General Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu died last weekend. His death brings to a certain climax the drama of a true, modern Nigerian epic. Olusegun Obasanjo was right this time in describing Ojukwu’s death as “the end of an era.”

At the passing of Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu described Zik as “the Alpha and the Omega of modern Nigeria,” just as he characterised Obafemi Awolowo as “the best President Nigeria never had,” thus melding paradox with hyperbole in an equal alchemy of mystery.

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Madam Speaker, thank you for this opportunity to contribute to the motion on the Budget Statement for 2012. The budget is the most important document that governments produce. It is a powerful tool in influencing economic and social development. The budget determines whether there is equitable access to services by different groups of the population such as women, children, the disabled, the poor and other minority groups. more>>

Before I walked into the conference room of The Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) that afternoon, I knew very little about the biometric system and its implications for Ghana’s 2012 elections. And though I learnt a lot that day, I am still not one of the self-proclaimed experts of the biometric voter registration system who shout themselves coarse everyday on our airwaves.

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Elections are around the corner in both America and Ghana and the airwaves are filled with spin. In the United States, former pizza mogul Herman Cain’s campaign is over due to accusations relating to womanizing and harassment.

Here in Ghana, every few days, there are accusations about the moral failings of one candidate or another. There are charges of womanizing, homosexuality, drug use and lack of smarts.

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(PANA)-- African foreign ministers meeting on Thursday, January 27,eugene came under pressure from foreign partners on the need to correct the continent’s electoral flaws that have precipitated the kind of post-election crisis in Cote d’Ivoire. Denmark’s Foreign Minister Lene Espersen told the opening session of the AU’s Executive Council meeting that despite overall progress in the field of democratisation, the challenge of organising free and fair elections and lack of proper state institutions constituted a worrying trend in Africa.‘It is unfortunate that recently, we have seen a number of challenges to electoral processes and institutions, latest in Cote d’Ivoire,’ she said.
What has all this to do with Obama’s trip?
Negotiations are not held in a vacuum. A nation that sits around the table without prior knowledge and appreciation of its own strengths and weaknesses in its counterpart’s mind has provided gaping holes in its negotiation armoury and is bound to come out with a bad deal. A good deal depends on both an understanding of the cards in your hands and your opponent’s, and the skilful and strategic play of these cards. The first of these cards that the Ghanaian government must not fail to appreciate is the fact that Superpower America now sees West Africa as a zone of strategic importance – it’s no longer a question of just us needing them, but they now also need us.
A ruling not in the supreme interest of the nation
In a 5-4 ruling, the nine-panel Justices of Ghana’s Supreme Court on August 29 dismissed the petition filed by the NPP, challenging the validity of the Dec 7, 2012 presidential election won by the current president, John Mahama. Nana Akuffo-Addo, the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) challenger and petitioner called the president to concede defeat and congratulated him. He also called on his supporters to accept the verdict, though he disagreed with it, and later announced that he was going to take some time off politics to rest.
In the last five months alone, President J E A Mills has made two 3-day official trips to Equatorial Guinea and has on both occasions returned to Ghana with news of striking significantly different crude oil deals with his Equatorial Guinean counterpart, President Theodore Nguema Mbasogo. The Danquah Institute is also extremely disturbed by moves by the Government of Ghana to rescue a Korean company that is US$6.3 billion in debt, whilst thousands of Ghanaian companies are also in distress and would require only a fraction of that amount to stimulate them back into productivity and profitability. more >>>
REPORT OF THE ELECTORAL REFORMS COMMITTEE SUBMITTED TO THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION OF THE REPUBLIC OF GHANA
We, members of the Electoral Reforms Committee wish to thank the almighty God for the strength, health and travelling mercies granted us throughout our various meetings, discussions and retreat sessions held outside Accra in executing our mandate as spelt out in our Terms of Reference. We thank the Chairman and Members of the Electoral Commission for giving us the opportunity to serve mother Ghana. To Mr Gabriel Pwamang the consultant to the Committee, we say: “...we are grateful to you for your assistance and for bringing your competence, expertise and legal acumen to bear on the work of the Committee.” Read more >>>
The government announced a 30% increase in ex-pump price of petroleum products with the build up covering crude oil price, TOR debt recovery levy, BOST levy, markerting and distribution margins. There is likely not to be cheap conventional oil any longer . for the past decade, global crude oil output has hovered between 62 million barrels per day and 65 million barrels except in 2006 when it reached 67 million barrels before falling to 65 million barrels and has remained there. At the same time upstream investments are not matching the global supply requirement during to increasing demand. The recent global recovery led by Asia and to some extent Latin America has further put pressure on supply. Global demand is ever increasing and will increase further with the growing global economy. Countries are therefore bracing up to the phenomenon of high oil prices. Some are increasing their efforts at alternative energy mainstreaming and others are introducing conservation programmes.
Joint Parliamentary Committee Report on GREDA's Petition to Parliament
On Wednesday 30th June 2010, the Rt. Hon Speaker referred a Complaint she received from the Ghana real Estate Developers Association (GREDA) in respect of the supplier's Credit Financing Agreement between Government of the Republic of Ghana and STX Engineering and Construction Ghana Limited for an mount of one billion, five hundred and twenty-five million, four hundred and forty-three thousand, four hundred and sixty-eight United States Dollars (US$1,525,443,468.00) for the construction of 30,000 Housing Units under the Security Services Housing Project to the Joint Committee on Finance and Works and Housing for consideration and report Click Here for More >>>
Report On The Presidential Election Petition In Ghana – 23 February 2013
The international community, generally, endorsed Ghana’s 2012 elections as “free and fair.” Ghana, the continent’s star of democracy, had done it once again for Africa. John Mahama, the declared winner, was duly sworn in without any violent protests on January 7, 2013. But, the country’s biggest opposition party filed a petition in Ghana’s supreme court, (the first of its kind in the country’s history), challenging the presidential results. It is noteworthy that since the first election of Ghana’s Fourth Republic in 1992, 2012 was the only other time that a majority of the political parties (5 out of 7) that participated in the contest had come out to raise major concerns about the conduct of the polls. Indeed, the second runner-up and leader of the Progressive People’s Party, Dr Papa Kwesi Nduom, is on record as saying, "I have been involved in elections since 1992 and this is the worst in terms of credibility." See link: http://www.theafricareport.com/News-Analysis/ghana-election-results-another-party-backs-npp-fraud-claims.html
This year is the 150th anniversary of the unification of Italy, a year in which the world should be celebrating all that is great about Italian heritage and culture. Instead, newspapers are filled with stories of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi hosting orgy parties, patronizing an under-age prostitute, and refusing to repudiate a dictator that massacres his own citizens. In a time of global economic weakness, internal economic challenges in Europe, revolutions along Italy's periphery in North Africa, and NATO struggles in Afghanistan, it is the wrong time for a country as important as Italy to have a leader that has become a national disgrace and a global embarrassment. IN BED WITH QADDAFI: For years, Berlusconi cultivated a close relationship with Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi. Time Magazine assessed that "of all the mutual back-scratching among Europe's rich democracies and North Africa's strongmen, Italy's dependency on Gaddafi stands apart." The relationship was so cozy that, according to Bloomberg News, "Berlusconi shut down the city's biggest park in June 2009 to allow the visiting Libyan leader and his entourage of all- female bodyguards to set up camp by the 16th-century Villa Doria Pamphili." The relationship brought immense economic benefit to both countries.
In a couple of weeks time fuel prices will go up, the PURC may announce new utility prices and with no immediate hope of processing Ghana’s wet gas into fuel for electricity, the bills are likely to go up, as well. Parents, many of them unemployed, may have to find money from any means necessary to pay for their kids’ second term fees. Poverty, unemployment, road traffic, personal insecurity and all the old ills of our impoverished society remain either unresolved or worsening. But, forget about the traffic to buy LPG gas, the traffic to work and back, the traffic to fill job vacancies, the traffic, generally, to getting anything fixed or done in Ghana. The one traffic that appears to excite media and political attention is drug trafficking.