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This weekend the African National Congress celebrates its centenary. The party, which played a pivotal role in the overthrow of apartheid in South Africa, has much to look back on with pride, and the celebrations include concerts, church services and a mass political rally.

Compared with other African liberation movements, the ANC had the unique ability to unite diverse groups. The others were formed on the basis of one ethnic or regional group, and could never transcend this. The ANC created a broad alliance that spanned the ideological spectrum, from shopkeepers to communists, and became what was called a "multi-class" organisation.

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President Mills returned from New York on New Year’s Eve to say that his Christmas trip was so successful that he had “killed two birds with one stone.” He didn’t exactly manage Zita Okaikoi’s feat of “killing two stones with one bird” on her trip to New York, where she had a baby and attended to some tourism duties. Our President, essentially, took an early holiday in New York in order to work during the Christmas break in New York. Bless him!

Koku Anyidoho, reportedly, briefed journalists at the Kotoka International Airport on Christmas Eve, the day of Mills’ surprise departure, saying that the President was returning to America, a week after his last trip there, to follow-up with some US investors he met at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

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Partners in Ghana's Jubilee offshore oilfield, operated by Tullow Oil, have bought a Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel from Tokyo-listed Modec, Ghana's state oil company GNPC said on Friday.

Sources close to the deal said it valued the "Kwame Nkrumah" vessel, which was leased to the Jubilee partners for its first year of operation, at $750 million.

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The world has experienced phenomenal growth of financial services over the last couple of decades. This globalization has led to increased cross-border activities enhancing global financial intermediation. Unfortunately, this development has been accompanied by a spate of transnational organized crime including Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing (ML/TF) perpetuated by underground economies.

Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing affect whole economies, and therefore impacts negatively on economic, political and social development, posing serious challenges to all countries.

Click here for full Report

Other Stories

Parliament shouldn’t approve $3bn Chinese commercial loan
The Parliamentary Joint Committee of Finance and Poverty Reduction is currently meeting in Koforidua (Tuesday, August 16 – Saturday, August 20) ostensibly to scrutinise, among others, a US$3 billion commercial term loan facility between the Republic of Ghana and the China Development Bank (CDB) to finance a series of projects, including the Achimota-Ofankor Road, a $150 communications infrastructure for the National Security Council, and a $100 million capacity building exercise for Ghanaian SMEs.
Voter Registration Can Make or Break an Election By Nana Attobrah Quaicoe, DI
Distinguished Guests, the Media, Ladies and Gentlemen, the Danquah Institute was invited by the coalition of pressure groups agitating for a new register to come and share with the general public the doubts we have raised over the last few years on the integrity of the voter registration that took place in 2012 and the way forward. We accepted the invitation and I am happy to say that this is my first public statement since my appointment by the governing board of the institute as its Executive Director on 1st September.
Nine privately-owned newspapers suspended publication today until further notice in protest against threats and harassment by officials who support Laurent Gbagbo. The move came two days after the main transmission centre of Radio-Télévision Ivoirienne (RTI), the state-owned broadcaster controlled by the Gbagbo camp, was attacked by supporters of Gbagbo’s rival Alassane Ouattara during clashes in the Abidjan district of Abobo. At the same time, a printing press employee of La Refondation, the company that publishes the daily Notre Voie, was beaten and hacked to death yesterday in the south Abidjan suburb of Koumassi. Notre Voie supports Gbagbo’s party, the Ivorian Popular Front (FPL).
Is IPAC losing its focus towards electoral transparency?
After the much anticipated need for electoral reforms in Ghana to stem the tide of voter fraud, it is beginning to look like the government has finally buckled to the wishes of common sense that the kind of voters register we have used since 1992 is redundant, retrogressive unwanted and to a large extent archaic. The wish of common sense would have been that we switched to biometric registration followed by e-voting. Somehow the government has agreed to fund the biometric registration but has curiously refused to fund the e-voting. Be that as it may the next step is to give the various political parties a clear road map to the implementation of the biometric registration.
Getting the state right : think tanks and the dissemination of New Public Management ideas in Ghana
Private research institutions, commonly referred to as think tanks, are a recent phenomenon in the Ghanaian policy environment. They are part of a growing number of NGOs that have emerged with Ghana’s political liberalisation and are attempting to influence policymaking. These institutions exert a greater influence on policies affecting the functioning of the ‘administrative state ’ than other NGOs. Through their efforts, ideas pertaining to administrative reform appear to have taken root strongly in Ghana. This paper examines the processes and methods that have been adopted by these institutions in developing policies that are being pursued to change the ‘ administrative state ’ in Ghana. It argues that the ability of these institutions to influence policies geared towards changing the administrative state can be attributed to the calibre of personnel as well as the processes and methods they have adopted. more >>>
Uganda ministers Bumba and Makubuya resign after probe
The committee said President Yoweri Museveni was not responsible for the compensation sum paid out Two cabinet ministers in Uganda at the centre of a corruption scandal have resigned. They agreed to step down after a parliamentary investigation found they had illegally paid out millions of dollars to a city businessman.
Is Ghana truly the beacon of hope for democracy in Africa?
Ghanaians went to the polls on Friday 7th and Saturday 8th December 2012 to elect an executive President and 275 Parliamentarians for a four year term January 2013 to December 2016. Less than 48 hours after the voting was closed, the caretaker President H.E. John Dramani Mahama of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) was declared a winner with 5,574,761 votes representing 50.70% of the valid votes cast (10,995,262) by the Chairman of the Electoral Commission (EC), Dr Afari Gyan. According to the EC, the flag bearer and presidential candidate of the NPP got 5,248,898 votes representing 47.74% of the total valid vote cast. The total turnout was 80.15% and the elections was held in 26.002 polling stations across the 10 Regions of the country. For some people in and outside Ghana, including this writer, the result was a big surprise. The Economist Newspaper of 15th December 2012 in a short article over the elections wrote that “Mr Mahama’s victory was surprising”. Reasons for the surprise are explained further in the article.
Outlawing Criminal Libel Laws in Ghana
I am honoured by the invitation to participate in this important colloquium on the twin themes of “African Constitutionalism: Present Challenges and Prospects for the Future” and “African Constitutionalism and the Media”, important, at least, for those of us who believe that entrenching the principles of democratic accountability, respect for human rights and the rule of law at the very centre of Africa’s body politic is critical to Africa’s chances of meaningful development in this 21st century. Decades of authoritarian rule across the continent in the post independence era not only subverted the promise of the independence movement that freedom would result in good governance, progress and prosperity, but also led to the systematic worsening of the already low living standards of the African people.
Kenya election: Tense wait for Kenyatta and Odinga
Uhuru Kenyatta retains a significant lead in Kenya's closely fought presidential election but it is not clear whether he will pass the 50% threshold to win outright. With 80% of constituencies declared, Mr Kenyatta has 49.9% of the vote, against 43.7% for Prime Minister Raila Odinga. After four days of anxious waiting, election chief James Oswago said the results would be finalised on Friday.
Verification and Validation Issues in Electronic Voting
Electronic democracy (e-democracy) is a necessity in this era of computers and information technology. Electronic election (e-election) is one of the most important applications of e-democracy, because of the importance of the voters’ privacy and the possibility of frauds. Electronic voting (e-voting) is the most significant part of e-election, which refers to the use of computers or computerised voting equipment to cast ballots in an election. Due to the rapid growth of computer technologies and advances in cryptographic techniques, e-voting is now an applicable alternative for many non-governmental elections. However, security demands become higher when voting takes place in the political arena. Click here for full report