The voting season is here once again. Between 2010 and 2012, voters in 10 out of the 11 Great Horn of East Africa (GHEA) countries will go to the polls. The only place where the election train will not stop is Eritrea where elections have been postponed indefinitely since 2001.

Who is riding the election train? Will it arrive at a place of increased citizen engagement in the development process? Will it lead to political and economic maturity? Or will the region end up with heightened conflict and polarized polities?

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The clamor for democracy all over the globe is not accidental. Those who go about such business of agitating for democratization are convinced that no society truly desirous of development can ignore democracy. The democratic experiences of the developed countries of the world lend credence to the truth of this claim. However, the reverse seems to be the case in many of the third world countries where there has been a huge golf between the anticipated gains of democracy and the reality on ground.

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The paper problematises the issues of democracy and good governance in Africa and analyses their future prospects especially in the 21st century. Liberal democracy and good governance, beside market reforms are the new puzzle words on the global agenda. Indeed, the three issues appear to be organically linked in the present context, with the hegemony of the liberal capitalist ideology in the international arena.

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The Republic of Ghana benefits from strong GDP growth, strengthening oil production volumes, and a track record of political stability. However, it continues to suffer from weak fiscal management highlighted by a widening of the fiscal deficit in 2010 and increased supplier arrears.

We are therefore affirming our 'B/B' foreign- and local-currency sovereign credit ratings on the Republic of Ghana. The stable outlook balances our view of the country's strong growth prospects and track record of political stability against its weak payment culture and fiscal challenges.

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Message by Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, 2012 Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party, on the occasion of the symposium commemorating Dr. Danquah’s death
On February 4, this time in 1965, 47 years ago, a great man, a great African died. He died as a political prisoner, in a 9 feet by 6 feet condemned cell. But, this was after he had successfully, along with other nationalists of his time, led the campaign to liberate Ghana from colonial rule. His name was Joseph Boakye Danquah, the doyen of the Gold Coast, the man whose academic enquiries convinced the rest of our founding fathers to adopt the ancient name Ghana for our independent nation in 1957. The man whose anniversary we are here to observe.
Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Report
Since its inception in 1997 by scholars at Babson College and London Business School, GEM has developed into one of the world’s leading research consortia concerned with improving our understanding of the relationships between entrepreneurship and national development. This is the 10th annual GEM Global Report. Over the past decade, harmonized data on entrepreneurial attitudes, activity and aspirations have been collected to provide annual assessments of the entrepreneurial sector for a wide range of countries. more >>>
DI holds forum on $3 billion Chinese loan
The Danquah Institute in collaboration with its media partners, Citi FM and Hot FM, is holding a forum on the $3 billion Chinese loan on Tuesday, 18th October 2011. The forum is similar to the one organised by the institute which scrutinised the STX Housing project where serious objections were raised with regards to certain aspects of the loan. These objections resulted in major changes being made to the agreement, and has subsequently saved this country billions of dollars.
Africa and the Arab Spring: A New Era of Democratic Expectations
2011 saw dramatic changes in Africa’s governance landscape. Unprecedented popular demonstrations in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya led to the overturning of a century of autocratic rule in North Africa.These protests, demanding greater political freedom, economic opportunity, and an end to systemic corruption, have resonated deeply across Africa, sparking calls for change throughout the continent. Already home to more of the world’s democratizing states than any other region, even modest reverberations from the Arab Spring on Africa’s democratic trajectory will have implications for global governance norms, stability, and development. Click here for report
The modern state of Ghana was formed in 1957 from several territorial units administered under British colonial authority. These included the Gold Coast Colony, the traditional state of Ashanti, the Northern Territories Protectorate, and the Trust Territory of British Togo land. Early nationalist movements were active primarily within the Gold Coast Colony, which had achieved some measure of indigenous participation in governmental organs by 1946. Prominent in the movement for self-government was J.B. Danquah, instrumental in the founding of the United Gold Coast Convention (UGCC) in 1946 and Kwame Nkrumah, who formed the Convention People's Party (CPP) two years later.
The Danquah Institute is organsing a symposium at the University of Ghana on Thursday, 17 September. The theme of the symposium is: Has Ghana a Founder or Founders? The symposium is part of DI's mission to enhance today's generation of Ghanaians' appreciation of the country's history as an essential part of efforts towards nation-building. The symposium is being organised in conjunction with the national secretariat of the Graduate Students Association of Ghana (GRASAG). It will take place at 4pm at the conference hall of the Kwame Nkrumah Complex, Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra and feature speakers and historians from different ideological traditions.
Why Martin A. B. K. Amidu is not using government or party channels for his advocacy for accountability and transparency
The purpose of this statement following immediately after my opinion of 28th May 2012 stating that the President’s executive judgment in the matter of the Supreme Court decision in the case of Okudzeto Ablakwa and Omane-Boamah against the Attorney-General (Jake Obetsebi-Lampety voluntarily applied and was joined as additional Defendant) is to answer the accusations and spins on why I am not directing my criticisms in-house to the Government or the NDC. The Government spin since I left office has been that I am a disgruntled smokescreen being used by the NPP against the Government.
U.S. Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, gave a prophetic advice to Middle East leaders gathered in Qatar for the Forum of the Future on January 12 that their regimes should adapt or die. Reform or deform. A few days later, Ben Ali fell and, and scents from the Jasmine Revolution filling the air ofEgypt, with Hosni Mubarak, misreading the mood and sacking his government and promising to step down at a future date when the demand of the masses are simply: ‘go and go now!’. What is happening in the two Arab nations has been compared to the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovokia in 1989 and its domino effect in shredding to pieces the iron curtain, which led to the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe and the subsequent dominance of multiparty democracy in bothEurope and Africa.
Under her Model Petroleum Agreement (MPA), Ghana, a newcomer in the global oil industry has adopted the Royalty Tax System to govern the fiscal regime for the country’s petroleum sector. Even before production tentatively begins in 2010 when the agreement would be put to test, critics say that Ghana would obtain greater financial benefit under the terms of a production-sharing contract (PSC). This paper discusses Ghana’s MPA and contrasts this to the argument that the country would benefit from using PSCs. The paper describes the MPA, the advantages and disadvantages of an R/T system and those of the PSC System. The paper exceeds the argument that form matters, and points to the importance of either systems having to achieve a stable consensus between the main parties involved. more >>>
NPP's Petition to the Supreme Court
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION PETITION IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION CHALLENGING THE VALIDITY OF THE ELECTION OF JOHN DRAMANI MAHAMA AS PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF GHANA PURSUANT TO THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION HELD ON 7TH AND 8TH DECEMBER 2012: Article 64 of the Constitution, 1992; Section 5 of the Presidential Election Act, 1992 (PNDCL 285); and Rule 68 & 68 A of the Supreme Court (Amendment) Rules 2012, C. I. 74