In theory, parliaments are one of the key institutions of democracy, playing an important role in terms of legislation, oversight and representation. Regrettably, in many developing countries – as well as in many developed countries – parliaments are weak, ineffective and marginalised.

Parliamentary strengthening aims to enhance the effectiveness of parliaments through institutional development, through building the capacity of parliamentary staff, MPs and committees, and through putting in place the nuts and bolts of infrastructure and equipment

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Madam Speaker, I beg to move that this august House approves the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the year ending 31st December, 2012.

Today, I humbly stand before you to present the fourth Budget Statement and Economic Policy on behalf of the President, His Excellency, Prof. John Evans Atta Mills in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution.

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The present number of unanticipated events and further deterioration of the global economic environment could have substantial spillovers to the Ghanaian economy;

Preliminary results from WAMI’s half year surveillance report indicates that the overall economic performance in the WAMZ remained strong with real GDP expected to expand by 8.0 per cent in 2011, compared to 7.7 per cent in 2010.

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Madam Speaker, I beg to move that this honourable House approves the Financial Policy of the Government of Ghana for the year ending 31st December, 2012. Madam Speaker, in doing so, I humbly stand before you to present the fourth Budget Statement and Economic Policy on behalf of the President, His Excellency, Prof. John Evans Atta Mills in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution.

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