For several weeks now, accusations have been flung back and forth between the election commission and the opposition about the voter register, a database of around 32 million voters that identifies those eligible to vote in the November elections. The stakes are potentially huge, as if the register is rigged, it will be difficult for observers at the polling stations to identify fraud.

The report is a confidential document written in early August by Zetes, a Belgian company contracted by the Congolese government to issue biometric voters cards.

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Unemployment is the world's fastest-rising worry, a BBC World Service survey covering 11,000 people in 23 countries suggests. The annual poll, called The World Speaks, gave people a list of concerns and asked which they had discussed with friends or family in the past month.

Corruption and poverty still ranked the highest, but unemployment was mentioned by 18% - six times the rate citing it in the first survey in 2009.

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The most talked about global issue in Ghana is unemployment, mentioned three times more frequently by Ghanaians than the global average (49% vs 16%). Corruption is the second most discussed issue (42%, twice as many as the global average) and is also the most serious global problem, rated as veryserious by 77 per cent of respondents. Extreme poverty (65%) and the spread of human diseases (58%) are ranked second and third respectively, and are rated comparably with the global averages (69% and 55%, respectively).

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With almost 90 percent of polling places reporting, Congolese President Joseph Kabila appears to have won another five years in office with nearly half the vote. But the country will not know officially until Thursday due to a 48 hour delay in the release of final results.

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DI laments Government decision to stop Ghana’s multi-billion off-shore banking
The Danquah Institute has described as “very unfortunate” and “loss of a multi-billion dollar opportunity”, the decision by the Mills administration to discontinue with the arrangement by the previous government to make Ghana an offshore banking centre. Nana Attobrah, Head of Research, DI, made this known when he addressed the press Wednesday on the growing multi-million dollar trade in illegal international transfer of money to Ghana.
China in Africa: Beware the dragon bearing gifts
While China is investing billions in Africa, it is also busily extracting its precious natural resources. Many are now questioning if the east's involvement in Africa will be any more beneficial than the west's has been. It'is a sweltering October afternoon 20 kilometres to the west of the booming mining town of Karonga in northern Malawi. The sun is beating down on vast swathes of dusty, arid land, parched by months without rain. Teams of Chinese labourers from the China Road and Bridge Corporation are working on a large construction project to build a road from Karonga to the remote town of Chitipa.
Global Economic Positioning
As Ken Ofori-Atta of Databank stated at Chatham House recently, “We have not seen such massive destruction of wealth in the history of modern civilisation and I might add also such rapid recreation of capital in the past year. Africa is truly astounded at how quickly the West can mobilise to save their companies when a fraction of those amounts could reinstate the impressive growth trajectory which Africa had achieved.”
John Mahama defends all-die-be-die in his book and yet condemns Akufo-Addo
In his book, ‘My First Coup D’etat’, President John Dramani Mahama concludes in the last paragraph, “All the decisions I have made in my life were regularly plagued with doubt. It can be challenging to sustain that feeling of hope or the belief that things will turn out for the best. Again and again, I have felt like that boy Dramani, on the bicycle going downhill fast, without any brakes and not knowing which way to turn.” He speaks of his father, a man of royal lineage, a former minister of state and a well-to-do capitalist, having six cars, the best house and providing for all of young Dramani’s needs, including cash to go to the disco.
Transcript  of Yaw Boateng Gyan’s Tape
“When I return, I hope the work that I expect you to do, is done. I intend to get a pick up vehicle. Kwasi says he has to travel to Sunyani for his brother’s engagement and a funeral and so he’s gone. I’ll get a white land cruiser and a pick-up. If you work together, it’s fine. If you work individually, it’s fine. Then, you go and gather information, as many information as possible and when you go, coach the regional organizers.
View from AfricaBy Daniel Howden, Africa CorrespondentSaturday, 2 October 2010 To the casual visitor, the most obvious sign of China in Africa is also the most fleeting indication of the country's deepening engagement with the continent: On the road into Nairobi you pass a green and red arch commemorating Beijing's friendship with Kenya. Clones of this giant Chinese character lie in wait outside a host of other African airports. But the reality of China's surge towards becoming the continent's largest trading partner is borne out by what lies beneath your vehicle: the road was built by a Chinese contractor. If the African experience is anything to go by, China's move to strengthen its investment in Brazil is unlikely to be its last. The Centre for Chinese Studies at Stellenbosch University in South Africa issues a weekly update on Sino-African commerce and development. The bulletins reveal a transformative geopolitical phenomenon. This week's highlight was the US$15bn (£9.5bn) contracts signed between Ghana and China for infrastructure projects and loans for oil and gas development. Ghana's President, John Atta Mills, eschewed a high-profile global summit in New York on the future of aid to spend six days in Beijing sealing the largest deal of its kind in his nation's history.
Petitioners Letters to KPMG; demands meeting with referee
The Petitioners in the ongoing Presidential Election Petition are demanding an urgent meeting with the referee appointed by the Supreme Court to audit pink sheet exhibits.The meeting, they insist it to rectify anomalies found after the audit by KPMG.The Referee was expected to complete the audit of the pink sheet exhibits by Friday June 21 and was to provide a final report to the court on Monday.
S&P affirms ratings on Republic of Ghana at 'B/B'
The Republic of Ghana benefits from strong GDP growth, strengthening oil production volumes, and a track record of political stability. However, it continues to suffer from weak fiscal management highlighted by a widening of the fiscal deficit in 2010 and increased supplier arrears. We are therefore affirming our 'B/B' foreign- and local-currency sovereign credit ratings on the Republic of Ghana. The stable outlook balances our view of the country's strong growth prospects and track record of political stability against its weak payment culture and fiscal challenges.
The Government of Ghana announced in its 2010 Budget and Policy Statement the plan to develop an Oil and Gas Industrialization Plan as a sustainable model of managing her petroleum resources. The oil and gas driven industrialization is expected to make Ghana’s oil a blessing. For this reason, the government plans to use oil and gas resources to boost the manufacturing and agricultural sectors, through economic diversification, create jobs and promote private sector development.The country’s current economic performance is mixed and characterised by low investments. The Global Competitiveness Report of 2008/9 ranked Ghana 102 out of 134 in global competitiveness, 127th in low productivity with poor infrastructure and human capital. This makesthe proposed Industrialization Plan more imperative.
Defending a negative highlights a negative, but character is key
In the 2008 general elections Nana Akufo-Addo had to do four things, two positive and the other two negative. On the positive side, he had to campaign on President Kufuor’s record to justify why the NPP had to be allowed to continue ‘moving Ghana forward.’ Also, he had to tell Ghanaians what his message for the future was -- what he intended to do if given power. Here he had to be careful and avoid charges like why the NPP did not do what he is promising to do in the nearly eight years that it had been in power.