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We have taken note of Government’s statement on the abolishing of illegal fuel price margins by the High Court. The statement is most unfortunate. In particular, the argument by Government that the removal of the illegal price top-ups will lead to higher fuel prices is deceitful.

For the benefit of the public, we quote the petroleum pricing formula made pursuant to the National Petroleum Authority Act, 2005 (Act 691): more>>

For several weeks now, accusations have been flung back and forth between the election commission and the opposition about the voter register, a database of around 32 million voters that identifies those eligible to vote in the November elections. The stakes are potentially huge, as if the register is rigged, it will be difficult for observers at the polling stations to identify fraud.

The report is a confidential document written in early August by Zetes, a Belgian company contracted by the Congolese government to issue biometric voters cards.

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A recent decision by an Accra High Court could have misunderstood the use of the Ex-refinery price differential In the calculation of fuel pump prices and this may force Government to raise retail pump prices if the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) loses its appeal and Government is mandated to carry out the court order.

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The most talked about global issue in Ghana is unemployment, mentioned three times more frequently by Ghanaians than the global average (49% vs 16%). Corruption is the second most discussed issue (42%, twice as many as the global average) and is also the most serious global problem, rated as veryserious by 77 per cent of respondents. Extreme poverty (65%) and the spread of human diseases (58%) are ranked second and third respectively, and are rated comparably with the global averages (69% and 55%, respectively).

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Other Stories

Election 2012 petition verdict: Judgement of JSC Ansah
The facts surrounding this suit have been fully played out in near epic dimensions before the public. However, there is no way this suit can be seen as a likeness of the numerous cases on various aspects of our 1992 Constitution. Indeed, I venture to say it cannot be compared to any of the cases touching on various aspects of all our previous Constitutions.
What is the real state of our economy - Excerpts of
Dr. Mahamudu Bawumia, the NPP vice presidential candidate for the 2012 elections has cast doubt on the official figures about the state of Ghana’s economy. In a Ferdinand O. Ayim memorial speech he delivered in Accra on Wednesday May 2, 2012 on the subject, “THE STATE OF OUR ECONOMY” Dr. Bawumia gave a cogent and tightly argued analysis of the current state of the Ghanaian economy.
Press Release: Govt Should Stop Creating ‘Propaganda Jobs’ and Focus on Real Job Creation
In his State of the Nation address this year, President John Mills admitted that his administration was yet to make any impact in the jobs market but expressed optimism. “As the measures we took to halt the decline in the economy last year such as lower interest rates and increased credit to the private sector begin to translate into a much more conducive employment generation environment, we expect a turnaround in the jobs market. Meanwhile I have directed all sectors to mainstream job-creation into their programmes and Ministers are required by the middle of the year to produce sector blueprints for the creation of jobs.” Yet, his Information Ministry has gone as far as to tell Ghanaians that the turn around in the jobs market has already begun in a big way even before the Government’s concerted policy on job creation has been formulated.
We Must Take Postive Lessons From Kenya’s Women Only Elections
As we join the rest of the world in commemorating today, 8th March, as International Women’s Day, we wish to use this occasion to address the unacceptable issue of very low representation of women in governance and decision-making in Ghana and many other African countries and commend the great strides being made elsewhere on the continent. In spite of all the difficulties, we recognise the progress being made by the African woman, especially, in societies that are becoming somewhat gingerly tolerant against the pull of enduring prejudices.
So Who Are The Real Property-Owning Democrats?
Last week I wrote, "As an ardent believer of a property-owning democracy and a fierce critic of the shameful, lackluster commitment that the NPP showed in realizing this -- its philosophy -- when it was in office for 8 years, my initial reaction was one of great excitement to the news that a public-private-partnership was going to add 200,000 new, decent, affordable homes to the local housing stock. I greeted the news with some chuffy grin of irony: it took a so-called capitalist party to implement a health insurance policy and it is taking a so-called social democratic party to democratize property ownership." The NPP's founding father, the great man, Joseph Boakye Danquah, saw it as the patriotic duty of the party in government “to liberate the energies of the people for the growth of a property-owning democracy in this land, with right to life, freedom and justice, as the principles to which the Government and laws of the land should be dedicated in order specifically to enrich life, property and liberty of each and every citizen.”
President Obama’s Shadow on Ghana’s Elections
Ghana was the first sub-Saharan African country U.S. President Barak Obama visited in July 2009. He selected Ghana because it was a “model of good governance, democracy and strong civil society participation.” Kenyans were miffed that he did not visit his fatherland and the Nigerians smelled a rat: That his visit to Ghana was an insipid conspiracy to destabilize Nigeria. But Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka disagreed: A visit by Obama would have sanctified the putrid mess called Nigeria. He threatened to have Obama stoned if he stepped foot in the country. Mercifully, President Obama wasn’t stoned in Ghana.
The Wilson Center Honors Howard Wolpe: Life Celebrated for Work in Congress and as Special Envoy
WASHINGTON—Friends, former colleagues, and family members gathered on Thursday to remember Howard Wolpe, who as a diplomat, lawmaker, and director of The Wilson Center's Africa Program worked tirelessly for peace in Africa, from helping to bring democratic majority rule to South Africa to conflict-prone regions like the Great Lakes. “Howard was a champion of all the right causes,” said Susan Rice, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, in a ceremony that included addresses from the Hon. Donald Payne (D-NJ), as well as former Representatives the Hon. David Bonior (D-MI) and the Hon. William H. Gray III (D-PA). Also participating in the service at the Ronald Reagan Building was Ambassador Faida Mitifu, from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Dean of the African diplomatic corps, Jim Margolis and Steve Weissman, former staffers of Wolpe, and Jane Harman, President of the Wilson Center. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) paid tribute via video, as did Rep. John Dingell (D-MI). Wolpe died in October 2011. Present at the celebration of Wolpe’s life were a large number of Senators and Representatives, active and former, and several other African ambassadors and embassy representatives.
The Danquah Institute is organsing a symposium at the University of Ghana on Thursday, 17 September. The theme of the symposium is: Has Ghana a Founder or Founders? The symposium is part of DI's mission to enhance today's generation of Ghanaians' appreciation of the country's history as an essential part of efforts towards nation-building. The symposium is being organised in conjunction with the national secretariat of the Graduate Students Association of Ghana (GRASAG). It will take place at 4pm at the conference hall of the Kwame Nkrumah Complex, Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra and feature speakers and historians from different ideological traditions.
Ghana: lies, damn lies and estimates
New oil, Chinese investment, stable government, highest growth in the world: Ghana is a new success story. But be careful with the exact figures. While all countries revise their GDP numbers and other accounts, Ghana’s revision of the data takes some beating. The Q2 GDP figure was reported in September as 33.5 per cent. The new figure? 16.4 per cent, less than half. Other numbers given for individual sectors are even further reduced.
Book Review: The living story of the poor village boy who became the first presiding bishop
I enjoy reading biographies but I have over-enjoyed reading the autobiography of the Most Rev. Dr. Asante Antwi. His book, ‘Samuel Asante Antwi – a living story’ is 160-pages of courage, perseverance, patriotism, Christian teachings and achievements of a poor, village boy who saw the heavens as the limit and rose through the firmaments to become the First Presiding Bishop of the Methodist Church, Ghana. This autobiography can also be described as a biography of Ghana, from 1937, through the formation of the UGCC in 1947, the confidence and pride of a young, nation with an energetic leadership after Independence after 1957, the dictatorship of the 1960s, the short constitutional interludes, coups and more coups before the last push for the longest, most stable period of constitutional rule since 1957.