General Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu died last weekend. His death brings to a certain climax the drama of a true, modern Nigerian epic. Olusegun Obasanjo was right this time in describing Ojukwu’s death as “the end of an era.”

At the passing of Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu described Zik as “the Alpha and the Omega of modern Nigeria,” just as he characterised Obafemi Awolowo as “the best President Nigeria never had,” thus melding paradox with hyperbole in an equal alchemy of mystery.


Madam Speaker, thank you for this opportunity to contribute to the motion on the Budget Statement for 2012. The budget is the most important document that governments produce. It is a powerful tool in influencing economic and social development. The budget determines whether there is equitable access to services by different groups of the population such as women, children, the disabled, the poor and other minority groups. more>>

Before I walked into the conference room of The Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) that afternoon, I knew very little about the biometric system and its implications for Ghana’s 2012 elections. And though I learnt a lot that day, I am still not one of the self-proclaimed experts of the biometric voter registration system who shout themselves coarse everyday on our airwaves.


Elections are around the corner in both America and Ghana and the airwaves are filled with spin. In the United States, former pizza mogul Herman Cain’s campaign is over due to accusations relating to womanizing and harassment.

Here in Ghana, every few days, there are accusations about the moral failings of one candidate or another. There are charges of womanizing, homosexuality, drug use and lack of smarts.


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“Those who wish to govern must subject themselves to probing questions by the people to ensure that they understand their concerns and have the capacity to address them,” IEA.As part of The Institute of Economic Affair’s (IEA) efforts to consolidate multiparty democracy and promote issue based elections in Ghana, The IEA is pleased to announce the First President Debate for the 2012 Presidential Debates Series.
EIU: Election watch July 2015
There is little time for Mr Mahama and the NDC to turn the economy around before the December 2016 presidential and legislative elections.
It features Nana Akufo-Addo, John Atta Mills, Jerry Rawlings, John Kufuor, Afari-Gyan, Kwesi Pratt, Hannah Tetteh, Rojo Mettle-Nunoo and Kwabena Agyepong, among others, and it has received great reviews across the globe, with the Los Angeles Times describing the documentary feature film as “the gripping examination of Ghana's 2008 presidential contest on display.” It is a movie, which is likely to reignite the kind of sensation that gripped the nation after the cable releases from Wikileaks.
The Danquah Institute has predicted that Government is "very likely" to miss its revised end-of-year inflation target of 14.5%, despite projections by the highly reputable Centre for Policy Analysis (CEPA) that inflation could fall to 14.2% by the end of December. The institute also fears that World Bank prediction that another 500,000 Ghanaians would fall below the poverty line by 2010 “may be alarmingly conservative, considering subsequent unimpressive economic indicators since that prediction was made in June.”
The Danquah Institute, an Accra-based policy think tank, has called on the collective leadership of the Economic Community of West African States and the African Union to actively show, with urgency, leadership and concern in the Federal Republic of Nigeria. “Such a priority engagement could boost ongoing domestic efforts at finding a democratic solution to the pending constitutional crisis in the biggest black nation in the world,” the think tank argues, adding that the situation is threatening Nigeria’s democracy and the stability of the region. After a longer history of instability, coups, military dictatorship and controversial elections, Africa’s most populous nation is struggling to contain the ramifications of a seriously ill, and absent, president.
“Ghana obtained independence from British colonial rule in 1957, the first African country, south of the Sahara, to do so. The country was full of promise and expectations of Ghanaians were high. In the words of Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, the first President, Ghana wanted to show the world that the black man can handle his own affairs. Some 53 years later, the optimism has somewhat waned and harsh reality has set in with the wide chasm between what is Ghana today and what could have been.” The above serves as the curtain opener to ‘Monetary Policy and Financial Sector Reform in Africa: Ghana’s Experience,’ written by Dr Mahamudu Bawumia. The book is a comprehensive, objective, concise history of Ghana since 1957, written by an Economist, to be precise a liberal economist, cast in the developmentalist mould of a Ghanaian nationalist. But, the book is not only a historical work, stretching from 1957 to 2008. More importantly, it provides information and models that are both historical and contemporary. It is detailed, easy to read, objectively factual and accurate. It is an excellent read for both set of persons who are new to economics and the others – Economics students, researchers, economists, bankers, politicians, and historians.
Akufo-Addo's proposal on NDPC lauded
Policy Analyst at Ashesi University, Lloyd Amoah, has lauded the proposal by Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party, to put his vice president in charge of the National Development Planning Commission, in the event of assuming the nation’s presidency on January 7, 2013. President John Dramani Mahama sought to make the nation believe that there was “confusion in the mind of” Nana Akufo-Addo when the NPP leader made the proposal at Tuesday’s presidential debate organised by the Institute of Economic Affairs at Tamale.
S&P affirms ratings on Republic of Ghana at 'B/B'
The Republic of Ghana benefits from strong GDP growth, strengthening oil production volumes, and a track record of political stability. However, it continues to suffer from weak fiscal management highlighted by a widening of the fiscal deficit in 2010 and increased supplier arrears. We are therefore affirming our 'B/B' foreign- and local-currency sovereign credit ratings on the Republic of Ghana. The stable outlook balances our view of the country's strong growth prospects and track record of political stability against its weak payment culture and fiscal challenges.
Court Observer: Tsatsu's Problem as I See it‏
Tsatsu Tsikata's cross-examination of Dr. Bawumia was much anticipated and billed as the "thrilla in Accra." Unfortunately, it has turned out to be the "trivia in Accra," with Tsatsu posing non-probative repetitive questions, which the crafty Dr. Bawumia has handled with ease and sometimes even with humor. Here are the 8 top reasons why Tsatsu has failed to make an impact thus far.
33% Ghanaians to vote based on employment
A survey conducted by the National Commission for Civic Education (NCCE) has revealed that 33 percent of Ghanaians say employment creation is the third most important issue they will consider before they vote. At a ceremony to outline the findings to the media, Mrs. Gertrude Zakaria-Ali Director of Reasearch at the NCCE said the research conducted in March this year, was to ascertain the issues of importance to voters in the run up to the December polls.