Civil unrest in the aftermath of Kenya’s 2007 elections prompted the government of Kenya to completely overhaul its system of managing elections. The IIEC was formed to replace the previous Electoral Commission of Kenya and charged with the mission to institutionalize sustainable electoral processes that would guarantee fair elections.

The mandate of the IIEC covered all aspects of implementing elections including reform of the electoral process; conducting a fresh registration of all Kenyan voters to create a completely new voter register; developing a modern system for collection, collation, transmission and tallying of electoral data and promoting voter education.

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The paper problematises the issues of democracy and good governance in Africa and analyses their future prospects especially in the 21st century. Liberal democracy and good governance, beside market reforms are the new puzzle words on the global agenda. Indeed, the three issues appear to be organically linked in the present context, with the hegemony of the liberal capitalist ideology in the international arena.

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The voting season is here once again. Between 2010 and 2012, voters in 10 out of the 11 Great Horn of East Africa (GHEA) countries will go to the polls. The only place where the election train will not stop is Eritrea where elections have been postponed indefinitely since 2001.

Who is riding the election train? Will it arrive at a place of increased citizen engagement in the development process? Will it lead to political and economic maturity? Or will the region end up with heightened conflict and polarized polities?

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The clamor for democracy all over the globe is not accidental. Those who go about such business of agitating for democratization are convinced that no society truly desirous of development can ignore democracy. The democratic experiences of the developed countries of the world lend credence to the truth of this claim. However, the reverse seems to be the case in many of the third world countries where there has been a huge golf between the anticipated gains of democracy and the reality on ground.

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Other Stories

Africa and the Arab Spring: A New Era of Democratic Expectations
2011 saw dramatic changes in Africa’s governance landscape. Unprecedented popular demonstrations in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya led to the overturning of a century of autocratic rule in North Africa.These protests, demanding greater political freedom, economic opportunity, and an end to systemic corruption, have resonated deeply across Africa, sparking calls for change throughout the continent. Already home to more of the world’s democratizing states than any other region, even modest reverberations from the Arab Spring on Africa’s democratic trajectory will have implications for global governance norms, stability, and development. Click here for report
Statement at the Conclusion of an IMF Mission to Ghana
A mission from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), led by Christina Daseking, visited Accra during May 16-29, 2012, to conduct discussions for the sixth and seventh review under the IMF’s Extended Credit Facility. The mission met with President John Evans Atta Mills, Finance Minister Kwabena Duffuor, Bank of Ghana Governor Kwesi Amissah-Arthur, other senior officials, members of the Economic Advisory Council, and representatives of the private sector and civil society.
Ghana gives up on $10bn housing deal with STX
Ghana is seeking "alternatives" to a 200,000-unit housing deal it struck with South Korean conglomerate STX Corp. after failed negotiations over the details, President John Atta Mills said on Monday.The deal, initially announced in 2009, was estimated to be worth $10 billion. "We have some difficulties with the STX project and as a president, I am eating a humble pie to say that we are looking for alternatives," Mills said at a press conference.
The Monetary Policy Committee - November 2013
You are welcome to this Press briefing. The Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) held its 58th meeting on November 25 to 27, 2013 to review the latest economic developments and the monetary policy stance. I present to you the outcome of the deliberations. The latest projections by the IMF indicate a pickup in the pace of global activity from 2.9 percent in 2013 to 3.6 percent in 2014, driven largely by the advanced economies with the impulse to global growth expected to come mainly from the United States against weaker prospects in emerging market economies.
2012 Supplementary Budget
Madam Speaker, it will be recalled that I had the honour on behalf of His Excellency, President John Evans Atta Mills in presenting the 2012 Budget Statement and Economic Policy of Government to this august House on 16th November, 2011, based on which an Appropriation Act was passed. It has become necessary for me to appear before this august House once again to present a Mid-Year Review of the performance of the economy and a Supplementary Estimate of Government in accordance with Article 179 (8) of the Constitution and Standing Order 143 of Parliament. Click here for supplementary budget statement Read highlights of the budget statement
E-voting handbook
E-voting refers to an election or referendum that involves the use of electronic means in at least the casting of the vote. The introduction of e-voting raises some of the same challenges as are faced when applying electronics to any other subject, for example e-government. Politicians or administrators may perhaps expect that a paper version of a certain service or process can simply be taken and put on the Internet. Unfortunately, the reality is more complex, and nowhere more so than with e-voting. Click here for full article
The Fallacies of J.B. Danquah's Heroic Legacy - A Comment by Prof. R Addo-Fening
Allow me space to comment on the above mentioned publication which appeared in the Ghanaian Lens of Tuesday 6 June 2006. I owe it to students of Ghanaian History, Okyeman and the Ghanaian public at large not to let it pass without comment. The writer, Dr, Kwame Botwe-Asamoah, Professor of African/African American History, University of Pittsburgh, takes a swipe at President Kuffuor and Okyenhene Amoatia Ofori Panin - the former, for describing the late Dr. J.B. Danquah as "the Prime Minister Ghana never had" during the commemoration of the 40th anniversary of this death in February 2005; the latter for suggesting that the University of Ghana named after Dr. Danquah. more >>>
Full 2012 Budget Statement
Madam Speaker, I beg to move that this august House approves the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the year ending 31st December, 2012. Today, I humbly stand before you to present the fourth Budget Statement and Economic Policy on behalf of the President, His Excellency, Prof. John Evans Atta Mills in accordance with article 179 of the 1992 Constitution. Click here for full budget statement
Gabby: Mills is luckiest President ever, yet he has failed
President John Evans Atta Mills has had a tremendous opportunity to have an unprecedented impact on the lives of Ghanaians because he has had more resources than any other government in the history of this nation but has failed to achieve that, says Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, Executive Director of the Danquah Institute. According to him, the Mills-administration inherited an economy with more resources that should have propelled him to institute life-changing projects to the benefit of the populace.
Accountability and transparency initiatives hav e taken democratisation, governance, aid and development circles by storm since the turn of th e century. Many actors involved with them – as donors, funders, programme managers, implementers and researchers – are now keen to know more about what these initiatives are achieving. This paper arises from a review of the impact and effectiveness of transparency and accountability initiatives which gathered and analysed existing evidence, discussed how it could be improved, and evaluated how impact and effectiveness could be enhanced. This paper takes the discussion further, by delving into what lies behind the methodological and evaluative debates currently surrounding governance and accountability work. It illustrates how choices about methods are made in the cont ext of impact assessment designs driven by different objectives and different ideological and epistemological underpinnings. We argue that these differences are articulated as methodological debates, obscuring vital issues underlying accountability work, which are about power and politics, not methodological technicalities.