The attention of the Danquah Institute has been drawn to a story making the rounds on social media and now on www.ghanaweb.com, as well, titled “Danquah Institute predicts 64.7% win for Kwabena Agyepong.”

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Mick MooreTaxation is zipping up the development agenda, but the discussion is often focussed on international aspects such as tax havens or the Robin Hood Tax. Both very important, but arguably, even more important is what happens domestically – are developing country tax systems regressive or progressive? Are they raising enough cash to fund state services? Are they efficient and free of corruption? This absolutely magisterial overview of the state of tax systems in Africa comes from Mick Moore (right), who runs the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD). It was first published by the Africa Research Institute.

Anglophone countries have led the way in reforming tax administration in Africa, considerably more so than their francophone peers. The reasons for this are numerous. Networks of international tax specialists are based mainly in English-speaking countries. Many of the modern systems that promote best practice within tax authorities were developed in anglophone countries, especially Australia. International donors, and particularly the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), have directly and indirectly promoted a lot of reform of national tax authorities. In fact, this has been one of the success stories of British aid.

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You are welcome to this Press briefing. The Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) held its 58th meeting on November 25 to 27, 2013 to review the latest economic developments and the monetary policy stance. I present to you the outcome of the deliberations.

The latest projections by the IMF indicate a pickup in the pace of global activity from 2.9 percent in 2013 to 3.6 percent in 2014, driven largely by the advanced economies with the impulse to global growth expected to come mainly from the United States against weaker prospects in emerging market economies.

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As the 20th anniversary of the birth of democracy in South Africa, on April 27 2014, approaches, it seems a perfect opportunity to take a step back and get a long-range perspective on the important question: “So, what has Nelson Mandela’s South Africa done with its freedom?”

Goldman Sachs has produced this report in the hope of contributing to- wards a more balanced narrative on South Africa; one, which in the wake of 2012’s tragic events at Marikana, had become somewhat hysterical, short-term and often negative

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Responses To The 2013 Budget Statement
This budget statement came at a time when Ghanaians are in darkness, when water shortages are widespread, where unemployment is rife, and where general cost of living is rising. The budget statement should have addressed these challenges head on, but it didn’t. Ghana’s total debt is up from GHC9.5 billion in January 2009 to GHC33.5 billion now. Additionally, the NDC government has crude oil proceeds which its predecessor governments did not have. Additionally again, the NDC government has been getting windfall benefit from the exports of gold, cocoa and crude oil because of the near-record high levels. But what do we have to show for it all?
Budget swerves health workers on Single Spine
Yesterday, the Minister of Finance and Economic Planning, Kwabena Duffuor, read his Mid Year Review of the Budget Statement and Economic Policy when he presented his Supplementary Budget for the year. Out of the GH¢1.46 billion additional spending he presented to Parliament for approval, only GH¢177.6 was for salaries and wages, increasing the pay budget for 2011 to GH¢3.91bn. However, this is bad news for a high number of public sector workers because it does not even take care of existing salary arrears, let alone take care of the migration of one of the largest public sector employees, health workers.
Fmr. President Kufuor to address 2nd Liberty Lecture
The Danquah Institute is pleased to invite members of the general public to the 2nd Liberty Lecture. The lecture is on the theme: “Development in Freedom: Empowering the People to Develop the Nation” and will be delivered by Mr. John Agyekum Kufuor, former president of the Republic of Ghana. The lecture will be chaired by Madam Ama Busia.
EC lauds registration exercise
The Electoral Commission (EC) says it is impressed with the level of patronage in the just ended voters registration exercise. According to the Public Relations Officer of the commission, Christian Owusu-Parry, the exercise went on well, having assessed its successes since Sunday.
It would be correct to say that a number of the policies and actions of democratic governments in the world often run counter to the wishes and desires of a great majority of the people in the nation. This is because those policies and actions are adopted by the government and some lawmakers that comprise a relatively few people, thus exclusive of the inputs, preferences, and wishes of a large majority of the people. It is not enough, surely, for the people to be included—and to participate--only in the periodic election of those who are to govern and to make laws for the state. The consequences of the exclusion of large segments of the population from the decisions of the government that affect the lives of the people have been public demonstrations to protest government policy and action and to indicate the preferences of the people. Political conflict, violence, rancor, and misunderstanding have also resulted from the exclusion of the people from decisions and choices of their government.
The modern state of Ghana was formed in 1957 from several territorial units administered under British colonial authority. These included the Gold Coast Colony, the traditional state of Ashanti, the Northern Territories Protectorate, and the Trust Territory of British Togo land. Early nationalist movements were active primarily within the Gold Coast Colony, which had achieved some measure of indigenous participation in governmental organs by 1946. Prominent in the movement for self-government was J.B. Danquah, instrumental in the founding of the United Gold Coast Convention (UGCC) in 1946 and Kwame Nkrumah, who formed the Convention People's Party (CPP) two years later.
Study into Election Statistics provided by Counsel Philip Addison during his Oral Address
On the 7th of August 2013, counsel for the petitioners Mr. Philip Addison brought forth some statistics about the 2012 General Elections. The quote, as published on the website of the Daily Guide newspaper is as follows: “The 1st Petitioner obtained a total of 5,248,898 votes as against a total of 5,248,882 by all NPP Parliamentary candidates, showing a difference of 16. However the first Respondent (Mahama) obtained a total of 5,574,761 as against 5,127,641 by all NDC parliamentarians, showing a whopping difference of 447,120. Download full document here
View from AfricaBy Daniel Howden, Africa CorrespondentSaturday, 2 October 2010 To the casual visitor, the most obvious sign of China in Africa is also the most fleeting indication of the country's deepening engagement with the continent: On the road into Nairobi you pass a green and red arch commemorating Beijing's friendship with Kenya. Clones of this giant Chinese character lie in wait outside a host of other African airports. But the reality of China's surge towards becoming the continent's largest trading partner is borne out by what lies beneath your vehicle: the road was built by a Chinese contractor. If the African experience is anything to go by, China's move to strengthen its investment in Brazil is unlikely to be its last. The Centre for Chinese Studies at Stellenbosch University in South Africa issues a weekly update on Sino-African commerce and development. The bulletins reveal a transformative geopolitical phenomenon. This week's highlight was the US$15bn (£9.5bn) contracts signed between Ghana and China for infrastructure projects and loans for oil and gas development. Ghana's President, John Atta Mills, eschewed a high-profile global summit in New York on the future of aid to spend six days in Beijing sealing the largest deal of its kind in his nation's history.
The Relevance of the Monetary Policy Rate in the Monetary Transmission Mechanism
In May 2007 the Bank of Ghana formally adopted inflation targeting (IT) as the framework for stabilizing prices within the economy. Since then, significant progress has been made in developing the policy framework as well as the institutions and markets that underpin its implementation – money and capital markets have been developed, there is a framework for forecasting liquidity, and a broad range of instruments with which to conduct monetary policy is available Click here for full report
GHANA BEYOND THE SUPREME COURT
What will happen when the Supreme Court rules in the election dispute? Will there be peace or violence? That we were a divided country before December 7th is clear to all—after all, this is the second election in a row that the winner has failed to win 51% of the votes. Unfortunately, the court case following the election has only worsened the divisions and tensions. Of course, it can be argued that if the petitioners had chosen the streets instead of the courts, our plight would be worse. This case, regardless of the outcome, has already undermined quite a few reputations and national assumptions: