The most talked about global issue in Ghana is unemployment, mentioned three times more frequently by Ghanaians than the global average (49% vs 16%). Corruption is the second most discussed issue (42%, twice as many as the global average) and is also the most serious global problem, rated as veryserious by 77 per cent of respondents. Extreme poverty (65%) and the spread of human diseases (58%) are ranked second and third respectively, and are rated comparably with the global averages (69% and 55%, respectively).

Click here for further findings

With almost 90 percent of polling places reporting, Congolese President Joseph Kabila appears to have won another five years in office with nearly half the vote. But the country will not know officially until Thursday due to a 48 hour delay in the release of final results.

Read more...

Unemployment is the world's fastest-rising worry, a BBC World Service survey covering 11,000 people in 23 countries suggests. The annual poll, called The World Speaks, gave people a list of concerns and asked which they had discussed with friends or family in the past month.

Corruption and poverty still ranked the highest, but unemployment was mentioned by 18% - six times the rate citing it in the first survey in 2009.

Read more...

General Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu died last weekend. His death brings to a certain climax the drama of a true, modern Nigerian epic. Olusegun Obasanjo was right this time in describing Ojukwu’s death as “the end of an era.”

At the passing of Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu described Zik as “the Alpha and the Omega of modern Nigeria,” just as he characterised Obafemi Awolowo as “the best President Nigeria never had,” thus melding paradox with hyperbole in an equal alchemy of mystery.

Read more...

Other Stories

Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu (1933-2011)
General Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu died last weekend. His death brings to a certain climax the drama of a true, modern Nigerian epic. Olusegun Obasanjo was right this time in describing Ojukwu’s death as “the end of an era.” At the passing of Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu described Zik as “the Alpha and the Omega of modern Nigeria,” just as he characterised Obafemi Awolowo as “the best President Nigeria never had,” thus melding paradox with hyperbole in an equal alchemy of mystery.
Balancing Speed With Justice, The Task Before The 9 Justices
There is some considerable weight of apprehension across the country. On the one hand, there are people who are a fearful of trouble were the court to rule against the petitioners and there are those who fear the reaction of the ruling party were the court to rule for the petitioners. But one thing ( I hope) unites all sides of the anxiety chain, they want this case to be disposed off (not ‘speedily’, perhaps, but expeditiously and in the interest of justice). Indeed, such is the level of this apprehension that the Editorial of the Accra Mail last week, ‘Ghana’s Peace & Security in the hands of the NPP’ said, “It may seem all so civilized - that is [NPP] resorting to court action – but many a blood-letter situation has started that way: the refusal to accept election results. Do NPP leaders in their wildest dreams think that Ghana would survive the turmoil of a disruption in the status quo? If that’s their mindset, then their naïveté approaches criminal nonchalance! Reason and wisdom must prevail as they strategise for 2016. They must listen to compatriots like Opanin Adusei, Dr Wereko-Brobby and discontinue this litigation to save our nation the trauma their action is inexorably leading us to.” In a curious twist, Haruna Attah’s paper is asking whether the NPP was ready for the disruption that could occur if the Supreme Court gave a ruling that would disturb the ‘status quo’, meaning a decision which would invalidate the results declared by the Electoral Commission.
FACT: Mills has had more spending money in 3 years than Kufuor in 8: Na Sika No Wo He Ne?
For any president seeking a second term the task is straight forward: you have only one thing to rely on -- your first term performance. You have to show what you have done with your current mandate to justify why you deserve a second term. That performance will depend to some degree on the record you inherited. Nevertheless, regardless of what was bequeathed to you, voters look out for how you have dealt with the issues that have confronted the nation under your stewardship.
Looking back and forward: the world’s financial system
The financial system is the nerve centre of the modern economy. Banks pool the capital of savers and lend it to companies at longer maturities, allowing them to invest in new initiatives for continuous expansion. They provide cash machines, credit cards, debit cards and so on allowing the vast majority of commercial activities to take place. The capital market allows companies to raise capital at a reduced cost, enabling risk to be effectively managed. The financial freeze starting September 2008 was accompanied with a corresponding held up in all these commercial activities, plummeting national economies and the world economy at large into the biggest recession since the end of World War II. Recent economic reports across the world’s heavy economies suggest the world economy is steadily responding to growth. Britain is the latest to have announced its economy is officially out of recession. German and France were first to have recorded positive growth figures. America so far has been cautious about its figures but for the first time over a year the American economy has recorded an expansion. The message coming out so far is good taking into account the fact that the world economy came to near collapse.
On June 26, 2013, Justice Atuguba, the presiding judge of the 9-member panel used the Court as a vehicle to accuse Samuel Awuku of engaging in an ill- defined, improper conduct. The said conduct appears to be related to comments that Mr. Awuku made on air, during a political discussion. In particular, he is said to have criticized the panel for “being selective and hypocritical,” in citing a Daily Guide reportage of the Court’s proceedings. Mr. Awuku subsequently appeared before the panel and after a short hearing, in which he apologized for his comments, the panel banned him from making further appearances in the Court. As far as I could tell, Mr. Awuku was not represented by counsel. Nor was he accused of a specific offence (as far as I could tell).
REPORT OF THE ELECTORAL REFORMS COMMITTEE SUBMITTED TO THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION OF THE REPUBLIC OF GHANA
We, members of the Electoral Reforms Committee wish to thank the almighty God for the strength, health and travelling mercies granted us throughout our various meetings, discussions and retreat sessions held outside Accra in executing our mandate as spelt out in our Terms of Reference. We thank the Chairman and Members of the Electoral Commission for giving us the opportunity to serve mother Ghana. To Mr Gabriel Pwamang the consultant to the Committee, we say: “...we are grateful to you for your assistance and for bringing your competence, expertise and legal acumen to bear on the work of the Committee.” Read more >>>
The Association of Magistrates and Judges (AMJG) has noted with grave concern, the recent press statement of the ruling National Democratic Congress which was delivered by its National Chairman, Dr. Kwabena Adjei in response to a ruling of the High Court that discharged Dr. Charles Wereko-Brobbey and Mr. Kwadwo Mpiani, the two accused persons in the Ghana @ 50 trial. It has become pertinent for us to explain how the Judiciary goes about its work in response to the very issues raised at the Press Conference organized by the NDC on 17th August, 2010.
 EC BUDGETS $230M FOR NEW VOTERS REGISTER Kenya did same for $95M
Credible information available to the New Statesman indicates that the Electoral Commission has prepared a budget of $230 million for a possible compilation of a new biometric voters register for the 2016 general elections.
Ghana police criminally prosecute journalist over sources
New York, July 23, 2010—The Committee to Protect Journalists calls on Ghana ’s attorney general to drop prosecution of prominent journalist Ato Kwamena Dadzie under the 1960 criminal code in an attempt to get him to reveal his sources. The Criminal Investigations Department of the Ghana Police Service on Monday charged Dadzie, acting editor of Accra-based private station Joy FM, with publishing false news “with intent to cause fear and alarm,” defense lawyer Shadrach Arhin told CPJ. Dadzie is free on a bail bond of 5,000 cedis (US$3,430) and faces a misdemeanor offense carrying a maximum sentence of two years in prison or a fine, according to his lawyer. Police referred the case to the attorney general’s office for legal advice, he said.
CNN) -- The recent history of the U.S. nuclear industry suggests that nuclear power can be a safe source of low-carbon electricity. But disasters can happen very quickly, with potentially cataclysmic results. The loss of coolant, explosions and apparent partial meltdown of nuclear plants in Japan following the earthquake and tsunami remind us that nuclear power is inherently risky. The U.S. government and the nuclear industry must take new actions to ensure that nuclear power is safe for the American public. New nuclear reactors are phenomenally expensive, costing up to $10 billion dollars apiece. Exelon CEO John Rowe said recently that the combination of low natural gas prices and failure of Congress to put a price on carbon dioxide pollution pushes back any significant nuclear renaissance by a "decade, maybe two."