This is the Age Distribution of Ghana’s 2010 population of 24.391 million.

This number includes all persons domiciled in Ghana as at 2010 regardless of citizenship.

Although the elections were held in 2012, the voter register was compiled at a time when these were the population distribution

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2013 ushered in the most significant change in the United States’ Africa policy since the passing of PEPFAR 10 years ago. The unveiling of investment-focused initiatives—Power Africa and Trade Africa—reflects not just a change in how the Obama administration views the continent, but also how foreign investors have prioritized it. But policy rarely achieves its objectives without equal attention to implementation. A number of implementation barriers—old regulations and new policies working at cross-purposes, and limited on-the-ground capacity—threaten to undermine America’s new approach to the continent in 2014. If 2013 was marked by change in U.S. strategy towards Africa, 2014 will be marked by the recognition that 90 percent of the success of that strategy is implementation.

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We, members of the Electoral Reforms Committee wish to thank the almighty God for the strength, health and travelling mercies granted us throughout our various meetings, discussions and retreat sessions held outside Accra in executing our mandate as spelt out in our Terms of Reference. We thank the Chairman and Members of the Electoral Commission for giving us the opportunity to serve mother Ghana.

To Mr Gabriel Pwamang the consultant to the Committee, we say: “...we are grateful to you for your assistance and for bringing your competence, expertise and legal acumen to bear on the work of the Committee.” Read more >>>

The Let My Vote Count Alliance has taken due notice of the decision by President John Dramani Mahama to appoint Mrs. Charlotte Osei, 42, as Chairperson of the Electoral Commission (EC) of Ghana. We wish to greet her with this clarion message: NO NEW REGISTER NO VOTE IN 2016!

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Tullow Oil plc - Half year results
This presentation contains certain forward-looking statements that are subject to the usual risk factors and uncertainties associated with the oil and gas exploration and production business. Whilst Tullow believes the expectations reflected herein to be reasonable in light of the information available to them at this time, the actual outcome may be materially different owing to factors beyond the Group’s control or within the Group’s control where, for example, the Group decides on a change of plan or strategy. Click here for full document
Government Must Explain Its Commitments To RLG’s $10 Billion ‘Hope City’ PPP Project
The Danquah Institute, like well-meaning citizens and entities in Ghana, is excited by the announcement made by the Chief Executive Officer of rlg communications, Mr Roland Agambire, that it plans to build Africa's tallest building, and ICT infrastructure to create value-adding jobs and put Ghana at the centre of the global ICT market. Even more exciting is the fact that rlg has, by this US$10 billion project, called Hope City, made a huge leap to what it announced earlier in December last year, that it was to begin by January this year the construction of a US$100 million technology park in Ghana. See http://www.ventures-africa.com/2012/12/rlg-to-build-100m-technology-centre-in-ghana/
TWO DECADES OF FREEDOM: What South Africa Is Doing With It, And What Now Needs To Be Done
As the 20th anniversary of the birth of democracy in South Africa, on April 27 2014, approaches, it seems a perfect opportunity to take a step back and get a long-range perspective on the important question: “So, what has Nelson Mandela’s South Africa done with its freedom?” Goldman Sachs has produced this report in the hope of contributing to- wards a more balanced narrative on South Africa; one, which in the wake of 2012’s tragic events at Marikana, had become somewhat hysterical, short-term and often negative
Dr J B Danquah, Ghana's President we never had (Part 1)
The image and memorabilia of some very prominent patriots who have spent the whole of their time struggling for the ideals of good governance and self-government have been pushed under the carpets of some so-called new era politicians. As to who did what in the past, bringing about the present that they have come to inherit, that will lead us into the future is not their concern.
Mitt Romney's poor judgment is already undermining his candidacy
Finally, Obama's opponent has been confirmed, but can the Republican nominee mount an effective challenge? I doubt you will ever find a politician more desperate to believe Nietzsche's aphorism that whatever doesn't kill us makes us stronger than Mitt Romney. With former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum announcing that he is suspending his presidential campaign, it ensures what many political observers have assumed for quite some time – that Mitt Romney will be the Republican nominee for president this autumn.
DI holds forum on $3 billion Chinese loan
The Danquah Institute in collaboration with its media partners, Citi FM and Hot FM, is holding a forum on the $3 billion Chinese loan on Tuesday, 18th October 2011. The forum is similar to the one organised by the institute which scrutinised the STX Housing project where serious objections were raised with regards to certain aspects of the loan. These objections resulted in major changes being made to the agreement, and has subsequently saved this country billions of dollars.
Obama's Africa Policy
Africans regard the American president very much as one of their own. That much has been evident ever since Barack Obama, the American son of a Kenyan, emerged as a presidential candidate in 2007. And President Obama, to his credit, has a good feel for the Africans. He should. This son of an American-trained African academic spent a lot of vacation time visiting with his Kenyan family long before it became clear that he had eyes for the American presidency. Those visits enabled Obama's African relatives to adjudge him a fine human being for his down-to-earth ways and how easily he adapted to their simple ways.It is perhaps not surprising, therefore, that Africans hung so much of their hopes on Obama and greeted his election, in November 2008, as the first African-American president of the United States of America, with pride and euphoria and great expectations. A continent blighted, since the middle of the 20th century, by repeated setbacks resulting from poor governance, corruption and underdevelopment saw possibilities of rescue in the election of President Obama.
Under her Model Petroleum Agreement (MPA), Ghana, a newcomer in the global oil industry has adopted the Royalty Tax System to govern the fiscal regime for the country’s petroleum sector. Even before production tentatively begins in 2010 when the agreement would be put to test, critics say that Ghana would obtain greater financial benefit under the terms of a production-sharing contract (PSC). This paper discusses Ghana’s MPA and contrasts this to the argument that the country would benefit from using PSCs. The paper describes the MPA, the advantages and disadvantages of an R/T system and those of the PSC System. The paper exceeds the argument that form matters, and points to the importance of either systems having to achieve a stable consensus between the main parties involved. more >>>
From The EU to The AU, Is Greece a lesson for Africa?
Many talk about the possibility of an African Union, similar to that of the European Union we have today. And yes Africa does have an African union, but I am talking more on the functioning and the stability of its institutions in a way that best benefits the continent and people of Africa. When these talks arise passion often merged with frustration engulfs the debate as people from all spectrums, journalists, country men, those from the Diaspora throw into the mix their reasons as to why Africa is not ready to follow in the “golden” footsteps of the EU. And so the tirade begins: “African leaders are too corrupt to even contemplate a viable functioning AU”, “Unlike Europe Africa does not have the institutions to embark on such an ambitious project”, “Africans are too busy fighting one another to even think about working together”, “the West have done everything they can to insure that Africa is not united and will never be” and so the debate proceeds.
There is no way to miss the point of yesterday’s midterm elections. The American people are deeply frustrated with how they are being governed. The political debate is at an all-time partisan low and the public over the last three election cycles are calling for something, almost anything, to change that. They want to see progress on the economy, on job creation, on taxes, and on the federal budget deficit. No matter how voters cast their ballots these are the issues that voters want their representatives in Congress to address. Now. This overarching voter mandate to “fix it” delivers with it a set of responsibilities to the incoming Republican leadership of the House of Representatives and their strengthened minority counterparts in the Senate as well as to Democratic leaders in the Senate and President Barack Obama and his administration. For the Republicans this means they need to become partners in governing our nation. They can no longer be the “party of no” after yesterday’s vote. Republican leaders must craft serious legislative proposals to match the serious problems our country faces today and in the future.