Elections are around the corner in both America and Ghana and the airwaves are filled with spin. In the United States, former pizza mogul Herman Cain’s campaign is over due to accusations relating to womanizing and harassment.

Here in Ghana, every few days, there are accusations about the moral failings of one candidate or another. There are charges of womanizing, homosexuality, drug use and lack of smarts.


An Accra High Court (Cocoa Affairs, Court 11) presided over by His Lordship Patrick Baayeh has handed down a heavy judgement on the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) and Tema Oil Refinery (TOR) in a case in which three plaintiffs accused the NPAand TOR of inflating fuel prices and using the money for hidden purposes. more>>

The Executive Director of the Danquah Institute Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko is mocking government’s attempt to reverse the falling standards in education. Results released by the West African Examination Council show that over half of the students who sat for this year’s Basic Education Certificate Exams failed and could not proceed to the Second Cycle Education.

It is reported to be the worst performance in 13 years.


THINK OF the revolutions in the Middle East as Act 1 in a five-act play that may not conclude for a generation or more. Nearly a year since protests in Tunisia ignited a regional wave of reform and revolt, the euphoria and hope of last January has turned to frustration and cynicism as Egyptians battle their military government in Cairo and sectarian war in Syria intensifies.

The Arab world may be heading for an unpredictable and violent Act 2 in 2012.


Other Stories

Written Address of Counsel for John Mahama
On the 7th and 8th days of December, 2012, Ghana held its presidential and parliamentary elections. The presidential election was contested by seven (7) candidates who were sponsored by political parties and one (1) other who contested as an independent candidate. The 1st respondent was the candidate of the John Dramani Mahama. The elections were originally fixed for 7th December, 2012. Polls in certain polling stations were adjourned to 8th December, 2012, owing to the alleged failure of the biometric verification devices (BVD).
Important Questions For The Electoral Commission From Danquah Institute
Friday, October 30, 2015, is the opportunity for parties, organisations and journalists at the two-day public forum on the voters’ register to ask the Electoral Commission questions and hopefully get answers that can help decide whether Ghana will have a new register or not.
NPP CONDEMNS NDC PLAN FOR ‘CIVIL WAR’ -If Supreme Court Declares Akufo-Addo President
The New Patriotic Party has expressed serious concern about the continuous silence of the National Peace Council and other civil society organisations over comments by leading members of the National Democratic Congress that point to a plan to plunge the nation into chaos if the verdict of the Supreme Court hearing the 2012 election petition should go in favour of the petitioners. President John Dramani Mahama recently told NDC activists he won the 2012 presidential election “cleanly and fairly” and that he was confident the Supreme Court would re-affirm that victory.
Politicians should first seek the interest of society - Bawumia
Dr. Mahamud Bawumia, running mate of Nana Akufo Addo, New Patriotic Party (NPP) flagbearer, over the weekend called on politicians to make the interest of society paramount by preaching peace as it was the surest way to develop society. According to him, preaching violence instead of peace would destroy society where everybody would end up as a loser.
In the highly volatile world of oil and gas contracting, the common law principle that all contracts entered into should be performed in good faith, often finds itself threatened by attempts by host governments to re-negotiate contracts, and in more severe cases, attempts at expropriation or nationalisation. The basis on which states are able to do this almost unflinchingly is the international law concept of State Sovereignty. One of the ways by which international oil companies have sought cover against such situations is by the inclusion of stabilization clauses (in whatever shape or form) in international oil agreements. How can Ghana ensure that, unlike the controversies in the mining sector, the stabilisation clauses in oil contracts strike a proper balance between investor interest and national interest?
Ghana's debt hits $13.9 billion and growing
Ghana’s total debt has doubled in just two years under President JEA Mills. Documents available to the Danquah Institute indicate that Ghana’s total debt is $13.9 billion currently. At the end of 2008, when the New Patriotic Party left office, Ghana’s domestic debt stood at GH¢4.8 billion (or $3.170bn in today’s exchange rate). At the end of 2010, under the National Democratic Congress, this had shot up to Ghc8.28bn ($5.47bn).
Democracy at a standstill: A report from The Economist Intelligence Unit
This is the fifth edition of the Economist Intelligence Unit’s Democracy index. It reflects the situation at the end of 2012. In 2012 global democracy was at a standstill in the sense that there was neither significant progress nor regression in democracy in that year. Average regional scores in 2012 were very similar to scores in 2011. The first edition of the index, published in The Economist’s The World in 2007, measured the state of democracy in September 2006; the second edition covered the situation towards the end of 2008; the third as of November 2010 and the fourth at the end of 2011. The index provides a snapshot of the state of democracy worldwide for 165 independent states and two territories—this covers almost the entire population of the world and the vast majority of the world’s states (micro states are excluded). The Democracy index is based on five categories: electoral process and pluralism; civil liberties; the functioning of government; political participation; and political culture. Countries are placed within one of four types of regimes: full democracies; flawed democracies; hybrid regimes; and authoritarian regimes. Full Document
Providing Homes for the People - How Property-Owning Democracy was Bastardised
March 2009 is ending with agitation over Ga lands and the threat of a similar agitation in the Western Region. In my view all this could have been effectively avoided or neutralised if only the New Patriotic Party was steadfast and more radical in its realisation of the dream of a property-owning democracy.In April 4, 2007, I wrote an article explaining ‘Development in Freedom’ – the slogan of the NPP –– the party of proponents of free market and developmentalism like Danquah, Busia and Dombo That article argues, fundamental to the doctrine of Danquah-Busiaism is the principle that freedom is the primary end as well as the active means to development.
The first accused person namely Charles Wereko Brobbey, was the Chief Executive Officer of the Ghana @ 50 Secretariat. The second accused Kwadwo Okyere Impiani was the Chairman of the National Planning Committee of the staff of Ghana @ 50 Celebration. The second accused was also the former Chief of Staff and Minister for Presidential Affairs under the government of former President J.A. Kuffour. The two have been charged before this court with four counts of wilfully Causing Financial Loss to the State contrary to Section 179A (3) (a) of the Criminal Offences Act, 1960 (Act 29). The two have pleaded not guilty to all the four counts. Before the prosecution could start adducing evidence to discharge its burden, the accused persons separately filed two motions on notice challenging the jurisdiction of this court in trying them. The application filed by the first accused on the 24th May 2010, prayed as follows:
In 1956, France implemented a series of institutional reforms that effectively allowed its African colonies to opt for integration with France instead of pursuing autonomous existence as independent states. Just two years later, France, under the leadership of Charles de Gaulle, offered the colonies, under the auspices of the Constitution of the French Fifth Republic, free association as autonomous republics within the Communauté française (French Community). Guinea was the only territory in France’s so-called Afrique noire to vote “Non” to de Gaulle’s proposal. Ivory Coast voted “Oui” as its elites saw Guinea’s total rejection of de Gaulle’s offer as not very pragmatic. Of course, within the new community, France would retain senior status and the former colonies would come in as junior partners. Nevertheless, leaders of the Francophone African colonies soon realized that they could opt for independence and still retain close and productive ties with France. Thus, following the lead of the former UN Trust Territory of Cameroons under French administration, which gained independence on January 1, 1960, Ivory Coast withdrew from the French Community and on August 7, 1960, declared its independence. However, it was not until October 31, 1960 that the National Assembly adopted a constitutional draft.