The attention of the Danquah Institute has been drawn to a story making the rounds on social media and now on www.ghanaweb.com, as well, titled “Danquah Institute predicts 64.7% win for Kwabena Agyepong.”

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Mick MooreTaxation is zipping up the development agenda, but the discussion is often focussed on international aspects such as tax havens or the Robin Hood Tax. Both very important, but arguably, even more important is what happens domestically – are developing country tax systems regressive or progressive? Are they raising enough cash to fund state services? Are they efficient and free of corruption? This absolutely magisterial overview of the state of tax systems in Africa comes from Mick Moore (right), who runs the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD). It was first published by the Africa Research Institute.

Anglophone countries have led the way in reforming tax administration in Africa, considerably more so than their francophone peers. The reasons for this are numerous. Networks of international tax specialists are based mainly in English-speaking countries. Many of the modern systems that promote best practice within tax authorities were developed in anglophone countries, especially Australia. International donors, and particularly the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), have directly and indirectly promoted a lot of reform of national tax authorities. In fact, this has been one of the success stories of British aid.

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You are welcome to this Press briefing. The Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) held its 58th meeting on November 25 to 27, 2013 to review the latest economic developments and the monetary policy stance. I present to you the outcome of the deliberations.

The latest projections by the IMF indicate a pickup in the pace of global activity from 2.9 percent in 2013 to 3.6 percent in 2014, driven largely by the advanced economies with the impulse to global growth expected to come mainly from the United States against weaker prospects in emerging market economies.

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As the 20th anniversary of the birth of democracy in South Africa, on April 27 2014, approaches, it seems a perfect opportunity to take a step back and get a long-range perspective on the important question: “So, what has Nelson Mandela’s South Africa done with its freedom?”

Goldman Sachs has produced this report in the hope of contributing to- wards a more balanced narrative on South Africa; one, which in the wake of 2012’s tragic events at Marikana, had become somewhat hysterical, short-term and often negative

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Why Martin A. B. K. Amidu is not using government or party channels for his advocacy for accountability and transparency
The purpose of this statement following immediately after my opinion of 28th May 2012 stating that the President’s executive judgment in the matter of the Supreme Court decision in the case of Okudzeto Ablakwa and Omane-Boamah against the Attorney-General (Jake Obetsebi-Lampety voluntarily applied and was joined as additional Defendant) is to answer the accusations and spins on why I am not directing my criticisms in-house to the Government or the NDC. The Government spin since I left office has been that I am a disgruntled smokescreen being used by the NPP against the Government.
Amending The Constitution Of Ghana: Is The Imperial President Trespassing?
In January 2010, Ghana‘s President John Atta Mills appointed a commission to review and propose amendments to the country‘s current constitution, in force since 1993.1 The ―constitutional instrument establishing the commission tasked the nine-member body2 to ―ascertain from the people of Ghana, their views on the operation of the constitution, and in particular its strength and weaknesses, articulate the concerns of the people on amendments that might be required for a comprehensive review and make recommendations to government for consideration. A Ministry of Justice document setting forth the administration‘s agenda for constitutional reform identifies about forty specific provisions and omissions in the constitution as likely candidates for review and amendment, and the commission is directed to consider these pre-identified issues in its review. By its terms of reference, the commission‘s final work product must include ―a draft Bill for possible amendments to the constitution. more >>>
Flagbearer of the National Democratic Party (NDP), Nana Konadu Agyeman Rawlings has described the free SHS policy being touted by the NPP as “not impossible,” citing the Constitution and explaining it as a right and a duty of all parties and government. This is in sharp contrast with the position held by the party her husband founded, which has rubbished Nana Akufo-Addo’s pledge to extend basic education to the Senior High School level and make it free.
In a carefully drafted memorandum to the Minister of Water Resources, Works & Housing, stakeholders of Ghana's built environment have raised serious questions about the proposed $10 billion joint venture agreement between STX Korea and the Government of Ghana for the construction of 200,000 housing units between 2010 and 2015. In their memo dated June 9, 2010, the Joint Committee of the Ghana Institute of Architects, Ghana Institute of Planners, Ghana Institution of Engineers and Ghana Institution of Surveyors welcomed the bold project but added that Ghanaians don't need Koreans to come and build affordable homes for Ghana.
“….What do we have now? A thieving political and business elite who have not raised a dime of their own capital conniving with our civil and public servants to steal Ghana’s scarce resources under all sorts of rotten deals.….” I am constrained to cite these concluding lines from my tribute to B.A. Mensah because quite a few people, including two anxious Professors from the UDS I met at the funeral of the academic and (not-greedy) asute businessman and friend, Sam Aboah at Adukrom urged me to write an article premised on these lines. That paragraph forms the basis of this attempt to discuss the insidious matter of unashamed and barefaced thievery going on in Ghana.
Akufo-Addo jabs Mahama over unemployment
The flagbearer of the New Patriotic Party says the government’s record on job creation over the last four years is not the least but impressive. Nana Akufo-Addo said the president and his team of ministers by announcing phantom jobs only add insult to injury of the many unemployed youth who are desperately looking for jobs.
EC to start biometric registration before end of year – Afari-Gyan
Dr Kwadwo Afari-Gyan, Chairman of the Electoral Commission (EC), on Wednesday announced that the commission would commence biometric voter registration before the end of this year. He, however, dismissed speculations that the EC would use the electronic voting process for Election 2012. Dr Afari-Gyan was speaking on the third day of a public lecture, organized by the Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences with support from the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, in Accra.
The Head of IT at the Electoral Commissioner, Mr. Peter Akumiah, has emphatically stated that Ghana will employ the use of a Biometric Voter Register for the 2012 elections. This statement was made in a response to a question put to the head of IT at the Electoral Commission by Mr. Gabby Otchere-Darko, Executive Director of the Danquah Institute at a conference organised by the Institute to interrogate issues pertaining to the introduction of a Biometric Voter Registration and Electronic Voting in Ghana. Mr. Akumiah said a biometric voter register would be implemented for the 2012 elections and could be completed in about a year’s time “if all things work out well,” he said.
Abu Ramadan files application for review in Mornah case
Take Notice that Counsel for and on behalf of the Applicant herein will move this Honourable Court on an application for review of the decision of the court, Coram: Ansah JSC (Presiding), Adinyira (Mrs.), Owusu (Ms.), Anin-Yeboah, Gbadegbe, Akoto-Bamfo (Mrs.) and Benin JJSC, dated 30th April 2013 upon the grounds contained in the accompanying affidavit and for any further order(s) as this Court may deem meet. Click here for full document
Al-Qaida’s Appeal:  Understanding its Unique Selling Points
Despite its seemingly extreme ideology and its even more extreme use of political violence, al-Qaida has been able to elicit sympathy and support from a surprisingly large number of people. Suspected al-Qaida members have been arrested in dozens of countries around the world, and opinion polls in both Western and Middle Eastern countries have shown that relatively large numbers of young Muslims express sympathy with al-Qaida. In other words, we have a situation in which al-Qaida has killed civilians on a massive scale, including a large number of Muslims, but still seems to enjoy relatively widespread support. How can we explain this apparent conundrum? This article argues that al-Qaida's continuing appeal is a result of three key factors. First, al-Qaida propagates a simple popular message, which resonates strongly with deeply held grievances in the Muslim world. The organisation strives to follow the popular mood in many respects. Second, al-Qaida has created for itself a powerful and captivating image.