General Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu died last weekend. His death brings to a certain climax the drama of a true, modern Nigerian epic. Olusegun Obasanjo was right this time in describing Ojukwu’s death as “the end of an era.”

At the passing of Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu described Zik as “the Alpha and the Omega of modern Nigeria,” just as he characterised Obafemi Awolowo as “the best President Nigeria never had,” thus melding paradox with hyperbole in an equal alchemy of mystery.

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Madam Speaker, thank you for this opportunity to contribute to the motion on the Budget Statement for 2012. The budget is the most important document that governments produce. It is a powerful tool in influencing economic and social development. The budget determines whether there is equitable access to services by different groups of the population such as women, children, the disabled, the poor and other minority groups. more>>

Before I walked into the conference room of The Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) that afternoon, I knew very little about the biometric system and its implications for Ghana’s 2012 elections. And though I learnt a lot that day, I am still not one of the self-proclaimed experts of the biometric voter registration system who shout themselves coarse everyday on our airwaves.

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Elections are around the corner in both America and Ghana and the airwaves are filled with spin. In the United States, former pizza mogul Herman Cain’s campaign is over due to accusations relating to womanizing and harassment.

Here in Ghana, every few days, there are accusations about the moral failings of one candidate or another. There are charges of womanizing, homosexuality, drug use and lack of smarts.

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Other Stories

Book Review: The living story of the poor village boy who became the first presiding bishop
I enjoy reading biographies but I have over-enjoyed reading the autobiography of the Most Rev. Dr. Asante Antwi. His book, ‘Samuel Asante Antwi – a living story’ is 160-pages of courage, perseverance, patriotism, Christian teachings and achievements of a poor, village boy who saw the heavens as the limit and rose through the firmaments to become the First Presiding Bishop of the Methodist Church, Ghana. This autobiography can also be described as a biography of Ghana, from 1937, through the formation of the UGCC in 1947, the confidence and pride of a young, nation with an energetic leadership after Independence after 1957, the dictatorship of the 1960s, the short constitutional interludes, coups and more coups before the last push for the longest, most stable period of constitutional rule since 1957.
London (UK) – 23 April 2011 – The Times - Beneath a dilapidated shack Frank Ofori leaps casually into the entrance of a crumbling mineshaft that plunges 200ft into the earth. With a torch strapped to his head and three sticks of dynamite in his back pocket he begins a ten-hour shift underground in the Kenyase mine camp, 200 miles (320km) north of Accra, where thousands of prospectors risk their lives in the hope of finding gold.
Fmr. President Kufuor to address 2nd Liberty Lecture
The Danquah Institute is pleased to invite members of the general public to the 2nd Liberty Lecture. The lecture is on the theme: “Development in Freedom: Empowering the People to Develop the Nation” and will be delivered by Mr. John Agyekum Kufuor, former president of the Republic of Ghana. The lecture will be chaired by Madam Ama Busia.
Putting our Teachers First - A Speech by Nana Akufo-Addo
I thank the organisers of this programme, executives of the Tertiary Education Students Confederacy (TESCON) of the NPP of both the Institute of Professional Studies (IPS) and the Accra College of Education, for the opportunity to speak to you this afternoon. I congratulate the outgone executives of IPS TESCON for their service, and commend the new ones for their offer of service. I am happy that, today, we are inaugurating formally the TESCON branch of the Accra College of Education. Click here for full speech
This election is about poverty, cost of living, unemployment and corruption
Let no one attempt to fool you. Don't be distracted by the frustrations of the Rawlingses; nor talk about electoral violence. Don't be tricked by any attempt to revive the debased debate on drugs, God-fearism, morality, arrogance, character. While these topics may make the election 'exciting', since none of the main candidates is a stranger to us, we should protect the political space from being hijacked by the apostles of diversionism.
ECOWAS must Not Give up on Diplomacy on Cote D'ivoire
Ghana is presently caught in the whirlwind of Africa’s latest political quagmire: the post-election turmoil in Ivory Coast. President Mills has decided against sending Ghanaian soldiers as part of an ECOWAS-superintended military force to oust the ostensibly recalcitrant Laurent Gbagbo. The Ghanaian president’s bold decision to reject a regional plan to employ military action against the leadership of a fellow sovereign African nation-state is the right one, even if the reasons the nation’s public servant numero uno has given his fellow Ghanaians and the international community are not tenable.
Danquah Institute Gets New Executive Director
The Governing Board of the Danquah Institute announces the appointment of Nana Attobrah Quaicoe as the new Executive Director of the Danquah Institute, effective September 1, 2015.
The purpose of this short paper is to assess the challenge of regional unity like the East African Community (EAC) from the standpoint of pan-Africanism. We use the term ‘regional unity’, or regionalism, to refer to include both economic integration and political association. As we celebrate the 10th anniversary of the second-generation East African Community, it is opportune to stand back from the dominant debates on forms of integration – common market, monetary union, fast-tracking or snail-walking of the East African Federation etc. – and ask certain core questions: What exactly is the vision, the lodestar, so to speak, of the regional project? What is its historical genesis? What are the driving forces of the project, in whose interest and for what purpose? How does the project relate to the larger global forces, and in particular, to the changing world hegemonies? It is only by asking these bigger questions that we can critically assess where we are going and chart the possible way forward. It is not my intention to enter into a debate on the merits or demerits of the forms of economic integration or the speed of political association. Rather I wish to pose the question as to whether we are asking the right questions. more >>>
Ghana sits on time bomb – Capt. Koomson
A retired officer of the Ghana Armed Forces, Captain Budu Koomson, believes prevailing conditions in the country make the staging of a coup d’état imminent. This, according to him, was because “the blatant abuse of state wealth by political operatives can trigger something like this coupled with the political stalemate in the society.”
 
This is the Age Distribution of Ghana’s 2010 population of 24.391 million. This number includes all persons domiciled in Ghana as at 2010 regardless of citizenship. Although the elections were held in 2012, the voter register was compiled at a time when these were the population distribution Read More