The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results.

Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, warned against the pursuit of “white elephant projects.”


New oil, Chinese investment, stable government, highest growth in the world: Ghana is a new success story. But be careful with the exact figures.

While all countries revise their GDP numbers and other accounts, Ghana’s revision of the data takes some beating. The Q2 GDP figure was reported in September as 33.5 per cent. The new figure? 16.4 per cent, less than half. Other numbers given for individual sectors are even further reduced.


Wednesday, sounding rather frail, the absentee Minister of Health, gave interviews to say that no, he had not gone on leave to campaign in his constituency. He was only there to ‘interact’ as part of his medical leave. Joseph Yieleh Chireh was reacting to a report in the Chronicle that while patients were suffering under the doctors’ strike, the minister responsible was campaigning in his Wa West Constituency, Upper West Region.

The Chronicle said “Mr Yieleh Chireh was at the Dabu Electoral Area in the Upper West Region on Tuesday, holding meetings with NDC executives in the constituency, in a bid to retain him to contest the [parliamentary] elections” next year.


Voter registration is highly complex and is the single most expensive activity within the framework of elections. Voter registration is not just the technical implementation of an activity; it is a holistic political, administrative and practical process. The role of voter registration is especially important when it comes

to emerging democracies: it can make or break an election. The quality of the process and the product – that is, the voters’ roll – can determine the outcome of an election and consequently the stability of the democratic institutions in acountry.

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Accra, September 21, 2009 – Today, the World Bank Ghana Office joins the Government and people of Ghana in commemorating the 100th birthday of Osagyefo Dr. Kwame Nkrumah.The vision for a better future developed so eloquently by this great son of Africa still drives this nation’s work, and ours, today. His words of wisdom remain alive with meaning and urgency:
Thabo Mbeki letter to Jan Ping
Your Excellency,I have the honour to convey my compliments and to request your indulgence to spare some of your valuable time to consider the humble suggestions relating to Côte d’Ivoire as contained in this letter.Understandably, the efforts of the AU and ECOWAS to resolve the current Ivorian political crisis have focused on settling the issue of who should assume the Presidency of the country. read more >>>
Invitation from Danquah Institute - Public Lecture on International Corruption
The Danquah Institute has invited the world renowned international criminal law expert, John Hardy QC, to deliver two lectures on international corruption and money laundering next week. We are extending an invitation to you to attend these lectures which we consider as important to our national development efforts. The theme of the first lecture is: “PROTECTING GHANA AND GHANA’S EMERGING FINANCIAL OFFSHORE CENTRE STATUS FROM MONEY LAUNDERING”. Venue: BRITISH COUNCIL on TUESDAY, MARCH 9, at 9.30AM. more >>>
2010 Census results out April 30 - GSS
The final results of the 2010 Population and Housing Census are expected to be released on Monday, April 30, 2012, the Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) has indicated. Originally, the results were scheduled to be released on March 31, 2012 but some initial field challenges which impacted negatively on the data collection process have necessitated the rescheduling of the date for the release of the results.
Biometrics in Elections
This report is a result of a brief consultancy on behalf of IFES Georgia with financial support courtesy of USAID. The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author and should not be attributed to neither IFES nor USAID. The consultancy took place over four days in the period 25 to 28 January 2011 in Tbilisi, Georgia. Click here for full report
Mr President, it is the people that give second term, not the constitution- Nana Addo
Nana Akufo-Addo, the flagbearer of the New Patriotic Party, (NPP) is accusing the president of grossly misrepresenting the Constitution of Ghana by insinuating that the constitution gives every candidate two terms. Nana Akufo-Addo told Joy News that such a misrepresentation from no less a person than the president is worrying.
P/NDC supporters have one myth that they hold dear, to wit, J. A. Kuffuor packed the courts to secure the conviction of Tsatsu Tsikata. Not only is this mythical, it is equally claptrap and hooey. It is well known that Tsatsu was convicted by one judge, who incidentally was appointed by Chairman JJR long before JAK became President, Judge Henrietta Abban, who was maligned and harassed for just doing her job.
What Makes Countries Rich or Poor?
The fence that divides the city of Nogales is part of a natural experiment in organizing human societies. North of the fence lies the American city of Nogales, Arizona; south of it lies the Mexican city of Nogales, Sonora. On the American side, average income and life expectancy are higher, crime and corruption are lower, health and roads are better, and elections are more democratic. Yet the geographic environment is identical on both sides of the fence, and the ethnic makeup of the human population is similar. Read full article
Gabby: Mills is luckiest President ever, yet he has failed
President John Evans Atta Mills has had a tremendous opportunity to have an unprecedented impact on the lives of Ghanaians because he has had more resources than any other government in the history of this nation but has failed to achieve that, says Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, Executive Director of the Danquah Institute. According to him, the Mills-administration inherited an economy with more resources that should have propelled him to institute life-changing projects to the benefit of the populace.
A growing number of sub-Saharan African countries – South Africa, Tanzania, Kenya, Botswana, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, and more recently, Ghana – now require that the Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) card in a mobile phone be tied to the user’s name. The main reason: to combat crime. But I am afraid that with its narrow rationale and focus, this exercise misses the big picture; i.e., a golden opportunity to develop a good database that could become the building blocks for stronger institutions and economic transformation. Cross-country growth studies show that strong institutions are the surest bet out of this quagmire, a fact that has been echoed several times by Prince Kofi Amoabeng, CEO of UT Bank and arguably, the most-respected CEO in Ghana. When asked in a recent interview on how to reform the institutions, Mr. Amoabeng emphasized the role of information. “We have to go back to the basics. Information about the people, proper home and business addresses; proper identification make it possible to collect appropriate taxes that will fund projects,” he added. But developing good institutions, when powers that be benefit from its absence, is not going to be easy. Sure, a fixed-address system will help, but you only need to take one look at Accra, not to mention smaller towns/villages, to realize that street addressing remains a dream for now.