The voting season is here once again. Between 2010 and 2012, voters in 10 out of the 11 Great Horn of East Africa (GHEA) countries will go to the polls. The only place where the election train will not stop is Eritrea where elections have been postponed indefinitely since 2001.

Who is riding the election train? Will it arrive at a place of increased citizen engagement in the development process? Will it lead to political and economic maturity? Or will the region end up with heightened conflict and polarized polities?

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The clamor for democracy all over the globe is not accidental. Those who go about such business of agitating for democratization are convinced that no society truly desirous of development can ignore democracy. The democratic experiences of the developed countries of the world lend credence to the truth of this claim. However, the reverse seems to be the case in many of the third world countries where there has been a huge golf between the anticipated gains of democracy and the reality on ground.

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The paper problematises the issues of democracy and good governance in Africa and analyses their future prospects especially in the 21st century. Liberal democracy and good governance, beside market reforms are the new puzzle words on the global agenda. Indeed, the three issues appear to be organically linked in the present context, with the hegemony of the liberal capitalist ideology in the international arena.

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The Republic of Ghana benefits from strong GDP growth, strengthening oil production volumes, and a track record of political stability. However, it continues to suffer from weak fiscal management highlighted by a widening of the fiscal deficit in 2010 and increased supplier arrears.

We are therefore affirming our 'B/B' foreign- and local-currency sovereign credit ratings on the Republic of Ghana. The stable outlook balances our view of the country's strong growth prospects and track record of political stability against its weak payment culture and fiscal challenges.

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Other Stories

The promise to teachers, and soon to nurses, doctors and other civil servants of seeing a substantial increment in their take-home pay as promised by the Mills-Mahama led NDC administration seems to be little more than a pipedream. The Independence Day promise that ‘this Government will not shortchange teachers’ could be described as just another in the litany of broken promises. Documents and analysis made available to the New Statesman reveal that there is no extra money for the implementation of the Single Spine Salary Structure. In fact, the money made available to extend the SSSS to both education and health workers this year is nearly GH¢2 billion short. Thus to pretend to implement it and offer promises of allowances to keep aggrieved workers calm will only amount to shortchanging them.
President Mills’ executive judgment overruling the judgment of the Supreme Court is unconstitutional and against the founding principles of the NDC: By Martin A. B. K. Amidu
On the night of Thursday 24 May 2012 I read on ghanaweb.com/GhanaHome Page a story with the title ‘Government no longer selling ‘Jake Bungalow.”’ The story in its concluding paragraph ‘“described the acquisition as “immoral”’. I also read a statement attributed to the Forum for Governance and Justice (FGJ) in which my nephew and kinsman Dr. Appaak was alleged to have said: “the forum will study the docket and possibly seek redress .. The plaintiff – Okudzeto Ablakwa and Omane-Boamah have also indicated that they will push for review of the case.” Another newspaper on the same web on 24th May 2012 referred to the judgment as “Stinking Supreme Court Ruling ..” and concluded that: “We wish Justice Brobbey a happy retirement and may he live long to experience ….his actions.” I also read another newspaper with the title “Two “Jake Bungalow” Judges are NNP – Akume.
Justice Atuguba Weeps For Legal Aid In Ghana
Majority of Ghanaians are practi- cally denied access to the justice sys- tem because of dire economic needs, and many suspects languish in cells and jails, some as long as 10 years for lack of legal representation. This gloomy picture was painted by Supreme Court Justice William Atuguba, Chair of the Ghana’s Legal Aid Scheme in “A conversation of Access to Justice in Africa: The ex- perience of the Legal Aid Scheme in Ghana February 21 at the Fordham University School of Law, Manhat- tan New York. He conceded that he knew very little of the Legal Aid Scheme until he assumed its chair- manship in 2010. Justice William Atuguba was appointed to Ghana’s Supreme Court in 1996 and is cur- rently the head of the nine-member panel of justices deliberating the landmark electoral lawsuit brought by the main opposition New Patri- otic Party against the Electoral Com- mission. According to Justice Atuguba the Legal Aid Scheme, constitutionally created in 1987 to benefit citizens
Parliament shouldn’t approve $3bn Chinese commercial loan
The Parliamentary Joint Committee of Finance and Poverty Reduction is currently meeting in Koforidua (Tuesday, August 16 – Saturday, August 20) ostensibly to scrutinise, among others, a US$3 billion commercial term loan facility between the Republic of Ghana and the China Development Bank (CDB) to finance a series of projects, including the Achimota-Ofankor Road, a $150 communications infrastructure for the National Security Council, and a $100 million capacity building exercise for Ghanaian SMEs.
The Danquah Institute has predicted that Government is "very likely" to miss its revised end-of-year inflation target of 14.5%, despite projections by the highly reputable Centre for Policy Analysis (CEPA) that inflation could fall to 14.2% by the end of December. The institute also fears that World Bank prediction that another 500,000 Ghanaians would fall below the poverty line by 2010 “may be alarmingly conservative, considering subsequent unimpressive economic indicators since that prediction was made in June.”
Why China Does Capitalism Better than the U.S.
One of the great ironies revealed by the global recession that began in 2008 is that Communist Party–ruled China may be doing a better job managing capitalism's crisis than the democratically elected U.S. government. Beijing's stimulus spending was larger, infinitely more effective at overcoming the slowdown and directed at laying the infrastructural tracks for further economic expansion.
Election petition verdict was “corrupt judgment” - Gabby
A leading member of the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko says Thursday’s verdict on the election petition case was a “farcical” and “corrupt judgement”. “This was a corrupt judgement, and I say so without apologies”, the Danquah Institute Executive Director wrote on his facebook wall. Mr. Othcere-Darko, a cousin to the 2012 presidential Candidate of NPP, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, said the judgment by the nine-member panel of the Supreme Court was “potentially dangerous to our democracy”.
Ghana Sits on Borrowed Money & Borrowed Time
The World Bank Ghana Country Office’s Conference Room was the scene of lively discussions and startling revelations on Friday last week (18th June 2010). It emerged in a fascinating exchange between senior officials of the Ministry of Finance (past and present) and the country program manager of the Bank, Katherine Bain, that considerable amounts of monies approved for various projects in the country were still sitting idly in various accounts at the Ministry, several months after they were earmarked for disbursement towards critical development projects.
 Charlotte Osei appointed new EC boss
President John Dramani Mahama has, in accordance with Article 70(2) of the 1992 Constitution, appointed Mrs. Charlotte Osei as Chairperson of the Electoral Commission (EC) of Ghana.
Ghana sits on time bomb – Capt. Koomson
A retired officer of the Ghana Armed Forces, Captain Budu Koomson, believes prevailing conditions in the country make the staging of a coup d’état imminent. This, according to him, was because “the blatant abuse of state wealth by political operatives can trigger something like this coupled with the political stalemate in the society.”