The present number of unanticipated events and further deterioration of the global economic environment could have substantial spillovers to the Ghanaian economy;

Preliminary results from WAMI’s half year surveillance report indicates that the overall economic performance in the WAMZ remained strong with real GDP expected to expand by 8.0 per cent in 2011, compared to 7.7 per cent in 2010.

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Madam Speaker, I beg to move that this honourable House approves the Financial Policy of the Government of Ghana for the year ending 31st December, 2012. Madam Speaker, in doing so, I humbly stand before you to present the fourth Budget Statement and Economic Policy on behalf of the President, His Excellency, Prof. John Evans Atta Mills in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution.

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Madam Speaker, I beg to move that this august House approves the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the year ending 31st December, 2012.

Today, I humbly stand before you to present the fourth Budget Statement and Economic Policy on behalf of the President, His Excellency, Prof. John Evans Atta Mills in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution.

Click here for full budget statement

Electronic democracy (e-democracy) is a necessity in this era of computers and information technology. Electronic election (e-election) is one of the most important applications of e-democracy, because of the importance of the voters’ privacy and the possibility of frauds. Electronic voting (e-voting) is the most significant part of e-election, which refers to the use of computers or computerised voting equipment to cast ballots in an election.

Due to the rapid growth of computer technologies and advances in cryptographic techniques, e-voting is now an applicable alternative for many non-governmental elections. However, security demands become higher when voting takes place in the political arena.

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Other Stories

Danquah Institute To Chief Justice:  Televise NPP'S Historic Legal Case
Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, the Executive Director of research, policy and governance think tank, Danquah Institute, today appealed to Chief Justice, Georgina Theodora Wood, who presides on all cases before the Supreme Court, to allow television cameras to broadcast all proceedings of the upcoming law suit by the New Patriotic Party, which intends to prove that a manipulation of the actual election results by the Electoral Commission resulted in a faulty declaration of John Drahmani Mahama as the winner of the 2012 presidential election. He said, a live televised broadcast of such a historical case for our democracy, with its far-reaching implications for this and future elections, would reduce opportunities for some people to put a self-serving spin on the proceedings and decision of the court, with the intention of inciting undue negative reactions from an already divided nation.
Highlights of 2012 Budget Statement
The present number of unanticipated events and further deterioration of the global economic environment could have substantial spillovers to the Ghanaian economy; Preliminary results from WAMI’s half year surveillance report indicates that the overall economic performance in the WAMZ remained strong with real GDP expected to expand by 8.0 per cent in 2011, compared to 7.7 per cent in 2010. Click here for highlights
Letter from NPP Chairman to EC Boss
We refer you to our previous correspondence on the need to get IPAC convened and deliberating on matters regarding the forthcoming Biometric Voter Registration (BVR) exercise and other issues pertaining to the 2012 general elections. Our call for specific information and material to enable us convince ourselves that the “tender process” leading to the procurement of equipment and materials is credible has fallen on, sadly, deaf ears. Click here for full details of letter
Nkrumah's Celebration Renews Age-Old Debate
The declaration of September 21 as statutory public holiday in honour of Ghana’s first President, Osagyefo Dr Kwame Nkrumah, has renewed an age-old debate between adherents of the two dominant political traditions in the country regarding the appropriateness of celebrating Nkrumah as the sole founder of the nation.The debate was carried to the campus of the University of Ghana, Legon,Thursday, during which faithful of the Danquah/Busia tradition argued that it was better to honour all those who contributed to the cause of independence than just one person, while advocates of the Nkrumaist tradition justified the honour bestowed on Nkrumah because he stood tallest amongst the rest in the struggle for independence.
Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo and the New Patriotic Party have added their voices to the growing calls on Laurent Gbagbo to quit and have criticised the unwillingness of the Mills-Mahama government to adopt a firm and decisive position against his illegal government. The NPP and Nana Addo are disappointed by the mixed signals from the Mills Administration and argue that once ECOWAS and the AU have spoken so unequivocally, Ghana which stands to lose more in the event of conflict should be more assertive in mounting pressure and isolating Gbagbo.
Gabby: Ghana’s 2008 Election was Flawed
The Executive Director of the Danquah Institute has said that the 2008 general elections of Ghana had so many flaws and that he fears the country is not showing any serious interest in putting measures in place to avoid that in 2012. “Even though every vote was seemingly counted not every vote counted in the final analysis. And, if every vote counts then certainly not every vote was properly counted in 2008. Both parties must be blamed; but what are we doing now to cut out that cancer of electoral malpractices from our system for the future? We must wake up now, start thinking and working on it,” he urged all stakeholders.
Azikiwi's tribute to J.B Danquah
By the death of Joseph Boakye Danquah, the world has lost a valued ally in the crusade for human freedom and African has lost a great champion of fundamental human rights. It is not universally appreciated that Dr. Danquah was probably the first West African to obtain the doctorate degree in philosophy from a British University, When his dissertation on Akan Law and custom was accepted for the Ph.D. Degree by the University of London in 1927-28. As a journalist, Dr. Danquah was proprietor and editor of what is assumed to be the first daily newspaper in Ghana, which he christened Times of West Africa. This was in 1932 and under the pen-name of ?Zadig?, he maintained a column which he used to expose cant and criticize the hypocritical practices of his day.
If you ‘Woyomise’ the economy the cedi will depreciate- Bawumia
Dr Mahamadu Bawumia says pumping a lot of money into the economy for no work done is partly the reason for the depreciation of the country’s currency.Describing the phenomenon as "woyomisation of the economy" in reference to the payment of judgement debts to Alfred Woyome, Construction Pioneers and others, the NPP vice presidential candidate said the free fall of the country’s currency is an expression of the lack of confidence in the economy.
STRENGTHENING PARLIAMENT IS KEY TO FIGHTING CORRUPTION -Says Minority Leader
The Minority Leader in Parliament, Osei Kyei-Mensah-Bonsu, yesterday stated that strengthening parliament’s financial oversight responsibilities is critical to combating “the evil enterprise of corruption which has become cancerous in Ghana.” He further noted that corruption hurts the poor disproportionately, by diverting scarce funds intended for development, undermining government’s ability to provide such basic services as potable water, schools, shelter, clinics, toilet facilities, farming inputs to the populace and thus aggravating inequality and injustice and thereby discouraging foreign aid and investment.The Minority Leader made the observation when he delivered the 2013 Liberty Lecture at the Auditorium of the British Council on the theme: “The Deficit in Parliamentary Oversight in the Fight against Corruption.”
Looking back and forward: the world’s financial system
The financial system is the nerve centre of the modern economy. Banks pool the capital of savers and lend it to companies at longer maturities, allowing them to invest in new initiatives for continuous expansion. They provide cash machines, credit cards, debit cards and so on allowing the vast majority of commercial activities to take place. The capital market allows companies to raise capital at a reduced cost, enabling risk to be effectively managed. The financial freeze starting September 2008 was accompanied with a corresponding held up in all these commercial activities, plummeting national economies and the world economy at large into the biggest recession since the end of World War II. Recent economic reports across the world’s heavy economies suggest the world economy is steadily responding to growth. Britain is the latest to have announced its economy is officially out of recession. German and France were first to have recorded positive growth figures. America so far has been cautious about its figures but for the first time over a year the American economy has recorded an expansion. The message coming out so far is good taking into account the fact that the world economy came to near collapse.