As a result of the discovery of commercial volumes of hydrocarbons in 2007, the Government of Ghana set an overall goal for the enery sector focussed on the "the development and sustenance of an efficient and viable energy sector that provides secure, safe and reliable supply of enery to meet Ghana's development needs in a competitive manner."

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E-voting refers to an election or referendum that involves the use of electronic means in at least the casting of the vote. The introduction of e-voting raises some of the same challenges as are faced when applying electronics to any other subject, for example e-government. Politicians or administrators may perhaps expect that a paper version of a certain service or process can simply be taken and put on the Internet.

Unfortunately, the reality is more complex, and nowhere more so than with e-voting.

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AVANTE Biometric Voter Registration Solution creates and prints voter registration form for automatic data capturing with unique identifier. Voters fill in the registration forms. Registration staff assists to ensure completeness and accuracy.

The forms are scanned for automatic personal-demographic data capturing. Staff checks the captured data for completeness before direct biometric data capturing.

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The 2012 Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, has stated that the results of Junior High School students who sat for the recent Basic Education Certificate Examination give credence to why “I have made education, education, education, a high priority of an Akufo-Addo administration.”

According to the NPP flagbearer, “this year’s BECE results are at best, negatively, consistent with the results of previous years, except we have more people failing this year, and facing a very bleak future prospect.”


Other Stories

P/NDC supporters have one myth that they hold dear, to wit, J. A. Kuffuor packed the courts to secure the conviction of Tsatsu Tsikata. Not only is this mythical, it is equally claptrap and hooey. It is well known that Tsatsu was convicted by one judge, who incidentally was appointed by Chairman JJR long before JAK became President, Judge Henrietta Abban, who was maligned and harassed for just doing her job.
Nigeria gross government revenues rise for second month in June
Nigeria's gross government revenues rose for the second consecutive month in June to 485.95 billion naira ($2.44 billion), up 33 percent from May, the finance ministry said.
Under her Model Petroleum Agreement (MPA), Ghana, a newcomer in the global oil industry has adopted the Royalty Tax System to govern the fiscal regime for the country’s petroleum sector. Even before production tentatively begins in 2010 when the agreement would be put to test, critics say that Ghana would obtain greater financial benefit under the terms of a production-sharing contract (PSC). This paper discusses Ghana’s MPA and contrasts this to the argument that the country would benefit from using PSCs. The paper describes the MPA, the advantages and disadvantages of an R/T system and those of the PSC System. The paper exceeds the argument that form matters, and points to the importance of either systems having to achieve a stable consensus between the main parties involved. more >>>
Chapter One: The Propagandization of Ghana’s History By Gabby Otchere-Darko You may be forgiven in thinking that the First Republic has been revisited. Thus, we have returned to the era where it is sacrilegious to criticize Kwame Nkrumah and it is rewarding to denigrate the other founding fathers of Ghana.The Monday 11 October, 2010 editorial of The Insight newspaper of Marxist-Nkrumaist, Kwesi Pratt, was simply titled ‘GABBY OTCHERE-DARKO’. The short editorial is reproduced below for emphasis:We have no quarrel with Gabby Otchere-Darko, the Executive Director of the Danquah Institute over his decision to glorify the ideals of Dr J B Danquah, an icon of reactionary and neo-colonial politics in Ghana.
NPA’s 10% reduction in Petroleum Prices – “Too Little” or “Too Late”?
NPA’s Arrogance or Economics? On the eve of the New Year, 2015, the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) announced a reduction in ex-pump prices of petroleum products by 10% across board. This was not without drama. Most of the headlines that followed the announcement pointed to price reduction under duress. A number of civil society organizations and political parties put pressure on NPA to reduce the prices due to reasons such as the oil price crush and relative stability in the value of the local Ghanaian currency. Some of the organizations threatened public demonstrations against NPA and the Government; a situation that was expected considering that petro-politics is a feature of petroleum pricing in most parts of the world.
Africa Human Development Report 2012 - Towards a Food Secure Future
Africa has seen an extraordinary rebound in economic growth over the past decade. Some of the world’s fastest growing economies are in Africa, and they have expanded even during the ongoing uncertainty in the global economy. This has brought a much-needed reduction in poverty in the region and a renewed sense of optimism about its future. There is no doubt that economic growth is critical for human development, and it is imperative that growth be sustained. Click here for full report
Budget Statement and Economic Policy Of the   Government of Ghana for the 2011 Financial Year
Theme: “Stimulating Growth for Development and Job Creation” THE BUDGET STATEMENT AND ECONOMIC POLICY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011 1. Madam Speaker, I beg to move that this august House approves the Budget Statement and Economic Policy of the Government for the year ending 31st December, 2011. 2. Madam Speaker, in accordance with Article 179 of the 1992 Constitution, I have the singular honour and privilege to stand before this august House and the people of Ghana to present the 2011 Budget Statement and Economic Policy on behalf of the President, His Excellency, Prof. John Evans Atta Mills. more >>>
Government’s decision to cut spending on capitation grant and other social interventions hurting education
The Danquah Institute is worried about the institutionalised nurturing of a future of hopelessness and uncertainties for an estimated 90 percent of Ghanaian children. The situation is being worsened by the policy decision of the current Government to slash funding in the critical areas of Capitation Grant, School Feeding, Teacher Training/Incentives, Textbooks, and the overall administration and investment areas of the Education Sector. The amount allocated under the new Social Intervention Programme (SIP) to Education of GH¢102.9 million is not enough to keep up with inflation. This would hurt the positive trend over the last six years or so which has seen more and more children from deprived backgrounds gaining access to education.
Report of the Committee on Subsidiary Legislation on the Representation of the People
The Electoral Commission has detected some misplacements and non-placement of certain electoral areas in the proposed instrument. These errors have all been corrected as a result of the meetings that the Commission has held with the Subsidiary Legislation Committee. The errors occurred as a result of the use of a latter version of L.I. 1983 which version was subsequently nullified by a decision of the Supreme Court. Clicke here for full report
GHANA’S EXPERIENCE’, BY GABBY ASARE OTCHERE-DARKO “Ghana obtained independence from British colonial rule in 1957, the first African country, south of the Sahara, to do so. The country was full of promise and expectations of Ghanaians were high. In the words of Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, the first President, Ghana wanted to show the world that the black man can handle his own affairs. Some 53 years later, the optimism has somewhat waned and harsh reality has set in with the wide chasm between what is Ghana today and what could have been.” The above serves as the curtain opener to ‘Monetary Policy and Financial Sector Reform in Africa: Ghana’s Experience,’ written by Dr Mahamudu Bawumia. The book is a comprehensive, objective, concise history of Ghana since 1957, written by an Economist, to be precise a liberal economist cast in the developmentalist mould of a Ghanaian nationalist. But, the book is not only a historical work, stretching from 1957 to 2008. More importantly, it provides information and models that are both historical and contemporary. It is detailed, easy to read, objectively factual and accurate. It is an excellent read for both persons who are new to economics and the others – Economics students, researchers, economists, bankers, politicians, and historians.