The attention of the Danquah Institute has been drawn to a story making the rounds on social media and now on www.ghanaweb.com, as well, titled “Danquah Institute predicts 64.7% win for Kwabena Agyepong.”

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Mick MooreTaxation is zipping up the development agenda, but the discussion is often focussed on international aspects such as tax havens or the Robin Hood Tax. Both very important, but arguably, even more important is what happens domestically – are developing country tax systems regressive or progressive? Are they raising enough cash to fund state services? Are they efficient and free of corruption? This absolutely magisterial overview of the state of tax systems in Africa comes from Mick Moore (right), who runs the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD). It was first published by the Africa Research Institute.

Anglophone countries have led the way in reforming tax administration in Africa, considerably more so than their francophone peers. The reasons for this are numerous. Networks of international tax specialists are based mainly in English-speaking countries. Many of the modern systems that promote best practice within tax authorities were developed in anglophone countries, especially Australia. International donors, and particularly the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), have directly and indirectly promoted a lot of reform of national tax authorities. In fact, this has been one of the success stories of British aid.

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You are welcome to this Press briefing. The Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) held its 58th meeting on November 25 to 27, 2013 to review the latest economic developments and the monetary policy stance. I present to you the outcome of the deliberations.

The latest projections by the IMF indicate a pickup in the pace of global activity from 2.9 percent in 2013 to 3.6 percent in 2014, driven largely by the advanced economies with the impulse to global growth expected to come mainly from the United States against weaker prospects in emerging market economies.

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As the 20th anniversary of the birth of democracy in South Africa, on April 27 2014, approaches, it seems a perfect opportunity to take a step back and get a long-range perspective on the important question: “So, what has Nelson Mandela’s South Africa done with its freedom?”

Goldman Sachs has produced this report in the hope of contributing to- wards a more balanced narrative on South Africa; one, which in the wake of 2012’s tragic events at Marikana, had become somewhat hysterical, short-term and often negative

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Other Stories

Why the west should rule out military action against Iran
With tough new sanctions in place, further measures threatened by Iran, naval forces mustering in the Persian Gulf, and state-sponsored terrorism ongoing, we are on the brink of a military conflict. Israel, at this very moment, is contemplating whether to undertake a strike. This would be calamitous, and could lead to regional war. What is desperately needed is a fresh assessment of the situation. The west's approach of sanctions and sabre-rattling are yesterday's failed policies. The fact we are once again on the cusp of conflict is testament to that failure.
Government and NPA must obey court order
We have taken note of Government’s statement on the abolishing of illegal fuel price margins by the High Court. The statement is most unfortunate. In particular, the argument by Government that the removal of the illegal price top-ups will lead to higher fuel prices is deceitful. For the benefit of the public, we quote the petroleum pricing formula made pursuant to the National Petroleum Authority Act, 2005 (Act 691): more>>
Biometric Voter Registration - Road Map
ELECTORAL COMMISSION, ROAD MAP FOR BIOMETRIC VOTER REGISTRATION. Please find below listing of major activities of the biometric voter registration project segmented into quarterly timeframes, using 3rd quarter as reference point. more>>>
GHANA BEYOND THE SUPREME COURT
What will happen when the Supreme Court rules in the election dispute? Will there be peace or violence? That we were a divided country before December 7th is clear to all—after all, this is the second election in a row that the winner has failed to win 51% of the votes. Unfortunately, the court case following the election has only worsened the divisions and tensions. Of course, it can be argued that if the petitioners had chosen the streets instead of the courts, our plight would be worse. This case, regardless of the outcome, has already undermined quite a few reputations and national assumptions:
IMANI Special Report on the STX-Ghana Deal
Introduction Since the STX-Ghana deal took its sour turn towards controversy, many people have asked us, usually privately, what a pro-market organisation such as ours is doing “opposing” a business deal that seems to benefit the private sector more than the public sector. Quite apart from the fact that such a question betrays a woeful lack of understanding of the “free market” it is also unfair to our actual position on the STX-Ghana matter.
Africa Human Development Report 2012 - Towards a Food Secure Future
Africa has seen an extraordinary rebound in economic growth over the past decade. Some of the world’s fastest growing economies are in Africa, and they have expanded even during the ongoing uncertainty in the global economy. This has brought a much-needed reduction in poverty in the region and a renewed sense of optimism about its future. There is no doubt that economic growth is critical for human development, and it is imperative that growth be sustained. Click here for full report
Nov. 5 (Bloomberg) -- Ghana’s economy is 75 percent bigger than previously calculated, the country’s Statistical Service said, slashing the relative size of the fiscal deficit and the current account shortfall. The West African nation’s gross domestic product this year is 44.8 billion cedis ($31.2 billion), compared with the previous estimate of 25.6 billion cedis, Grace Bediako, head of the Accra-based agency, told reporters today.
The Danquah Institute has predicted that Government is "very likely" to miss its revised end-of-year inflation target of 14.5%, despite projections by the highly reputable Centre for Policy Analysis (CEPA) that inflation could fall to 14.2% by the end of December. The institute also fears that World Bank prediction that another 500,000 Ghanaians would fall below the poverty line by 2010 “may be alarmingly conservative, considering subsequent unimpressive economic indicators since that prediction was made in June.”
A victory for Fraud?
Unlike Nana Akufo-Addo, I am not the least bit disappointed that our Supreme Court would affirm the fraudulent declaration of Mr. John Dramani Mahama as winner of the 2012 election. (See "Akufo-Addo: 'I Disagree with SC's Verdict but I Accept'" Ghanaweb.com 8/29/13).I am not disappointed because I am also not the least bit surprised. For going into the Election 2012 Petition, I emphatically stated that unless the panel of jurists adjudicating the petition were drawn from outside Ghana, I did not see much by way of a favorable ruling for those with the most forensically sustainable evidence. And so in quite a practical sense, I have been vindicated in my prediction.
U.S. Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, gave a prophetic advice to Middle East leaders gathered in Qatar for the Forum of the Future on January 12 that their regimes should adapt or die. Reform or deform. A few days later, Ben Ali fell and, and scents from the Jasmine Revolution filling the air ofEgypt, with Hosni Mubarak, misreading the mood and sacking his government and promising to step down at a future date when the demand of the masses are simply: ‘go and go now!’. What is happening in the two Arab nations has been compared to the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovokia in 1989 and its domino effect in shredding to pieces the iron curtain, which led to the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe and the subsequent dominance of multiparty democracy in bothEurope and Africa.