“….What do we have now? A thieving political and business elite who have not raised a dime of their own capital conniving with our civil and public servants to steal Ghana’s scarce resources under all sorts of rotten deals.….”

I am constrained to cite these concluding lines from my tribute to B.A. Mensah because quite a few people, including two anxious Professors from the UDS I met at the funeral of the academic and (not-greedy) asute businessman and friend, Sam Aboah at Adukrom urged me to write an article premised on these lines. That paragraph forms the basis of this attempt to discuss the insidious matter of unashamed and barefaced thievery going on in Ghana.

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The Board of Governors of the Danquah Institute have appointed Mustapha Abdul Hamid as acting Executive Director of the Danquah Institute, the Accra-based policy and governance think tank.

Mustapha Hamid takes over from Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko who is leaving the country to undertake research work abroad.

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Ampaw And FrimpongA founding Dean at the Faculty of Law, Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA), Prof Kwame Frimpong says the judgement delivered by the nine Supreme Court justices in the just-concluded Presidential Election Petition has taken Ghana back to the Stone Age.

“Unfortunately this case has set us so many years back maybe even to the Stone Age,” he said at a symposium organized by Danquah Institute (DI), a policy analysis group to review the Supreme Court’s verdict of August 29 in the landmark presidential election petition.

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WASHINGTON—Friends, former colleagues, and family members gathered on Thursday to remember Howard Wolpe, who as a diplomat, lawmaker, and director of The Wilson Center's Africa Program worked tirelessly for peace in Africa, from helping to bring democratic majority rule to South Africa to conflict-prone regions like the Great Lakes.

“Howard was a champion of all the right causes,” said Susan Rice, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, in a ceremony that included addresses from the Hon. Donald Payne (D-NJ), as well as former Representatives the Hon. David Bonior (D-MI) and the Hon. William H. Gray III (D-PA). Also participating in the service at the Ronald Reagan Building was Ambassador Faida Mitifu, from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Dean of the African diplomatic corps, Jim Margolis and Steve Weissman, former staffers of Wolpe, and Jane Harman, President of the Wilson Center. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) paid tribute via video, as did Rep. John Dingell (D-MI). Wolpe died in October 2011. Present at the celebration of Wolpe’s life were a large number of Senators and Representatives, active and former, and several other African ambassadors and embassy representatives.

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Other Stories

OIL DEAL FROM EQUATORIAL GUINEA: IS IT 65,000 BARRELS A DAY OR 5,500?
In the last five months alone, President J E A Mills has made two 3-day official trips to Equatorial Guinea and has on both occasions returned to Ghana with news of striking significantly different crude oil deals with his Equatorial Guinean counterpart, President Theodore Nguema Mbasogo. The Danquah Institute is also extremely disturbed by moves by the Government of Ghana to rescue a Korean company that is US$6.3 billion in debt, whilst thousands of Ghanaian companies are also in distress and would require only a fraction of that amount to stimulate them back into productivity and profitability. more >>>
I don’t believe I am the only one who has noticed the indifference and conspicuous silence of the media on the poor quality telecom services in this country; the silence of the media is so deafening it is not funny anymore. It is about time the media stopped describing us as listeners, viewers and readers; and it is time the telecom companies stopped describing us as subscribers or customers. We are citizens; human beings, whose rights are being blatantly violated, through the indecent flirtation between the media and the telecom operators. The radio stations in particular, are very loud about problems with the other utility services; water and electricity. But they say very little about the daily problems we face trying to make calls on our mobile phones; and it is not as if people do not complain about the problems they face – the call drops, speech mutation, calls not going through, network congestion, wrong voice prompts, no coverage and all the others. There is also the dysfunctional broadband and snail-pace wireless internet services. Due to the age-old network challenges, we lose money directly and indirectly everyday, and sometimes we even lose valuable business and social relationships. The telecom operators make a boast of the ‘supersonic speed’ of their wireless dongles, but our reality is that these dongles are so slow and they suck credit so fast. As for broadband, the least said about it the better.
No Ambiguity in NPP Constitution On Election Of Flagbearer
Some highly respected members of the New Patriotic Party have been arguing that the national leadership of the party, in choosing a date for the election of the 2012 presidential candidate of the party, must stick to the letter of the party’s constitution. This is a responsible statement, ordinarily. However, their interpretation of the constitution is that the flagbearer must be chosen in (rather than by) December 2010. Some also argue, with some ostensible generosity, that the National Congress to elect the presidential candidate can be done ‘earlier’ but certainly not earlier than September 2010 because of the time the constitution provides for nominations to be filed. The fundamental canon of interpretation is that where the words of a statute have a plain and straightforward meaning and the words are reasonably capable of only one meaning that one literal meaning must be given. Thus, if a constitution’s language is plain and clear, the duty of interpretation does not arise, and the rules which are to aid doubtful meanings need no discussion.
The Electoral Commission has said it is embarking on a nationwide kit swapping exercise for areas that reported faulty equipment in the ongoing biometric voter registration exercise. There have been several reports of faulty computers, cameras and batteries across the country since the exercise began on Saturday.
May 2012 Synovate Opinion Poll
The following sampling procedure were applied using a fully structured face-to-face questionnaire at household level. The target population covered by our Omnibus survey May 2012 is the general public aged 18 years and above living in Ghana. Each of the 10 regions’ sample was proportionate to its population. Urban/Rural split was 50:50 reflecting the national split as well as gender for Male/Female 49:51 respectively as existed in the sampling frame. Hence our sample is nationally representative and is self-weighting. Click here for details of poll
GREDA: STOP $10BN STX HOUSING DEAL, WE CAN DO IT CHEAPER
The Ghana Real Estate Developers Association, GREDA has joined calls for parliament to reject the government’s agreement with a Korean company, STX for the construction of 200,000 housing units at the cost of $10 billion because it does not represent value for money and not in the nation's interest. GREDA says although the plan to reduce the housing deficit through the project is commendable, local contractors can execute the project at less than half the cost quoted by the Korean firm if given the same incentives and exemptions government is keen on granting STX.
NDC can't buy conscience of Ghanaians - Kufuor
Former President J.A. Kufuor has accused the National Democratic Congress (NDC) of resorting to vote buying ahead of the December 7 elections and warned the party that the conscience of the Ghanaian people is not for sale. Speaking to a large number of New Patriotic Party (NPP) supporters and leading members who had braved hours of heavy downpour in Kumasi to attend a rally, Mr. Kufuor said that Ghanaians are wide awake and discerning and that they will vote the NDC out, especially because the vote buying money came from the state.
DI: Accurate statistics is the base for planning
The Danquah Institute welcomes the debate that has been generated by the “State of our Economy” lecture delivered by the 2012 vice Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party (NPP), Dr Mahamudu Bawumia. Our disappointment, however, is over an attempt to have the debate hijacked by the culture of personal attacks and a diversionary shadow boxing between the Ghana Statistical Service and the main opposition party, the NPP.
Insight: Top palm oil producer Indonesia wants to be more refined
For decades, Indonesia has shipped out tanker loads of raw palm oil for processing into higher value cooking oil and margarine in Rotterdam, Mumbai and Kuala Lumpur. Now, the world's No. 1 producer of the edible oil is seeing a more than $2.5 billion wave of investment to build a refining industry that will double its capacity and mean it could supply the entire needs of Asia's top food consumers - India and China. The transformation - driven by Indonesia's move to slash export duties for processed oil last October - will heat up competition with rivals such as Malaysia and send ripples through the palm oil market as new supply pressures prices of traded refined products such as palmolein, used as cooking oil.
CNN) -- The recent history of the U.S. nuclear industry suggests that nuclear power can be a safe source of low-carbon electricity. But disasters can happen very quickly, with potentially cataclysmic results. The loss of coolant, explosions and apparent partial meltdown of nuclear plants in Japan following the earthquake and tsunami remind us that nuclear power is inherently risky. The U.S. government and the nuclear industry must take new actions to ensure that nuclear power is safe for the American public. New nuclear reactors are phenomenally expensive, costing up to $10 billion dollars apiece. Exelon CEO John Rowe said recently that the combination of low natural gas prices and failure of Congress to put a price on carbon dioxide pollution pushes back any significant nuclear renaissance by a "decade, maybe two."