The present number of unanticipated events and further deterioration of the global economic environment could have substantial spillovers to the Ghanaian economy;

Preliminary results from WAMI’s half year surveillance report indicates that the overall economic performance in the WAMZ remained strong with real GDP expected to expand by 8.0 per cent in 2011, compared to 7.7 per cent in 2010.

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Madam Speaker, I beg to move that this honourable House approves the Financial Policy of the Government of Ghana for the year ending 31st December, 2012. Madam Speaker, in doing so, I humbly stand before you to present the fourth Budget Statement and Economic Policy on behalf of the President, His Excellency, Prof. John Evans Atta Mills in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution.

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Madam Speaker, I beg to move that this august House approves the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the year ending 31st December, 2012.

Today, I humbly stand before you to present the fourth Budget Statement and Economic Policy on behalf of the President, His Excellency, Prof. John Evans Atta Mills in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution.

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Electronic democracy (e-democracy) is a necessity in this era of computers and information technology. Electronic election (e-election) is one of the most important applications of e-democracy, because of the importance of the voters’ privacy and the possibility of frauds. Electronic voting (e-voting) is the most significant part of e-election, which refers to the use of computers or computerised voting equipment to cast ballots in an election.

Due to the rapid growth of computer technologies and advances in cryptographic techniques, e-voting is now an applicable alternative for many non-governmental elections. However, security demands become higher when voting takes place in the political arena.

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Other Stories

The election petition proceedings were broadcast live for all to follow. The judgment though, has still raised several questions:· "Did a majority of the court say over-voting does not matter?· What is the difference between over-voting and ballot stuffing?· Did the court really ignore an entrenched provision of the 1992 Constitution?· Did the court say voting without biometric verification was okay?"All these and a host of other questions will be answered, at a symposium to be held at the National Theatre, tomorrow, Wednesday, September 25th from 5:30pm. Live on www.danquahinstitute.org
Providing Homes for the People - How Property-Owning Democracy was Bastardised
March 2009 is ending with agitation over Ga lands and the threat of a similar agitation in the Western Region. In my view all this could have been effectively avoided or neutralised if only the New Patriotic Party was steadfast and more radical in its realisation of the dream of a property-owning democracy.In April 4, 2007, I wrote an article explaining ‘Development in Freedom’ – the slogan of the NPP –– the party of proponents of free market and developmentalism like Danquah, Busia and Dombo That article argues, fundamental to the doctrine of Danquah-Busiaism is the principle that freedom is the primary end as well as the active means to development.
Subsidiary Agreement - Gas Infrastructure Project
The Government of the People's Republic of China and the Government of the Republic of Ghana are resolved to expand bilateral relations through harmonious, sustainable and win-win economic co-operation measures, in line with the principles adopted for the Forum on China-Africa Co-operation. The Lender seeks to apply its financial support as a means to enhance bilateral economic and trade relations between China and Ghana by extending commercial loans to the Borrower, to be applied by the Borrower on the terms and conditions set out in this Agreement. Click here for subsidiary agreement
Tullow Oil plc - Half year results
This presentation contains certain forward-looking statements that are subject to the usual risk factors and uncertainties associated with the oil and gas exploration and production business. Whilst Tullow believes the expectations reflected herein to be reasonable in light of the information available to them at this time, the actual outcome may be materially different owing to factors beyond the Group’s control or within the Group’s control where, for example, the Group decides on a change of plan or strategy. Click here for full document
This short overview report presents the main findings and recommendations of a larger study, prepared in early 2013, that is to be released shortly. We believe that it will help bring about policies and decisions that will ensure that Ghana’s emergence as a middle-income economy is not held back by the energy sector, as at present. We recommend that Government make a concerted effort to ‘think big’ and provide more direct and proactive leadership to the energy sector, given its centrality to boosting economic growth. The report was prepared during a period of electricity shortages and rolling power blackouts. The current power shortfall is particularly serious for two reasons: the frequency of these episodes is increasing – the previous one was just 5 years ago – and the economic damage inflicted is greater, because Ghana’s economy has evolved to become ever more dependent on reliable electricity supply. This review identifies three themes that are common to Ghana’s power and petroleum sectors.
Akufo-Addo to address inaugural Liberty Lecture
The Danquah Institute will on Wednesday, August 31, 2012 hold its inaugural annual liberty lecture with the 2012 Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo delivering a paper on the theme “Building a Society of Opportunities in Ghana”. The lecture takes place at the Ghana College of Physicians and Surgeons at 6:30pm, with Nana Akufo-Addo set to deliver his speech at 7pm.
Accountability and transparency initiatives hav e taken democratisation, governance, aid and development circles by storm since the turn of th e century. Many actors involved with them – as donors, funders, programme managers, implementers and researchers – are now keen to know more about what these initiatives are achieving. This paper arises from a review of the impact and effectiveness of transparency and accountability initiatives which gathered and analysed existing evidence, discussed how it could be improved, and evaluated how impact and effectiveness could be enhanced. This paper takes the discussion further, by delving into what lies behind the methodological and evaluative debates currently surrounding governance and accountability work. It illustrates how choices about methods are made in the cont ext of impact assessment designs driven by different objectives and different ideological and epistemological underpinnings. We argue that these differences are articulated as methodological debates, obscuring vital issues underlying accountability work, which are about power and politics, not methodological technicalities.
Democracy at a standstill: A report from The Economist Intelligence Unit
This is the fifth edition of the Economist Intelligence Unit’s Democracy index. It reflects the situation at the end of 2012. In 2012 global democracy was at a standstill in the sense that there was neither significant progress nor regression in democracy in that year. Average regional scores in 2012 were very similar to scores in 2011. The first edition of the index, published in The Economist’s The World in 2007, measured the state of democracy in September 2006; the second edition covered the situation towards the end of 2008; the third as of November 2010 and the fourth at the end of 2011. The index provides a snapshot of the state of democracy worldwide for 165 independent states and two territories—this covers almost the entire population of the world and the vast majority of the world’s states (micro states are excluded). The Democracy index is based on five categories: electoral process and pluralism; civil liberties; the functioning of government; political participation; and political culture. Countries are placed within one of four types of regimes: full democracies; flawed democracies; hybrid regimes; and authoritarian regimes. Full Document
Danquah Institute To Chief Justice:  Televise NPP'S Historic Legal Case
Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, the Executive Director of research, policy and governance think tank, Danquah Institute, today appealed to Chief Justice, Georgina Theodora Wood, who presides on all cases before the Supreme Court, to allow television cameras to broadcast all proceedings of the upcoming law suit by the New Patriotic Party, which intends to prove that a manipulation of the actual election results by the Electoral Commission resulted in a faulty declaration of John Drahmani Mahama as the winner of the 2012 presidential election. He said, a live televised broadcast of such a historical case for our democracy, with its far-reaching implications for this and future elections, would reduce opportunities for some people to put a self-serving spin on the proceedings and decision of the court, with the intention of inciting undue negative reactions from an already divided nation.
Parliamentarians from around the world met in the Chamber of the Canadian House of Commons October 13–16, 2002, and formed the Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC). At this meeting, corruption was identified as the greatest threat to the democratic ideal of self-government, endangering representative institutions selected in free elections by a broadly enfranchised people. Corruption was not only seen as a threat to democracy but also perceived to undermine economic development, violate social justice, and destroy trust in state institutions. In addition, if most commentators were right, corruption is getting worse in many countries and becoming an increasingly widespread phenomenon.