×

Error

AutoTweet NG Component is not installed or not enabled. - /home/danquahi/public_html/plugins/system/autotweetcontent/autotweetcontent.php

Coup leaders must seize and hold central authority for at least one week to be considered a “successful” coup d’etat. The names of coup “leaders” listed are those named in reports, accusations, and/or subsequent trials. The date of the coup event is the beginning date for successful or attempted coups and the date of announcement for discovered coup plots and coup allegations.

Click here for full report

The voting season is here once again. Between 2010 and 2012, voters in 10 out of the 11 Great Horn of East Africa (GHEA) countries will go to the polls. The only place where the election train will not stop is Eritrea where elections have been postponed indefinitely since 2001.

Who is riding the election train? Will it arrive at a place of increased citizen engagement in the development process? Will it lead to political and economic maturity? Or will the region end up with heightened conflict and polarized polities?

Click here for full report

Civil unrest in the aftermath of Kenya’s 2007 elections prompted the government of Kenya to completely overhaul its system of managing elections. The IIEC was formed to replace the previous Electoral Commission of Kenya and charged with the mission to institutionalize sustainable electoral processes that would guarantee fair elections.

The mandate of the IIEC covered all aspects of implementing elections including reform of the electoral process; conducting a fresh registration of all Kenyan voters to create a completely new voter register; developing a modern system for collection, collation, transmission and tallying of electoral data and promoting voter education.

Read more...

The paper problematises the issues of democracy and good governance in Africa and analyses their future prospects especially in the 21st century. Liberal democracy and good governance, beside market reforms are the new puzzle words on the global agenda. Indeed, the three issues appear to be organically linked in the present context, with the hegemony of the liberal capitalist ideology in the international arena.

Click here for full report

Other Stories

Technology is the solution to Illiteracy – Mr. Kofi Bentil
Mr. Kofi Bentil of IMANI Ghana has stated that the solution to illiteracy in Ghana is the introduction of technology into all spheres of the Ghanaian life.He made this statement at a conference being organised by the Danquah Institute on biometric voter registration and electronic voting in Ghana. The first day of the two days conference was devoted to interrogating the advantages and challenges of introducing biometric voter registration and the second day devoted to e-voting in Ghana.
GHANA MUST WAKE UP, SHOUT FOR A NEW REGISTER AND SHAKE UP THE EC
FITCH Rating’s latest report on Ghana lays particular emphasis on the importance of Ghana’s democracy and stability to the country’s economic prospects. Whiles it gives a negative outlook based on how the economy is being run, Fitch makes the point that Ghana’s credit rating has not, however, fallen below ‘B’ because of the country’s “strong governance record and recent democratic history,” and that, this is “reflected in Ghana’s ability to attract foreign direct investment, which at 7% of GDP is well above that of Nigeria, Gabon, Zambia, Kenya and Angola.”
Address by K. B. Amissah-Arthur, Governor of The Bank of Ghana at the Launch of the Guidelines on AML/CFT For Banks and Non-Bank Financial Institutions, January 4, 2012.
It is a great pleasure to welcome you to the launch of guidelines on Anti-Money Laundering and the Combating of the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) for our Banks and Non-Bank Financial Institutions. This document has been jointly prepared by the Bank of Ghana and the Financial Intelligence Centre. This event follows on the launch of AML/CFT guidelines for capital market operators by the Securities and Exchange Commission on 20th December 2011.
A ruling not in the supreme interest of the nation
In a 5-4 ruling, the nine-panel Justices of Ghana’s Supreme Court on August 29 dismissed the petition filed by the NPP, challenging the validity of the Dec 7, 2012 presidential election won by the current president, John Mahama. Nana Akuffo-Addo, the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) challenger and petitioner called the president to concede defeat and congratulated him. He also called on his supporters to accept the verdict, though he disagreed with it, and later announced that he was going to take some time off politics to rest.
Is IPAC losing its focus towards electoral transparency?
After the much anticipated need for electoral reforms in Ghana to stem the tide of voter fraud, it is beginning to look like the government has finally buckled to the wishes of common sense that the kind of voters register we have used since 1992 is redundant, retrogressive unwanted and to a large extent archaic. The wish of common sense would have been that we switched to biometric registration followed by e-voting. Somehow the government has agreed to fund the biometric registration but has curiously refused to fund the e-voting. Be that as it may the next step is to give the various political parties a clear road map to the implementation of the biometric registration.
Nearly One in Four Worldwide Thriving
Nearly one-quarter of adults worldwide (24%) are "thriving," according to Gallup surveys in 146 countries in 2011. The percentage rating their current and future lives positively enough to be considered thriving ranged from a high of 74% in Denmark to a low of 2% in Cambodia. Read more>>>
So Who Are The Real Property-Owning Democrats?
Last week I wrote, "As an ardent believer of a property-owning democracy and a fierce critic of the shameful, lackluster commitment that the NPP showed in realizing this -- its philosophy -- when it was in office for 8 years, my initial reaction was one of great excitement to the news that a public-private-partnership was going to add 200,000 new, decent, affordable homes to the local housing stock. I greeted the news with some chuffy grin of irony: it took a so-called capitalist party to implement a health insurance policy and it is taking a so-called social democratic party to democratize property ownership." The NPP's founding father, the great man, Joseph Boakye Danquah, saw it as the patriotic duty of the party in government “to liberate the energies of the people for the growth of a property-owning democracy in this land, with right to life, freedom and justice, as the principles to which the Government and laws of the land should be dedicated in order specifically to enrich life, property and liberty of each and every citizen.”
Will auditing and cleaning up give us a credible register?
Last week, the NPP led a brave charge for a new register at a public forum which I maintain was arranged to reject that very proposition. Leading the vociferous charge against disturbing the current register was the ruling National Democratic Congress, supported by parties, most of whom exist only on paper, but have reserved seats at the IPAC table.
Seven in ten Africans own their own mobile phones, with access essentially universal in Algeria and Senegal, according to Afrobarometer findings from across 34 countries. The report, based on face-to-face interviews with more than 51,000 people, reveals that 84% use cell phones at least occasionally, a higher level of access than reported previously by the United Nations. Internet use is less common - with only 18% using it at least monthly. These technological trends are detailed in Afrobarometer's report, "The Partnership of Free Speech and Good Governance in Africa," released today at the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Nairobi. Written by Winnie Mitullah and Paul Kamau at IDS, the report identifies the countries with the highest and lowest use of information and communications technologies.
Since the 2003 FSAP Update, Ghana’s financial system has undergone rapid growth and structural transformation. Although the financial system remains relatively underdeveloped, the number of intermediaries and their scale of operations have increased, most notably in banking, insurance, capital markets, and micro finance. The range of financial services has also broadened and corporate structures are becoming complex, with conglomerates gaining importance. In addition, foreign shareholding, particularly from within Africa, has increased in the banking and insurance sectors. more>>>