Throw a dart at a map of Europe now and it takes expert aim to hit a country run by a left-of-center government, especially after Spain's Socialists were emphatically drubbed out of power over the weekend. Although the shift to the right began years ago in such heavyweights as France and Germany, it is now all but complete three years into the continent's grinding debt and economic crisis. Why?

When times get tough – when "the cows get thin" as the Spanish say – political experts say edgy voters seek comfort with conservatives.

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Egyptians are voting in the opening stage of the first elections since former President Hosni Mubarak was toppled in February. As dawn broke, people were already queuing to cast their ballots outside polling stations in the capital, Cairo. But protesters who want the vote to be postponed still occupy Tahrir Square.

The head of the country's military council, which took over after Mr Mubarak was unseated, has said the country is "at a crossroads".

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Polls have opened for the Democratic Republic of Congo's presidential elections, after a run-up marred by violence and logistical delays. The head of the electoral commission said 99% of polling stations were ready and voting would go ahead as planned. At least three people were killed on Saturday, leading to a police ban on final campaign rallies.

It is the second presidential poll in DR Congo since the end of 1996-2003 wars which left four million dead.

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The theory of evolution by Charles Darwin teaches us about natural selection—i.e. survival of the fitters. We can survive as a nation when we have established a strong and solid educational system. It is a solid educational system that can deliver the country from abject poverty to economic freedom.

It is a shame to witness the way we address issues of education in the country. It appears populism and political showdown have been the rationale behind addressing educational issues in the country instead of allowing ourselves to be informed by evidence on the ground.

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Other Stories

32 Questions for Waterville
I am not a journalist. I was not present at the Waterville press conference. I don’t know if any questions were allowed, and if so whether any were asked. But I have read news stories of the press statement and heard snippets on radio. But these are questions that I would have asked if I had had the privilege of being present at the press conference. Yes, I know that it would not have been feasible to ask 32 questions, but here they are any way. Maybe, these are questions that the Police have asked, or should be asking Waterville.
Some Thoughts From Gabby On The Election Petition
The respondents in Ghana’s presidential election petition are, in short, saying, “Yes, we admit there were irregularities, but, whatever they are, whether over-voting, unknown polling stations or voting without biometric verification, they must be seen as nothing more than clerical, administrative or transpositional errors which must not affect votes cast by Ghanaians.”
Kenya election: 'Tech hub' hopes take polling day blow
On polling day it was the biometric voter-identification kits that failed. Then, about 36 hours into the counting process, the electronic transmission system shuddered to a halt. This election will be remembered as the poll where paper trumped digital.
Ghana’s Misery Index: Tracking Ghana’s 8 year decline in facts and figures
The past eight years have been a disaster for the people of Ghana. Governance standards have slipped and the economy has struggled, making life more difficult for every Ghanaian. Our country, once held up as the gold standard, has fallen markedly behind our peers.
Frank Agyakum: Encounter with BNI fruitful
Ex- Deputy Minister of information under the Kufuor administration has described as fruitful discussion between him and the Bureau of National Investigations.Mr. Frank Agyakum was invited to answer questions pertaining to the award of contract for the renovation of offices within his ministry.
Petroleum price subsidy unavoidable but who pays for it?
The debate over petroleum subsidy often evokes emotions, accusations and counter accusations. The latest withdrawal of subsidies on petroleum products in Ghana is not different. Predictably, petroleum politics have always led to political tensions and in some cases political instability. But the reality is that international crude oil prices, a major determinant of petroleum product prices is out of the control of importing countries. The Governments of these countries must therefore formulate policies including sustainable subsidy schemes that address market objectives without compromising political and social stability.
Ghana's Electoral Commission (EC) has remained mum despite growing anger over its handling of the December 7 presidential and parliamentary elections. The opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) on December 14 ordered its elections agents to boycott meetings organised by the EC claiming they were an attempt to cover up for electoral fraud.
Letter from NPP Chairman to EC Boss
We refer you to our previous correspondence on the need to get IPAC convened and deliberating on matters regarding the forthcoming Biometric Voter Registration (BVR) exercise and other issues pertaining to the 2012 general elections. Our call for specific information and material to enable us convince ourselves that the “tender process” leading to the procurement of equipment and materials is credible has fallen on, sadly, deaf ears. Click here for full details of letter
Akufo-Addo jabs Mahama over unemployment
The flagbearer of the New Patriotic Party says the government’s record on job creation over the last four years is not the least but impressive. Nana Akufo-Addo said the president and his team of ministers by announcing phantom jobs only add insult to injury of the many unemployed youth who are desperately looking for jobs.
John Mahama defends all-die-be-die in his book and yet condemns Akufo-Addo
In his book, ‘My First Coup D’etat’, President John Dramani Mahama concludes in the last paragraph, “All the decisions I have made in my life were regularly plagued with doubt. It can be challenging to sustain that feeling of hope or the belief that things will turn out for the best. Again and again, I have felt like that boy Dramani, on the bicycle going downhill fast, without any brakes and not knowing which way to turn.” He speaks of his father, a man of royal lineage, a former minister of state and a well-to-do capitalist, having six cars, the best house and providing for all of young Dramani’s needs, including cash to go to the disco.