Figures from the West African Examinations Council show that the pass-rate of students who sat for the Basic Education Certificate Examination has been on a constant downward decline since 2009. In sum, out of the total number of 1,121,817 students who sat for the BECE in the past three years, 574,688 failed to achieve the pass mark.

This means that more than half a million young people, with an average age of 15 years, have been thrown onto the streets with no employable skills in the past three years alone.

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The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results.

Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, warned against the pursuit of “white elephant projects.”

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The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results.

Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, has called for a competent assessment of infrastructural projects to ensure that Ghana consistently gets value for money and that such investment spending does not disturb future national budgets and the country’s ability to pay off its debts.

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Wednesday, sounding rather frail, the absentee Minister of Health, gave interviews to say that no, he had not gone on leave to campaign in his constituency. He was only there to ‘interact’ as part of his medical leave. Joseph Yieleh Chireh was reacting to a report in the Chronicle that while patients were suffering under the doctors’ strike, the minister responsible was campaigning in his Wa West Constituency, Upper West Region.

The Chronicle said “Mr Yieleh Chireh was at the Dabu Electoral Area in the Upper West Region on Tuesday, holding meetings with NDC executives in the constituency, in a bid to retain him to contest the [parliamentary] elections” next year.

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Mills must grab ethics with long hand of law
As a Cabinet Minister for seven years and the presidential candidate for the ruling party in 2008, Nana Akufo-Addo served the nation with ad admirable level of over-and-above self-imposed ethical principles. These included, not applying for state lands and even refusing to draw on his allocation of fuel, to which every Minister (and others) was entitled. In fact, the story is told of him getting very furious to come back from a trip abroad on an official duty only to find out that his driver had gone to the Castle to claim fuel on his account.However, rather than praising it as exemplifying the kind of leadership that Ghana needs, this has been subjected to charges of “hypocrisy”, “holier-than-thou”, “shopping your colleagues”, etc., against him. He has been put on the defensive for being extra-ethical! Leading this charge have been two the Spokesperson for Vice President John Mahama, John Abu Jinapor. Also notable are pro-Mills newspapers such as, the Insight and Enquirer.
Death threats forced GREDA’s back-traction
The Ghana Real Estates Developers Association (GREDA) may have withdrawn its petition to Parliament on the STX housing deal because its executives were threatened with death. Source close to GREDA tell Joy News some members of the association also became worried that their contracts with government could be abrogated after the association criticized the proposed deal with the Korean company, but GREDA has declined to confirm or deny the reports.
Required proof for criminal allegations in election petitions
It is elementary, yet fundamental, that every criminal allegation must be proved beyond all reasonable doubt to earn a conviction. This much is at the heart of developed theories of criminal justice in many cultures. However, England’s William Blackstone was quoted to have said, “better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer”. Lord Sankey, of the English House of Lords, subsequently summarised the core postulation through his famous ‘Golden Thread’ speech that, “Throughout the web of the English Criminal Law, one golden thread is always to be seen, that it is the duty of the prosecution to prove the prisoner’s guilt…If at the end of the case, there is a reasonable doubt created by the evidence given by either the prosecution or the prisoner,…..the prosecution has not made out the case and the prisoner is entitled to an acquittal. No matter what the charge and where the trial, the principle that the prosecution must prove the guilt of the prisoner is part of the Common Law of England and no attempt to whittle it down can be entertained” Woolmington v DPP (1935) AC 462.
Why Mugabe should not have been at Copenhagen
That Robert Mugabe should lead an entourage of sixty Zimbabwean technocrats on an expensive frolic to participate in discussions on global warming in Copenhagen is a grave travesty of justice. How a man under ‘EU sanctions’ can evade arrest for crimes against ‘nature and humanity’ is only explainable by the mysterious world of United Nations protocol. Moreover, though the general position is that African and G77 countries are the least offenders in carbon dioxide emission, there is critical evidence to prove that Mugabe’s violent ten-year land grab has been responsible for desertification of previously arable commercial farmland.
INTRODUCTION The process is underway to pass a law that will determine how we use our Oil resources. We at IMANI,AfricanLiberty.org and African Leadership Initiative) have been involved with the analysis of best options for a while. Our review of the Proposals towards the law reveals that the provisions in the bill are likely to lead to the following: Resource Curse phenomenon, as with Nigeria Dutch Disease, where other industries will be neglected and may shrink Political tension with dire consequences as people try to get access to loosely guarded oil revenue Agitation in the Western Region due to neglect and degradation Serious dislocations in the economy
Africa Human Development Report 2012 - Towards a Food Secure Future
Africa has seen an extraordinary rebound in economic growth over the past decade. Some of the world’s fastest growing economies are in Africa, and they have expanded even during the ongoing uncertainty in the global economy. This has brought a much-needed reduction in poverty in the region and a renewed sense of optimism about its future. There is no doubt that economic growth is critical for human development, and it is imperative that growth be sustained. Click here for full report
Multi-biometric identification helps ensure a fair and efficient election process in Kenya
Civil unrest in the aftermath of Kenya’s 2007 elections prompted the government of Kenya to completely overhaul its system of managing elections. The IIEC was formed to replace the previous Electoral Commission of Kenya and charged with the mission to institutionalize sustainable electoral processes that would guarantee fair elections. The mandate of the IIEC covered all aspects of implementing elections including reform of the electoral process; conducting a fresh registration of all Kenyan voters to create a completely new voter register; developing a modern system for collection, collation, transmission and tallying of electoral data and promoting voter education.
EOCO Report on Woyome Judgement Debt
In or about July, 2004, Ghana was awarded the right to host the 26th Cup of African Nations (CAN) 2008 football tournament. Among other things, the Conferederation of African Football (CAF) specified that the tournament should be held in at least four separate stadia Click here for full EOCO Report
I have chosen the topic, Islam, Politics and Development: Negotiating the Future of Dagbon for good reason. Islam, since its introduction into Dagbon in 1700 through the conversion of Na Zangina, has exerted great influence on the Dagomba people. Dagomba customs and traditions are inextricably interwoven with Islamic ones. Naming, marriage and funeral ceremonies all show considerable Islamic influences. Even the most important festival of the Dagomba people, Damba, is celebrated to commemorate or coincide with Prophet Muhammad’s birthday. As far back as 1820, Joseph Dupuis, the British Consul to Ghana, on the testimony of Yendi traders, classified Dagbon among “governments which are either purely Moslem, or countries where the Koranic law had been received and serves for the civil code of the believer and infidel. more >>>
Freedom  is indivisible
It is not possible to have liberty for some and not for others in the same country. Whilst blacks were being oppressed by apartheid in South Africa, the liberty of whites was being compromised by the measures necessary to suppress the aspirations of their fellow citizens (actually non citizens). Recently I reread Martin Luther King’s great “I have a dream” speech. I was again moved and inspired by its central message: a call for liberty for all Americans. King was not asking for the playing field to be tilted the other way. He was not asking for special privileges for black Americans so as to right the wrongs of the past. He knew that for liberty to prevail, the law should treat everyone the same; that there is no liberty for one unless there is equality before the law for all.