An Accra High Court (Cocoa Affairs, Court 11) presided over by His Lordship Patrick Baayeh has handed down a heavy judgement on the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) and Tema Oil Refinery (TOR) in a case in which three plaintiffs accused the NPAand TOR of inflating fuel prices and using the money for hidden purposes. more>>

The Constitution Review Commission (CRC) has recommended that the presidential and parliamentary elections be conducted in November in subsequent election years after 2012 to facilitate smooth transitional processes.

The commission further proposed the expunging of the indemnity clauses of the 1992 Constitution which provide coup makers immunity from prosecution.

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THINK OF the revolutions in the Middle East as Act 1 in a five-act play that may not conclude for a generation or more. Nearly a year since protests in Tunisia ignited a regional wave of reform and revolt, the euphoria and hope of last January has turned to frustration and cynicism as Egyptians battle their military government in Cairo and sectarian war in Syria intensifies.

The Arab world may be heading for an unpredictable and violent Act 2 in 2012.

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Apart from the $3 billion China Development Bank (CDB) loan approved last August, the Mills administration has lined up some 30 fresh loan agreements for parliamentary approval before the 2012 general elections.

Analysis done by The Globe newspaper puts the total value of these new loan facilities at more than US$ 4 billion.

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Other Stories

Electoral Commission Puts The Brakes On Ghana's Democracy Project
The belief in the power of institutions as a check on individual excesses, especially in the domain of politics goes back to antiquity. This is Brutus on the occasion of the coronation of his best friend, Julius Caesar: Crown him that, and then, I grant, we put a sting in him, That at his will he may do danger with. The abuse of greatness is, when it disjoins Remorse from power; and, to speak of conscience, Caesar, compassion I have not known when his affections swayed more than his reason.It is this same belief in the power of institutions as opposed to individuals in enhancing democratic governance which led President Barack Obama to admonish the Ghanaians during his visit to the country to strive to build stronger institutions to safeguard our nascent Democracy which was at that point becoming the envy of the world.
Why the west should rule out military action against Iran
With tough new sanctions in place, further measures threatened by Iran, naval forces mustering in the Persian Gulf, and state-sponsored terrorism ongoing, we are on the brink of a military conflict. Israel, at this very moment, is contemplating whether to undertake a strike. This would be calamitous, and could lead to regional war. What is desperately needed is a fresh assessment of the situation. The west's approach of sanctions and sabre-rattling are yesterday's failed policies. The fact we are once again on the cusp of conflict is testament to that failure.
The purpose of this short paper is to assess the challenge of regional unity like the East African Community (EAC) from the standpoint of pan-Africanism. We use the term ‘regional unity’, or regionalism, to refer to include both economic integration and political association. As we celebrate the 10th anniversary of the second-generation East African Community, it is opportune to stand back from the dominant debates on forms of integration – common market, monetary union, fast-tracking or snail-walking of the East African Federation etc. – and ask certain core questions: What exactly is the vision, the lodestar, so to speak, of the regional project? What is its historical genesis? What are the driving forces of the project, in whose interest and for what purpose? How does the project relate to the larger global forces, and in particular, to the changing world hegemonies? It is only by asking these bigger questions that we can critically assess where we are going and chart the possible way forward. It is not my intention to enter into a debate on the merits or demerits of the forms of economic integration or the speed of political association. Rather I wish to pose the question as to whether we are asking the right questions. more >>>
IMANI: Preliminary Position on the Wikileaks Saga
Wikileaks has enthralled Ghanaian pundits with yet another stash. Here is IMANI's initial stance on the revelations: 1. We accept that for the proper functioning of government and diplomacy a degree of confidentiality is important. 2. However, in a society where transparency is an issue, wikileaks when employed carefully can improve democratic outcomes.
Tullow Oil plc - Half year results
This presentation contains certain forward-looking statements that are subject to the usual risk factors and uncertainties associated with the oil and gas exploration and production business. Whilst Tullow believes the expectations reflected herein to be reasonable in light of the information available to them at this time, the actual outcome may be materially different owing to factors beyond the Group’s control or within the Group’s control where, for example, the Group decides on a change of plan or strategy. Click here for full document
Nigeria's Ascendant Oil Industry Faces Host of Pitfalls
Nigeria has decisively reclaimed the mantle of Africa's top oil producer, with rising output and crude prices spurring growth in the continent's most populous country. But the same industry driving the economy—oil—faces a host of challenges. In the next month, Nigeria's national assembly is expected to approve energy legislation that U.S. and European oil executives warn could curtail investment. The presidential election early next year may reignite fresh violence in the Niger Delta, the West African country's main oil region, where Royal Dutch Shell says its pipeline was attacked recently.
REPORT OF THE ELECTORAL REFORMS COMMITTEE SUBMITTED TO THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION OF THE REPUBLIC OF GHANA
We, members of the Electoral Reforms Committee wish to thank the almighty God for the strength, health and travelling mercies granted us throughout our various meetings, discussions and retreat sessions held outside Accra in executing our mandate as spelt out in our Terms of Reference. We thank the Chairman and Members of the Electoral Commission for giving us the opportunity to serve mother Ghana. To Mr Gabriel Pwamang the consultant to the Committee, we say: “...we are grateful to you for your assistance and for bringing your competence, expertise and legal acumen to bear on the work of the Committee.” Read more >>>
Structural Transformation of Ghana’s Economy
When approached by friends to give a presentation on Ghana, the initial idea was to shed light on the much heralded status of Ghana, joining the exclusive club of oil producers and what would be the development prospects for the country. However, realizing that Ghana being a developing country, perhaps it would be a better idea to present a broader picture of the development challenges facing the country, including how prudent the new oil revenue will be managed.
Africa’s tax systems: progress, but what is the next generation of reforms?
Taxation is zipping up the development agenda, but the discussion is often focussed on international aspects such as tax havens or the Robin Hood Tax. Both very important, but arguably, even more important is what happens domestically – are developing country tax systems regressive or progressive? Are they raising enough cash to fund state services? Are they efficient and free of corruption? This absolutely magisterial overview of the state of tax systems in Africa comes from Mick Moore (right), who runs the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD). It was first published by the Africa Research Institute. Anglophone countries have led the way in reforming tax administration in Africa, considerably more so than their francophone peers. The reasons for this are numerous. Networks of international tax specialists are based mainly in English-speaking countries. Many of the modern systems that promote best practice within tax authorities were developed in anglophone countries, especially Australia. International donors, and particularly the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), have directly and indirectly promoted a lot of reform of national tax authorities. In fact, this has been one of the success stories of British aid.
Biometric Registration: The next step in Ghana’s Democratic Development . Some Troubling Questions for the Government.
Needless to say, Ghana has been the leading light in the West African sub-region since before the dawn of independence. Indeed our independence was, to be accurate, achieved in a bloodless manner – achieved more through ‘jaw jaw’ with the Colonialists than by force. Thus was established the abiding image that Ghanaians are a peace loving people, a democratic people. Other than President Nkrumah increasingly losing his respect for multiparty democracy which invited the 1966 coup d’etat, and subsequently other needless military interventions, including the Acheampong and Rawlings coups, our country has managed in 54 years of existence, four Republican Constitutions, the fourth of which we are currently enjoying.