A national opinion poll conducted by international market research organization, Synovate, has the 2012 Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, 5 percentage points ahead of his closest rival, President JEA Mills, Presidential Candidate of the ruling National Democratic Congress, in the run up to the 2012 general elections.

However, if elections were held today Nana Akufo-Addo would lead but still fall short of the more than 50% mark required for outright victory. The opinion poll carried out in September this year surveyed a total of 1,723 respondents.

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The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results.

Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, has called for a competent assessment of infrastructural projects to ensure that Ghana consistently gets value for money and that such investment spending does not disturb future national budgets and the country’s ability to pay off its debts.

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Figures from the West African Examinations Council show that the pass-rate of students who sat for the Basic Education Certificate Examination has been on a constant downward decline since 2009. In sum, out of the total number of 1,121,817 students who sat for the BECE in the past three years, 574,688 failed to achieve the pass mark.

This means that more than half a million young people, with an average age of 15 years, have been thrown onto the streets with no employable skills in the past three years alone.

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The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results.

Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, warned against the pursuit of “white elephant projects.”

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So Who Are The Real Property-Owning Democrats?
Last week I wrote, "As an ardent believer of a property-owning democracy and a fierce critic of the shameful, lackluster commitment that the NPP showed in realizing this -- its philosophy -- when it was in office for 8 years, my initial reaction was one of great excitement to the news that a public-private-partnership was going to add 200,000 new, decent, affordable homes to the local housing stock. I greeted the news with some chuffy grin of irony: it took a so-called capitalist party to implement a health insurance policy and it is taking a so-called social democratic party to democratize property ownership." The NPP's founding father, the great man, Joseph Boakye Danquah, saw it as the patriotic duty of the party in government “to liberate the energies of the people for the growth of a property-owning democracy in this land, with right to life, freedom and justice, as the principles to which the Government and laws of the land should be dedicated in order specifically to enrich life, property and liberty of each and every citizen.”
What Americans Keep Ignoring About Finland's School Success
Everyone agrees the United States needs to improve its education system dramatically, but how? One of the hottest trends in education reform lately is looking at the stunning success of the West's reigning education superpower, Finland. Trouble is, when it comes to the lessons that Finnish schools have to offer, most of the discussion seems to be missing the point. The small Nordic country of Finland used to be known -- if it was known for anything at all -- as the home of Nokia, the mobile phone giant. But lately Finland has been attracting attention on global surveys of quality of life -- Newsweek ranked it number one last year -- and Finland's national education system has been receiving particular praise
American Clean Energy and Security Act and Its Impact on West Africa
In June 2009, Congress passed the Waxman-Markey Act, also known as the American Clean Energy and Security (ACES) Act. This act sets limits on greenhouse gases (GHG), and could have a very serious impact on African countries dependent on revenues from the production of hydrocarbons in the future. Consequently, crude oil exporting countries would see that demand from the U.S. seriously curtailed, and the U.S. could be out of the world market as an importer of crude oil. With countries like Angola and Nigeria, and in the very near future Ghana, exporting crude oil to the U.S., ACES will certainly have an impact on the economies of these countries. Currently, fossil fuels are the main source of energy production in the U.S. Fossil fuels are the source of GHG and this act allows the U.S. government to set mandates on GHG emissions. U.S. President Obama set reduction of GHG as part of his clean energy policy. GHG released into the atmosphere must be reduced to levels way below the levels seen in 2005. Using 2005 as the baseline, the Obama administration has set targets below the baseline. The key test will be in 2012, when U.S. companies will have to meet emission levels of 3 percent below the baseline. The other targets are GHG levels of 17 percent below the baseline by 2020, and a level 83 percent below the baseline by 2050. These targets apply to individual companies, industry groups and the various regions of the U.S.
The paper presents a base case economic analysis of the current East African regional integration processes. The fast track political federation processes which started in 2004, establishment of East African customs Union (EAC-CU) in 2005, and the recent 2008 renewed African Economic Community initiatives are part and parcel of the third generation regional integration economic and political reforms pursued by the partner states, and aimed at fostering both national and regional competitive social economic capacities. The paper notes that East African economies are small, but with regional integration, there is a possibility for opening up new business activities, markets, access to finance and technology. These aspects are crucial for maximum utilization of natural and human resources for sustainable economic growth and reduction of poverty. Also, the paper finds that standards of living in these East African countries are similar, below average African continental standards and declining in many areas. more >>>
It would be correct to say that a number of the policies and actions of democratic governments in the world often run counter to the wishes and desires of a great majority of the people in the nation. This is because those policies and actions are adopted by the government and some lawmakers that comprise a relatively few people, thus exclusive of the inputs, preferences, and wishes of a large majority of the people. It is not enough, surely, for the people to be included—and to participate--only in the periodic election of those who are to govern and to make laws for the state. The consequences of the exclusion of large segments of the population from the decisions of the government that affect the lives of the people have been public demonstrations to protest government policy and action and to indicate the preferences of the people. Political conflict, violence, rancor, and misunderstanding have also resulted from the exclusion of the people from decisions and choices of their government.
BAWUMIA TAKES NOISE OUT OF POLITICAL ECONOMY -- A REVIEW OF MAHAMUDU BAWUMIA’S ‘MONETARY POLICY AND FINANCIAL
GHANA’S EXPERIENCE’, BY GABBY ASARE OTCHERE-DARKO “Ghana obtained independence from British colonial rule in 1957, the first African country, south of the Sahara, to do so. The country was full of promise and expectations of Ghanaians were high. In the words of Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, the first President, Ghana wanted to show the world that the black man can handle his own affairs. Some 53 years later, the optimism has somewhat waned and harsh reality has set in with the wide chasm between what is Ghana today and what could have been.” The above serves as the curtain opener to ‘Monetary Policy and Financial Sector Reform in Africa: Ghana’s Experience,’ written by Dr Mahamudu Bawumia. The book is a comprehensive, objective, concise history of Ghana since 1957, written by an Economist, to be precise a liberal economist cast in the developmentalist mould of a Ghanaian nationalist. But, the book is not only a historical work, stretching from 1957 to 2008. More importantly, it provides information and models that are both historical and contemporary. It is detailed, easy to read, objectively factual and accurate. It is an excellent read for both persons who are new to economics and the others – Economics students, researchers, economists, bankers, politicians, and historians.
Brief Report On The Presidential Election Petition In Ghana
Four months before the 2012 general elections in Ghana, the seated President and ruling party candidate, John Atta Mills, passed away. At the time, the incumbent was down in the polls and Vice President John Mahama, then embroiled in a series of multi-million dollar corruption scandals, became the presidential candidate. Allegations of large scale, systemic bribery and systematic vote buying were common with this election. Checks show that an estimated $180m of unbudgeted expenditures were made from the treasury in the last 6 weeks before the election, much of which can be directly traced to efforts to influence the election illegally by bribing electoral officials and buying votes. Information provided to the opposition, prior to the election, alleged that the ruling party had set out to compromise electoral officers and other election agents in at least 180 of 275 constituencies across the country.
EC lauds registration exercise
The Electoral Commission (EC) says it is impressed with the level of patronage in the just ended voters registration exercise. According to the Public Relations Officer of the commission, Christian Owusu-Parry, the exercise went on well, having assessed its successes since Sunday.
Ghana: lies, damn lies and estimates
New oil, Chinese investment, stable government, highest growth in the world: Ghana is a new success story. But be careful with the exact figures. While all countries revise their GDP numbers and other accounts, Ghana’s revision of the data takes some beating. The Q2 GDP figure was reported in September as 33.5 per cent. The new figure? 16.4 per cent, less than half. Other numbers given for individual sectors are even further reduced.
If you ‘Woyomise’ the economy the cedi will depreciate- Bawumia
Dr Mahamadu Bawumia says pumping a lot of money into the economy for no work done is partly the reason for the depreciation of the country’s currency.Describing the phenomenon as "woyomisation of the economy" in reference to the payment of judgement debts to Alfred Woyome, Construction Pioneers and others, the NPP vice presidential candidate said the free fall of the country’s currency is an expression of the lack of confidence in the economy.