It features Nana Akufo-Addo, John Atta Mills, Jerry Rawlings, John Kufuor, Afari-Gyan, Kwesi Pratt, Hannah Tetteh, Rojo Mettle-Nunoo and Kwabena Agyepong, among others, and it has received great reviews across the globe, with the Los Angeles Times describing the documentary feature film as “the gripping examination of Ghana's 2008 presidential contest on display.”

It is a movie, which is likely to reignite the kind of sensation that gripped the nation after the cable releases from Wikileaks.

Read more...

2011 saw dramatic changes in Africa’s governance landscape. Unprecedented popular demonstrations in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya led to the overturning of a century of autocratic rule in North Africa.These protests, demanding greater political freedom, economic opportunity, and an end to systemic corruption, have resonated deeply across Africa, sparking calls for change throughout the continent.

Already home to more of the world’s democratizing states than any other region, even modest reverberations from the Arab Spring on Africa’s democratic trajectory will have implications for global governance norms, stability, and development.

Click here for report

Budgets have become annual rituals and have defined the directions of the economy. It therefore does not evoke the level of interests it did in the past. However, the last two Budget Statements of the Government of Ghana have been significant for two reasons.

First, the introduction of oil revenues to the budget has raised expectations of Ghanaians for improvement in their living conditions and whether oil could provide that boost is a function of its management which the Budget has responsibility for.

Click here for full article

In theory, parliaments are one of the key institutions of democracy, playing an important role in terms of legislation, oversight and representation. Regrettably, in many developing countries – as well as in many developed countries – parliaments are weak, ineffective and marginalised.

Parliamentary strengthening aims to enhance the effectiveness of parliaments through institutional development, through building the capacity of parliamentary staff, MPs and committees, and through putting in place the nuts and bolts of infrastructure and equipment

Click here for report

Other Stories

Ghana seeks 40-year plan binding successive governments
Ghana's national development planning commission has begun preparations for developing a 40-year plan that seeks to outdo political, ethnic and geographical aspirations of the country, and to bind successive political leaders to following its implementation.
Rawlings has a point, the growth in corruption is a major election issue, so is Ghana’s GH¢28.3BN public debt
Former President Jerry john Rawlings has once again injected some excitement into the December elections with the issues he raised in his recent meeting with members of the Volta Regional House of Chiefs. In our view, he was sincere about the issues he raised and the angles he took. The ruling National Democratic Congress was, until July 24, going into a general election with a leader who was, understandably, very unwell. Now, in President John Dramani Mahama, they have a leader who has, indeed, added “a spark to the governing party…
Ghana: Assessing Risks to Stability
Ghana's prospects for long-term stability are being undermined by important structural weaknesses. the political system is highly centralised, the executive is excessively powerful, and patronage politics is corroding public institutions. Social pressures are building due to the slow decline of the country's agricultural sector and its inability to provide jobs for its growing workforce. In the next 5 to 10 years, the main threats to Ghanaian stability will stem from the social and macroeconomic impact of its new oil export sector, the influence of drug trafficking on its political system, and youth unemployment. more>>>
Petitioners' comments on draft KPMG report
We act for the Petitioners in the presidential election petition, Writ No. J6/1/2013. We have examined your draft addressed to the Judicial Service of Ghana and dated June, 2013 together with four (4) volumes of annexures thereto and submit the following observations thereon: Click here for petitioners' comments
Prez Mahama, please tell your surrogates to leave me alone for I’m but a simple pastor – Mensa Otabil
The General Overseer of the International Central Gospel Church, Pastor Mensa Otabil has responded in clearest terms yet to what he calls evil attempts to expose him to public ridicule “and the running harassment against my integrity.”He said the doctoring and manipulation of his sermons over the years to give them political twists was defamatory, unethical, criminal, malicious and evil.
In a couple of weeks time fuel prices will go up, the PURC may announce new utility prices and with no immediate hope of processing Ghana’s wet gas into fuel for electricity, the bills are likely to go up, as well. Parents, many of them unemployed, may have to find money from any means necessary to pay for their kids’ second term fees. Poverty, unemployment, road traffic, personal insecurity and all the old ills of our impoverished society remain either unresolved or worsening. But, forget about the traffic to buy LPG gas, the traffic to work and back, the traffic to fill job vacancies, the traffic, generally, to getting anything fixed or done in Ghana. The one traffic that appears to excite media and political attention is drug trafficking.
The Deficit In Parliamentary Oversight In The Fight Against Corruption by HON. OSEI-KYEI MENSAH-BUNSO
Before we can proceed to identify the oversight responsibility of Parliament in a democracy, it is imperative to be clear about what our own understanding of ‘democracy’ is. As a concept, democracy is innate and almost universally accepted as both ideal and a goal. It is foundationed on shared values of humanity in spite of cultural, social, political and economic differences which may exist between and among people. The pivotal object of democracy is to protect and promote the fundamental rights of the individual to achieve social justice, facilitate social and economic development of the communities, strengthen the cohesion of society and engender a congenial environment for sustainable peace, domestically and internationally.
Ghana's economic forecast revised downwards
The latest economic report on Ghana by the reputable UK-based companiesandmarkets.com has revised downwards expectations on economic growth. This is primarily driven by the growing likelihood that oil production will begin in the early part of 2011 and not the last quarter of this year as earlier expected. However, according to the Business Forecast Report, Ghana proved robust amid the external headwinds of 2009, boding well for economic expansion going forward. Real GDP growth is estimated to have been 4.7% in 2009 and the report sees it accelerating into double digits by 2011. The onset of domestic oil production will play a major part in this story. Not only will it boost growth, it should also lead to remarkable reductions in the deficits on the current account and fiscal account. In fact, it is expected that both accounts will flip into surplus over the coming years.
US/China: Obama Should Raise Human Rights in China
President Barack Obama bids farewell to Chinese Ministers in the White House after the first US-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue on July 28, 2009. © 2009 Official White House Photo / Pete Souza Related Materials: Letter to President Obama Ahead of his Visit to China President Obama has spoken forcefully about the importance of defending human rights globally in speeches in Egypt, Ghana, Turkey, and at the United Nations. The test now is whether he will do so in a country where the government remains profoundly hostile to these concepts.
China in Africa: Beware the dragon bearing gifts
While China is investing billions in Africa, it is also busily extracting its precious natural resources. Many are now questioning if the east's involvement in Africa will be any more beneficial than the west's has been. It'is a sweltering October afternoon 20 kilometres to the west of the booming mining town of Karonga in northern Malawi. The sun is beating down on vast swathes of dusty, arid land, parched by months without rain. Teams of Chinese labourers from the China Road and Bridge Corporation are working on a large construction project to build a road from Karonga to the remote town of Chitipa.