Elections are around the corner in both America and Ghana and the airwaves are filled with spin. In the United States, former pizza mogul Herman Cain’s campaign is over due to accusations relating to womanizing and harassment.

Here in Ghana, every few days, there are accusations about the moral failings of one candidate or another. There are charges of womanizing, homosexuality, drug use and lack of smarts.

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An Accra High Court (Cocoa Affairs, Court 11) presided over by His Lordship Patrick Baayeh has handed down a heavy judgement on the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) and Tema Oil Refinery (TOR) in a case in which three plaintiffs accused the NPAand TOR of inflating fuel prices and using the money for hidden purposes. more>>

The Executive Director of the Danquah Institute Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko is mocking government’s attempt to reverse the falling standards in education. Results released by the West African Examination Council show that over half of the students who sat for this year’s Basic Education Certificate Exams failed and could not proceed to the Second Cycle Education.

It is reported to be the worst performance in 13 years.

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THINK OF the revolutions in the Middle East as Act 1 in a five-act play that may not conclude for a generation or more. Nearly a year since protests in Tunisia ignited a regional wave of reform and revolt, the euphoria and hope of last January has turned to frustration and cynicism as Egyptians battle their military government in Cairo and sectarian war in Syria intensifies.

The Arab world may be heading for an unpredictable and violent Act 2 in 2012.

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Other Stories

Zambia's Banda loses second term bid to old rival
Zambia’s opposition leader Mr Michael Sata of Patriotic Front (PF) has defeated the incumbent President Mr Rupiah Banda of Movement for Multi-party Democracy (MMD) in a tightly contested presidential election. In 2008 Mr Sata lost the presidential election to Banda by 35,000 votes in an election triggered by the sudden death of Levy Mwanawasa.
Jubilee Field's Project Costs Inflated?
IMANI recently issued a statement about what we believe are major fiscal risks that need to be managed by government. One of the two major risks we cited is the declining level of production in the Jubilee field. In simple words, the amount of oil being produced in Ghana’s only producing oil field is *falling*, and therefore generating less cash than expected for the government’s budget. Production has fallen from a peak of nearly 90,000 barrels per day in 2011 to nearly 60,000 barrels today.
Seven in ten Africans own their own mobile phones, with access essentially universal in Algeria and Senegal, according to Afrobarometer findings from across 34 countries. The report, based on face-to-face interviews with more than 51,000 people, reveals that 84% use cell phones at least occasionally, a higher level of access than reported previously by the United Nations. Internet use is less common - with only 18% using it at least monthly. These technological trends are detailed in Afrobarometer's report, "The Partnership of Free Speech and Good Governance in Africa," released today at the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Nairobi. Written by Winnie Mitullah and Paul Kamau at IDS, the report identifies the countries with the highest and lowest use of information and communications technologies.
Oil + Tribal Bigotry + Hegemonism-a recipe for civil war in Ghana
Tribal CancerThere is a cancer eating into our national fabric. It is the cancer of tribalism. There are elements in Ghana especially the so-called opinion leaders whose incorrigible mindset of tribal bigotry would derail any inter-tribal harmony and pacification efforts in Ghana. It seems our national leaders have no desire to resolve the issue of tribalism. Tribalism spans the political divide. For most of our post independence history, Ghanaians have lived relatively peaceful lives without regards to tribal or ethnic origins. Today the simmering flame of tribal bigotry has reached epic proportions and unless our national leaders take bold actions to confront it now; Ghana might one day be engulfed in a civil war. Diversity and Harmony in Obuasi.
Commodity prices decreased by 2.0% in 1H13, according to the IMF’s All Commodity Price Index, of which metals saw the biggest price drop. The metals price index fell by 12.0%, while fuels declined by 1.9% over the period (this decline was muted by an increase in the WTI crude oil price). Conversely, the food and beverage price index increased by 1.8%. However, this was largely due to a 2.9% increase in the food price index, which countered a 10.4% drop in the beverage price index. When the price of a country’s exports is falling relative to the price of its imports, the country’s terms of trade are declining and it is actually becoming poorer. For Sub-Saharan Africa’s (SSA) net commodity exporters, falling commodity prices imply a decline in the volume of imported goods that can be obtained per unit of goods exported (terms of trade), ceteris paribus. This implies that their consumption is likely to have been dampened by falling export commodity prices, particularly of metals, beverages and fuel. Using econometric analysis, we estimate the impact of softer prices for commodities that dominate Ghana, Zambia, Kenya and Nigeria’s trade accounts, on their respective per capita income growth rates.
Arab Awakening, Act 2
THINK OF the revolutions in the Middle East as Act 1 in a five-act play that may not conclude for a generation or more. Nearly a year since protests in Tunisia ignited a regional wave of reform and revolt, the euphoria and hope of last January has turned to frustration and cynicism as Egyptians battle their military government in Cairo and sectarian war in Syria intensifies. The Arab world may be heading for an unpredictable and violent Act 2 in 2012.
Pass the Books. Hold the Oil.
EVERY so often someone asks me: “What’s your favorite country, other than your own?” I’ve always had the same answer: Taiwan. “Taiwan? Why Taiwan?” people ask. Very simple: Because Taiwan is a barren rock in a typhoon-laden sea with no natural resources to live off of — it even has to import sand and gravel from China for construction — yet it has the fourth-largest financial reserves in the world.
Letter from NPP Chairman to EC Boss
We refer you to our previous correspondence on the need to get IPAC convened and deliberating on matters regarding the forthcoming Biometric Voter Registration (BVR) exercise and other issues pertaining to the 2012 general elections. Our call for specific information and material to enable us convince ourselves that the “tender process” leading to the procurement of equipment and materials is credible has fallen on, sadly, deaf ears. Click here for full details of letter
BOG has not taken any decision to close all foreign deposit accounts
The Bank of Ghana’s attention has been drawn to media reports being attributed to the Bank that it is planning on closing all foreign deposit accounts and has instructed that a 2% per annum charge be levied on all foreign deposit accounts in the banks. The general public and all stakeholders are assured that the Bank of Ghana has not taken any such decision.
E-voting handbook
E-voting refers to an election or referendum that involves the use of electronic means in at least the casting of the vote. The introduction of e-voting raises some of the same challenges as are faced when applying electronics to any other subject, for example e-government. Politicians or administrators may perhaps expect that a paper version of a certain service or process can simply be taken and put on the Internet. Unfortunately, the reality is more complex, and nowhere more so than with e-voting. Click here for full article