. A. Kuffuor packed the courts to secure the conviction of Tsatsu Tsikata. Not only is this mythical, it is equally claptrap and hooey. It is well known that Tsatsu was convicted by one judge, who incidentally was appointed by Chairman JJR long before JAK became President, Judge Henrietta Abban, who was maligned and harassed for just doing her job.
Africa’s tax systems: progress, but what is the next generation of reforms?
Taxation is zipping up the development agenda, but the discussion is often focussed on international aspects such as tax havens or the Robin Hood Tax. Both very important, but arguably, even more important is what happens domestically – are developing country tax systems regressive or progressive? Are they raising enough cash to fund state services? Are they efficient and free of corruption? This absolutely magisterial overview of the state of tax systems in Africa comes from Mick Moore (right), who runs the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD). It was first published by the Africa Research Institute. Anglophone countries have led the way in reforming tax administration in Africa, considerably more so than their francophone peers. The reasons for this are numerous. Networks of international tax specialists are based mainly in English-speaking countries. Many of the modern systems that promote best practice within tax authorities were developed in anglophone countries, especially Australia. International donors, and particularly the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), have directly and indirectly promoted a lot of reform of national tax authorities. In fact, this has been one of the success stories of British aid.
100 years ago, when the founding father of Adisadel, Bishop Hamlyn, admitted the first intake of students to the SPG grammar school at Topp Yard, even he could not have foreseen the great contribution the school would make to our national development. Throughout the history of Ghana, Santacluasians have been at the forefront of our national development. They were very active in the independence struggle, with some paying dearly for their role in the mobilisation of students for the struggle. Not surprisingly, on March 6th 1957, 2 santaclausians - Kojo Botsio and K Gbedemah - flanked Kwame Nkrumah at the rally where the independence proclamation was made. Adisadel has produced a Head of State, 3 Chief Justices, 3 Speakers of Parliament, the first Ghanaian Navy Captain among others. The culture of sportsmanship has always been an important part of the school curriculum. The founding fathers considered sports every bit as important as intellectual persuit. Little wonder that over the years, old santaclausians have been active in the promotion and administration of sports at the national level,our illustrious Headmaster, R.T. Orleans Pobee and the late Sam Nelson to mention but a few. By any measure, Adisco has made an immense contribution to the development of the human capital of our nation.
Ghana - On the Ground: Outlook For Elections Following President's Death
BMI View: BMI's on-the-ground research has revealed key insight into Ghana's upcoming December 2012 elections. The ruling NDC party is likely to get some sympathy votes following the recent death of President John Atta Mills, but the new President John Mahama has got his work cut out in garnering support, with only a few months to campaign. A high proportion of voters are unsure who they will vote for, so the race remains wide open. However, the newly-formed NDP is unlikely to gain much traction.
Press reports on President Mills' death
Ghana has seen a smooth transition of power after the sudden death of its president, but as the nation mourns attention is already turning to who will replace him as the ruling party's candidate in a December vote. Vice-President John Dramani Mahama was sworn in hours after the announcement of the death through sudden illness on Tuesday of 68-year-old President John Atta Mills.