The Let My Vote Count Alliance has taken due notice of the decision by President John Dramani Mahama to appoint Mrs. Charlotte Osei, 42, as Chairperson of the Electoral Commission (EC) of Ghana. We wish to greet her with this clarion message: NO NEW REGISTER NO VOTE IN 2016!

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Public policy and governance think tank, the Danquah Institute has expressed grave concern about the Electoral Commission's decision to register all persons in the country who, simply, are in possession of identity cards issued by the National Health Insurance Authority.

At a press conference organised by DI last week, a fellow of the institute, Mr. Boakye Agyarko, explained that “one of the objects of the National Health Insurance Authority” as captured on the NHIA’s website which states that “persons not resident in the country but who are on a visit to this country” can obtain NHIS cards is deeply worrying.

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NPA’s Arrogance or Economics?

On the eve of the New Year, 2015, the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) announced a reduction in ex-pump prices of petroleum products by 10% across board. This was not without drama. Most of the headlines that followed the announcement pointed to price reduction under duress. A number of civil society organizations and political parties put pressure on NPA to reduce the prices due to reasons such as the oil price crush and relative stability in the value of the local Ghanaian currency. Some of the organizations threatened public demonstrations against NPA and the Government; a situation that was expected considering that petro-politics is a feature of petroleum pricing in most parts of the world.

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FITCH Rating’s latest report on Ghana lays particular emphasis on the importance of Ghana’s democracy and stability to the country’s economic prospects. Whiles it gives a negative outlook based on how the economy is being run, Fitch makes the point that Ghana’s credit rating has not, however, fallen below ‘B’ because of the country’s “strong governance record and recent democratic history,” and that, this is “reflected in Ghana’s ability to attract foreign direct investment, which at 7% of GDP is well above that of Nigeria, Gabon, Zambia, Kenya and Angola.”

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Other Stories

OBAMA’S VISIT – WHAT’S IN IT FOR US AND U.S.?
Abstract This article argues that in the excitement surrounding President Obama’s July visit to Ghana, what has been missing is an analysis of what is in it for the United States, an understanding of which is crucial for Ghana if it is to capitalise on the immense opportunity provided by this trip.Highlighting the significance of the deepwater oil find in 2007, the article sets out why Ghana is now the subject of strategic U.S. energy and military interests which, as far as the Obama administration is concerned, has raised the stakes considerably in Ghana–United States relations. As the potential gem in the crown of what Washington terms Africa's ‘New Gulf’, the article highlights how Ghana’s pending oil-rich status will shift the terms of negotiation during the trip.
The Tory party has lost sight of its true values
The latest polls will not make for happy reading in No 10. After a torrid post-Budget fortnight, Labour has a strong lead. If there was an election tomorrow, they would be returned with a big majority. In 43 years as a volunteer for the Tory party, I have always believed that the values of our activists have been at the heart of our electoral success. Yet, in recent times, there has been an almost evangelical focus on the “modernisation” or “detoxification” of the Conservative brand. The result has been a growing disconnect between the party leadership and the grassroots, and a loss of clarity, principle and policy direction.
The modern state of Ghana was formed in 1957 from several territorial units administered under British colonial authority. These included the Gold Coast Colony, the traditional state of Ashanti, the Northern Territories Protectorate, and the Trust Territory of British Togo land. Early nationalist movements were active primarily within the Gold Coast Colony, which had achieved some measure of indigenous participation in governmental organs by 1946. Prominent in the movement for self-government was J.B. Danquah, instrumental in the founding of the United Gold Coast Convention (UGCC) in 1946 and Kwame Nkrumah, who formed the Convention People's Party (CPP) two years later.
The Danquah Institute, a policy think tank, has cautioned against plans of the government to return to the discredited old policy of selecting, by discretion, 30% of first year Senior High School students from catchment areas. While welcoming the policy to ensure that the local people are given a special allocation to schools in their areas, DI disagrees with the discretionary manner the Government intends to have the policy implemented. In his State of the Nation address to Parliament, President JEA Mills said, “We have noted that the rate at which the computerized placement mechanism is blocking access to second cycle education by pupils from basic schools in the catchment area.”
Ex-Prez Kufuor: A Vote For NDC Will Be “A Big Mistake”
Ex-President John Agyekum Kufuor has reiterated the need for Ghanaians to be guided by the unequaled track record of the last New Patriotic Party (NPP) government when casting their ballots on December 7.Mr. Kufuor noted that it is imperative for electorates to vote for a team-led leadership saying, Nana Akufo-Addo has the best team to transform Ghana.
FACTBOX: Political risks to watch in Ghana
The start of commercial oil production in 2010 has helped promote Ghana into the ranks of the world's lower middle-income nations, fuelling hopes of ending a dependence on aid and forging a future as one of Africa's star economies. While President John Atta Mills's government is seen to have done well in knocking public finances into shape since 2008, elections are due in December and the country's deficit is being strained by a high wage and fuel subsidy bill. The Bank of Ghana is tightening monetary policy to fend off mounting inflation pressures and stabilise the sliding cedi currency.
The future of Ghana's Democracy lies with values and ideas…
No society has been able to sustainably develop its human and physical resources to affect the most of its people without a strong values system. The competition of Ideas they say are the vehicles of transformation but even that requires values to guide it. The Danquah Institute recognizes that a society without values is one in retrogression.  The Institute therefore places high premium on the interactions and exposures that help to build confident and patriotic citizens with integrity.
Ghana’s inflation rate rose in February for the second consecutive month as a 30 percent jump in gasoline costs at the beginning of the year pushed up transportation fees. Inflation accelerated to 9.2 percent from 9.1 percent in January, Grace Bediako, head of the Ghana Statistical Service, told reporters today in the capital, Accra. “With most of the upward pressure on inflation arising from the 30 percent fuel-price increase in the new year, February inflation should still be up,” Razia Khan, head of Africa research at Standard Chartered Bank Plc in London, said in an e-mailed note yesterday.
Has Mills lost touch with honesty?
President Mills returned from New York on New Year’s Eve to say that his Christmas trip was so successful that he had “killed two birds with one stone.” He didn’t exactly manage Zita Okaikoi’s feat of “killing two stones with one bird” on her trip to New York, where she had a baby and attended to some tourism duties. Our President, essentially, took an early holiday in New York in order to work during the Christmas break in New York. Bless him! Koku Anyidoho, reportedly, briefed journalists at the Kotoka International Airport on Christmas Eve, the day of Mills’ surprise departure, saying that the President was returning to America, a week after his last trip there, to follow-up with some US investors he met at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).
IMANI Special Report on the STX-Ghana Deal
Introduction Since the STX-Ghana deal took its sour turn towards controversy, many people have asked us, usually privately, what a pro-market organisation such as ours is doing “opposing” a business deal that seems to benefit the private sector more than the public sector. Quite apart from the fact that such a question betrays a woeful lack of understanding of the “free market” it is also unfair to our actual position on the STX-Ghana matter.