Civil unrest in the aftermath of Kenya’s 2007 elections prompted the government of Kenya to completely overhaul its system of managing elections. The IIEC was formed to replace the previous Electoral Commission of Kenya and charged with the mission to institutionalize sustainable electoral processes that would guarantee fair elections.

The mandate of the IIEC covered all aspects of implementing elections including reform of the electoral process; conducting a fresh registration of all Kenyan voters to create a completely new voter register; developing a modern system for collection, collation, transmission and tallying of electoral data and promoting voter education.


The paper problematises the issues of democracy and good governance in Africa and analyses their future prospects especially in the 21st century. Liberal democracy and good governance, beside market reforms are the new puzzle words on the global agenda. Indeed, the three issues appear to be organically linked in the present context, with the hegemony of the liberal capitalist ideology in the international arena.

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The voting season is here once again. Between 2010 and 2012, voters in 10 out of the 11 Great Horn of East Africa (GHEA) countries will go to the polls. The only place where the election train will not stop is Eritrea where elections have been postponed indefinitely since 2001.

Who is riding the election train? Will it arrive at a place of increased citizen engagement in the development process? Will it lead to political and economic maturity? Or will the region end up with heightened conflict and polarized polities?

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The clamor for democracy all over the globe is not accidental. Those who go about such business of agitating for democratization are convinced that no society truly desirous of development can ignore democracy. The democratic experiences of the developed countries of the world lend credence to the truth of this claim. However, the reverse seems to be the case in many of the third world countries where there has been a huge golf between the anticipated gains of democracy and the reality on ground.

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Other Stories

Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo and the New Patriotic Party have added their voices to the growing calls on Laurent Gbagbo to quit and have criticised the unwillingness of the Mills-Mahama government to adopt a firm and decisive position against his illegal government. The NPP and Nana Addo are disappointed by the mixed signals from the Mills Administration and argue that once ECOWAS and the AU have spoken so unequivocally, Ghana which stands to lose more in the event of conflict should be more assertive in mounting pressure and isolating Gbagbo.
The modern state of Ghana was formed in 1957 from several territorial units administered under British colonial authority. These included the Gold Coast Colony, the traditional state of Ashanti, the Northern Territories Protectorate, and the Trust Territory of British Togo land. Early nationalist movements were active primarily within the Gold Coast Colony, which had achieved some measure of indigenous participation in governmental organs by 1946. Prominent in the movement for self-government was J.B. Danquah, instrumental in the founding of the United Gold Coast Convention (UGCC) in 1946 and Kwame Nkrumah, who formed the Convention People's Party (CPP) two years later.
IMANI Alert: Parliament SHOULD NOT Approve Shady Housing Deal
Upon reviewing the ‘order paper’ laid before the current session of Parliament on the 16th of August 2012, IMANI has concluded that item F(II) on the order paper should not have advanced from committee level in the first place much less laid before the full House. Item F (II) – Report of the Joint Committee on Finance and Works & Housing
Ghana loses $480m in oil revenue
An analysis of the petroleum receipts and distribution report, for the period ending 30th September 2011, published by the Dr Kwabena Dufuor on the 21st of November 2011 reveals that Ghana lost a total amount of $479,317,303.30 under the Royalty Tax System it has adopted.
GNPC Confuses Ghanaians About Abnormal Jubilee Costs
Rather uncharacteristic of the secretive organisation, the Ghana National Petroleum Corporation (GNPC) finally issued a press statement to respond to concerns raised by civil society about Ghana’s underperforming oil industry. While the GNPC is to be commended for its increasing responsiveness and transparency, its grudging tone detracted somewhat from its attempt at responding to its critics and stakeholders.
Ghana's Electoral Commission (EC) has remained mum despite growing anger over its handling of the December 7 presidential and parliamentary elections. The opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) on December 14 ordered its elections agents to boycott meetings organised by the EC claiming they were an attempt to cover up for electoral fraud.
Hold elections in November - Final report recommends
The Constitution Review Commission (CRC) has recommended that the presidential and parliamentary elections be conducted in November in subsequent election years after 2012 to facilitate smooth transitional processes. The commission further proposed the expunging of the indemnity clauses of the 1992 Constitution which provide coup makers immunity from prosecution.
DI Calls for Transparency in Petroleum Pricing Formula
The National Petroleum Authority (NPA) has announced a review of the petroleum price build-up (i.e. the formula used to determine the pricing ofpetroleum products). In this review the NPA informs the public that it has decided to increase the Bulk Oil Storage and Transportation (BOST) margin by 50 percent and the Marketers margin by 15 percent. At the same time the NPA also decided to reduce the ex-refinery price of petroleum products by 2 percent, with the net effect being a no change in prices at the pump. The Danquah Institute is calling on the NPA to come out and explain to Ghanaians what exactly is going on.
What Does the Reshuffle Mean for Developing Countries?
As the dust starts to settle on David Cameron's reshuffle Justine Greening will be starting to make Andrew Mitchell's old office at the Department for International Development (DFID) her own. She may be disappointed at losing her Transport brief, but those of us in the international development community are hopeful that she will soon see all the opportunities available in her new post. In particular, she has the chance to build on the UK's leadership on aid and to go down in the history books as a real leader on one of the big challenges of our time - that of fixing a situation where one in seven people are going to bed hungry despite there being enough food in the world for everyone.
Press Release: Monetary Policy Committee - September 2013
Members of the Press, let me once again welcome you to the press briefing on the MPC’s assessment of economic developments over the past eight months of the year, the outlook and the positioning of the policy rate.