New oil, Chinese investment, stable government, highest growth in the world: Ghana is a new success story. But be careful with the exact figures.

While all countries revise their GDP numbers and other accounts, Ghana’s revision of the data takes some beating. The Q2 GDP figure was reported in September as 33.5 per cent. The new figure? 16.4 per cent, less than half. Other numbers given for individual sectors are even further reduced.

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A financial analyst and CEO of SEM Capital, Dr. Sam Mensah, has said that Ghana needs to raise its credit ratings as an alternative to facilitate any form of borrowing especially on the capital market.

He made the assertion during a roundtable discussion organized by the Danquah Institute and partnered by the World Bank and Citi FM on the three billion Chinese loan facility, which has been contracted by the Ghana government for various development projects.

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Voter registration is highly complex and is the single most expensive activity within the framework of elections. Voter registration is not just the technical implementation of an activity; it is a holistic political, administrative and practical process. The role of voter registration is especially important when it comes

to emerging democracies: it can make or break an election. The quality of the process and the product – that is, the voters’ roll – can determine the outcome of an election and consequently the stability of the democratic institutions in acountry.

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It has been revealed that Ghana has an unlimited access to the United States Exim Guarantee Bank and thus can access any amount of loans it requires for embarking on developmental projects of the country.

Mr Ryan Bowles, the Chief of the Economics Section at the US Embassy in Accra made this known in a discussion with the Executive Director of the Danquah Institute, Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, at a roundtable discussion organised by DI to discuss the $3 billion Chinese loan facility.

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Politicians should first seek the interest of society - Bawumia
Dr. Mahamud Bawumia, running mate of Nana Akufo Addo, New Patriotic Party (NPP) flagbearer, over the weekend called on politicians to make the interest of society paramount by preaching peace as it was the surest way to develop society. According to him, preaching violence instead of peace would destroy society where everybody would end up as a loser.
Voter Registration Can Make or Break an Election By Nana Attobrah Quaicoe, DI
Distinguished Guests, the Media, Ladies and Gentlemen, the Danquah Institute was invited by the coalition of pressure groups agitating for a new register to come and share with the general public the doubts we have raised over the last few years on the integrity of the voter registration that took place in 2012 and the way forward. We accepted the invitation and I am happy to say that this is my first public statement since my appointment by the governing board of the institute as its Executive Director on 1st September.
Press Release: Gov’t loses another landmark court case; reduce fuel prices, court orders
An Accra High Court (Cocoa Affairs, Court 11) presided over by His Lordship Patrick Baayeh has handed down a heavy judgement on the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) and Tema Oil Refinery (TOR) in a case in which three plaintiffs accused the NPAand TOR of inflating fuel prices and using the money for hidden purposes. more>>
Kenya election: 'Tech hub' hopes take polling day blow
On polling day it was the biometric voter-identification kits that failed. Then, about 36 hours into the counting process, the electronic transmission system shuddered to a halt. This election will be remembered as the poll where paper trumped digital.
Foresight Africa: Implementing a New U.S.-Africa Policy
2013 ushered in the most significant change in the United States’ Africa policy since the passing of PEPFAR 10 years ago. The unveiling of investment-focused initiatives—Power Africa and Trade Africa—reflects not just a change in how the Obama administration views the continent, but also how foreign investors have prioritized it. But policy rarely achieves its objectives without equal attention to implementation. A number of implementation barriers—old regulations and new policies working at cross-purposes, and limited on-the-ground capacity—threaten to undermine America’s new approach to the continent in 2014. If 2013 was marked by change in U.S. strategy towards Africa, 2014 will be marked by the recognition that 90 percent of the success of that strategy is implementation.
STX – Acting Before We Think
When we initially raised concerns about STX, we were ignored, persistence however paid off and now people realize what a bad deal we were being run into. Even the minority in parliament was criticized for not flagging the obvious problems earlier; well they finally got it and succeeded in getting it withdrawn. There’s more. The problems with STX are myriad, whichever way you look at it STX is such a bad deal, it casts a very bad shadow on us as a people, especially on our leaders ability to analyze and judge right. In raising issues however we had to be selective to ensure we pointed out pertinent actionable details, hence our resort to pointing out the incomplete documentation, the Oil Swap, the bloated price etc. These however do not take away the biggest and most serious problem we couldn’t raise in the earlier in order not to complicate things.
M&J Prosecutor arrives in Ghana
The prosecutor for the Mabey & Johnson international corruption case which ended in a conviction in the United Kingdom last September, has arrived in Ghana to deliver two public lectures on how to tackle Money Laundering and International Corruption. While in Ghana, he is scheduled to meet some public officials, as well, notable amongst them is Justice Emile Short, the head of the Commission for Human Rights & Administrative Justice. more >>>
Postponement of Liberty Lecture
The Danquah Institute regrets to announce that the Liberty Lecture scheduled for this evening has been postponed to Wednesday, August 31, 2011. We regret deeply any inconvenience caused by this postponement.
Critical News: What happened to Us?
It is over. With a finality that left us numb and confused, Thursday morning, prepped for the 10am start, like many other Ghanaians I had a good breakfast with family, our mindsets tuned to a historical upheaval of one sort or another and we weren’t disappointed. We had a historical event, it ended so quickly even the Petitioners and Respondent lawyers did not understand the verdict. Watching aghast, both sides tried to digest the decision, neither the NDC nor the NPP realizing it was over. So not seeing the NPP roaring a win, the NDC figured they had won and started waving white handkerchiefs. Were Ghanaians disappointed? What happened to us? Accra went mute, Kumasi shut down, Takoradi just closed shop and the NDC party itself could only celebrate at their Headquarters. The streets went silent and traffic flowed in an uneasy stream, reflecting Ghanaians’ response to the judgment.
In the highly volatile world of oil and gas contracting, the common law principle that all contracts entered into should be performed in good faith, often finds itself threatened by attempts by host governments to re-negotiate contracts, and in more severe cases, attempts at expropriation or nationalisation. The basis on which states are able to do this almost unflinchingly is the international law concept of State Sovereignty. One of the ways by which international oil companies have sought cover against such situations is by the inclusion of stabilization clauses (in whatever shape or form) in international oil agreements. How can Ghana ensure that, unlike the controversies in the mining sector, the stabilisation clauses in oil contracts strike a proper balance between investor interest and national interest?