The theory of evolution by Charles Darwin teaches us about natural selection—i.e. survival of the fitters. We can survive as a nation when we have established a strong and solid educational system. It is a solid educational system that can deliver the country from abject poverty to economic freedom.

It is a shame to witness the way we address issues of education in the country. It appears populism and political showdown have been the rationale behind addressing educational issues in the country instead of allowing ourselves to be informed by evidence on the ground.

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Budgets have become annual rituals and have defined the directions of the economy. It therefore does not evoke the level of interests it did in the past. However, the last two Budget Statements of the Government of Ghana have been significant for two reasons.

First, the introduction of oil revenues to the budget has raised expectations of Ghanaians for improvement in their living conditions and whether oil could provide that boost is a function of its management which the Budget has responsibility for.

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It features Nana Akufo-Addo, John Atta Mills, Jerry Rawlings, John Kufuor, Afari-Gyan, Kwesi Pratt, Hannah Tetteh, Rojo Mettle-Nunoo and Kwabena Agyepong, among others, and it has received great reviews across the globe, with the Los Angeles Times describing the documentary feature film as “the gripping examination of Ghana's 2008 presidential contest on display.”

It is a movie, which is likely to reignite the kind of sensation that gripped the nation after the cable releases from Wikileaks.

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2011 saw dramatic changes in Africa’s governance landscape. Unprecedented popular demonstrations in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya led to the overturning of a century of autocratic rule in North Africa.These protests, demanding greater political freedom, economic opportunity, and an end to systemic corruption, have resonated deeply across Africa, sparking calls for change throughout the continent.

Already home to more of the world’s democratizing states than any other region, even modest reverberations from the Arab Spring on Africa’s democratic trajectory will have implications for global governance norms, stability, and development.

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Other Stories

Report on the Presidential Election Petition in Ghana
The international community, generally, endorsed Ghana’s 2012 elections as “free and fair.” Ghana, the continent’s star of democracy, had done it once again for Africa. John Mahama, the declared winner, was duly sworn in without any violent protests on January 7, 2013. But, the country’s biggest opposition party filed a petition in Ghana’s supreme court, (the first of its kind in the country’s history), challenging the presidential results. Click here for full report
Dr Bawumia is Special Guest of Honour at DI Election Petition Symposium
“Did a majority of the court say over-voting did not matter? Did the Court say it was ok to vote without biometric verification? Did the Court really ignore an entrenched constitutional provision? Have the public being helped to understand the decision and what it means for 2016 and other future elections?” These and many more will be answered tomorrow at the National Theatre where the Danquah Institute’s symposium on the Presidential Election Petition judgement takes place.
A ruling not in the supreme interest of the nation
In a 5-4 ruling, the nine-panel Justices of Ghana’s Supreme Court on August 29 dismissed the petition filed by the NPP, challenging the validity of the Dec 7, 2012 presidential election won by the current president, John Mahama. Nana Akuffo-Addo, the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) challenger and petitioner called the president to concede defeat and congratulated him. He also called on his supporters to accept the verdict, though he disagreed with it, and later announced that he was going to take some time off politics to rest.
Enough of the Rhetorics: Ghanaians Need Sustainable Solutions To The Energy Crisis.
The frustrations of Ghanaians keep growing by the day at the inability of elected officials to show leadership in the handling of the energy crisis that currently engulfs the entire space of Ghana. From children and schools that need light for their studies at night, the hospital laboratories and theatres needing reliable power to save lives, the cottage and large scale factories in the villages and cities respectively that need reliable and affordable power to sustainably remain competitive with the global trends, Ghanaians are simply tired of the regular excuses and description of age old problems by policy makers without actions to resolving them. And the Danquah Institute fully identifies with the plight of these ordinary Ghanaians, who have to continuously bear with this unbearable circumstance without the benefit of any reasonable hope of a lasting solution to the current energy crisis situation from its elected leaders, enabled by their mandate to solve these problems on their behalf.
Putting our Teachers First - A Speech by Nana Akufo-Addo
I thank the organisers of this programme, executives of the Tertiary Education Students Confederacy (TESCON) of the NPP of both the Institute of Professional Studies (IPS) and the Accra College of Education, for the opportunity to speak to you this afternoon. I congratulate the outgone executives of IPS TESCON for their service, and commend the new ones for their offer of service. I am happy that, today, we are inaugurating formally the TESCON branch of the Accra College of Education. Click here for full speech
Responses To The 2013 Budget Statement
This budget statement came at a time when Ghanaians are in darkness, when water shortages are widespread, where unemployment is rife, and where general cost of living is rising. The budget statement should have addressed these challenges head on, but it didn’t. Ghana’s total debt is up from GHC9.5 billion in January 2009 to GHC33.5 billion now. Additionally, the NDC government has crude oil proceeds which its predecessor governments did not have. Additionally again, the NDC government has been getting windfall benefit from the exports of gold, cocoa and crude oil because of the near-record high levels. But what do we have to show for it all?
Structural Transformation of Ghana’s Economy
When approached by friends to give a presentation on Ghana, the initial idea was to shed light on the much heralded status of Ghana, joining the exclusive club of oil producers and what would be the development prospects for the country. However, realizing that Ghana being a developing country, perhaps it would be a better idea to present a broader picture of the development challenges facing the country, including how prudent the new oil revenue will be managed.
AU to unveil single African SIM card
Jan 28, 2011, PANA-- The African Union (AU) has unveiled plans for a single standardised SIM card for all African mobile phone operators in an effort to save millions of subscribers the extra cost and register the dot African domain name, senior officials said on Thursday. AU Commissioner for Infrastructure and Energy, Elham Ibrahim, said a study on the introduction of a single African SIM card has been underway and ‘is expected to be completed within a month’.The Commission would then hold a validation workshop with the key industry players in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to agree on the technical details needed to have the mobile phone operators accept the use of a single African SIM card, which it hopes would reduce the cost of roaming phone services.
Akufo-Addo offers Transformational Leadership to Build a New, Industrial Economy
Ghana’s main opposition party, the New Patriotic Party, is preparing to launch its 2012 Manifesto on Saturday, August 25. But, before then, The New Statesman can reveal, exclusively, that the document lays out a detailed programme on how to transform Ghana, under “an action-oriented, transformational leader”. The NPP believes the National Democratic Congress has failed and must be changed for hope and confidence to be restored in order to move Ghana forward.
Ghana seeks 40-year plan binding successive governments
Ghana's national development planning commission has begun preparations for developing a 40-year plan that seeks to outdo political, ethnic and geographical aspirations of the country, and to bind successive political leaders to following its implementation.