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Nigeria's gross government revenues rose for the second consecutive month in June to 485.95 billion naira ($2.44 billion), up 33 percent from May, the finance ministry said.

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The European Union has moved to check emigration from West Africa by voting to invest 1.15 billion euros in aid for West Africa through to 2020.

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With both the West and East now courting Nairobi, President Kenyatta must decide how to do business with allies both old and new.

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Ghana is likely to clear the first review of its $918 million programme with the International Monetary Fund and secure a fresh disbursement of funds aimed at stabilising its economy.

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In the last fifteen years a problem has presented itself to the courts in the form of a limitation on a power which, prior to this time, most courts had come to consider as axiomatic. This was the power to punish for contempt. In its broadest sense, this power had existed in the courts from the time of their inception, founded in a public policy which regarded it as an attribute both inherent and necessary for the protection of the judicial function.' While never entirely above regulation, 2 restriction upon any aspect of its exercise was re- garded as a matter of immediate concern to the courts in which it vested. Thus, when Bridges v. California 3 decided in 1941 that the power of state courts to impose criminal punishment for contempt on individuals who, by public comment, attempt to exert influence over judicial proceedings was subject to the freedoms of speech and press guaranteed by the First Amendment, the decision was looked upon by many writers with varying degrees of alarm. 4 Nor was it unnatural that the flood of commentaries which the case evoked should deal primarily with the long range effects of the decision, rather than to attempt more than a surface analysis of the holding itself. Viewing the law as it developed out of the Bridges case and the ones which followed, it is felt that there is a need for clarification of this nebulous field, and to submit an interpretation which, it is hoped, represents the law as it stands today. Full Document
The Struggle for Independence and the Unique Role of the United Gold Coast Convention
The independence of Ghana, appeared to be a mirage, until the United Gold Coast Convention was birthed on 4th August, 1947 at Saltpond; thankfully, its formation became the springboard towards our attainment of Statehood. The independence of Ghana was not realized on a silver platter; as a matter of fact, it took years of struggle, pain, disappointment, betrayal, and even deaths before we were able to gain freedom from our colonial overlords—the British. The patriots, who sacrificed their energy, resources, and lives deserve commendation, and must be celebrated.
Uganda ministers Bumba and Makubuya resign after probe
The committee said President Yoweri Museveni was not responsible for the compensation sum paid out Two cabinet ministers in Uganda at the centre of a corruption scandal have resigned. They agreed to step down after a parliamentary investigation found they had illegally paid out millions of dollars to a city businessman.
12 years later, Florida comes to Ghana with an Israeli twist
I would like to begin by offering thanks to the Ghanaian readers who offered such passionate comments to my articles during the Presidential campaign. Though I left Ghana shortly after Election Day, I fully enjoyed my experience observing and commenting on the vibrant Ghanaian political scene.
Revealed: Britons to be asked for NI number, date of birth and signature to get right to vote
Every Briton will be asked to hand over their National Insurance number and signature to keep their right to vote, under new plans. The information will be added to local electoral registers and held at city halls across the country, raising concerns about the security of the data. The Government also admitted that the new plans could discourage people from voting.Last night campaigners sounded the alarm about the plans, which are to be introduced after July, suggesting that the breadth of information which will be held by councils will present “the perfect kit for identity fraud”.
Ghana: Assessing Risks to Stability
Ghana's prospects for long-term stability are being undermined by important structural weaknesses. the political system is highly centralised, the executive is excessively powerful, and patronage politics is corroding public institutions. Social pressures are building due to the slow decline of the country's agricultural sector and its inability to provide jobs for its growing workforce. In the next 5 to 10 years, the main threats to Ghanaian stability will stem from the social and macroeconomic impact of its new oil export sector, the influence of drug trafficking on its political system, and youth unemployment. more>>>
IMANI Alert: Parliament SHOULD NOT Approve Shady Housing Deal
Upon reviewing the ‘order paper’ laid before the current session of Parliament on the 16th of August 2012, IMANI has concluded that item F(II) on the order paper should not have advanced from committee level in the first place much less laid before the full House. Item F (II) – Report of the Joint Committee on Finance and Works & Housing
Full Speech: Dzi Wo Fie Asem, Rhetoric and the Politics of Expediency
Over the past two weeks or so when the topic of today’s lecture was announced in the media, many friends and colleagues have called, to express concern, that I had chosen a topic that they wouldn’t have touched with a long spoon. Was this the safest topic I could have chosen? Then came a message from a colleague in the Facebook who said, ‘Prof, are you sure the national security is not going to confiscate your script?’ Then last Sunday, I met another friend after church who promised to attend this talk, but said, “Owo Kwesi, Eye abofra bon, paa!” more>>>
Is Danquah Institute’s Warning/Threat of Legal Action Against the EC is Folly?
The Danquah Institute is reported to have warned the Electoral Commission not to create new constituencies based on the boundaries of new forty two districts that are soon to be created. The Institute further threatened to challenge the Electoral Commission at the court if the EC creates new constituencies based on the new districts (see “DI Warns: EC Cannot Create New Constituencies Based on New District”, Ghanaweb 19 March 2012). The thrust of their argument were that, the government by creating the new districts is compelling the Electoral Commission to create new constituencies based on the boundaries of new districts.
Enough of the Rhetorics: Ghanaians Need Sustainable Solutions To The Energy Crisis.
The frustrations of Ghanaians keep growing by the day at the inability of elected officials to show leadership in the handling of the energy crisis that currently engulfs the entire space of Ghana. From children and schools that need light for their studies at night, the hospital laboratories and theatres needing reliable power to save lives, the cottage and large scale factories in the villages and cities respectively that need reliable and affordable power to sustainably remain competitive with the global trends, Ghanaians are simply tired of the regular excuses and description of age old problems by policy makers without actions to resolving them. And the Danquah Institute fully identifies with the plight of these ordinary Ghanaians, who have to continuously bear with this unbearable circumstance without the benefit of any reasonable hope of a lasting solution to the current energy crisis situation from its elected leaders, enabled by their mandate to solve these problems on their behalf.