Figures from the West African Examinations Council show that the pass-rate of students who sat for the Basic Education Certificate Examination has been on a constant downward decline since 2009. In sum, out of the total number of 1,121,817 students who sat for the BECE in the past three years, 574,688 failed to achieve the pass mark.

This means that more than half a million young people, with an average age of 15 years, have been thrown onto the streets with no employable skills in the past three years alone.

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The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results.

Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, warned against the pursuit of “white elephant projects.”

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The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results.

Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, has called for a competent assessment of infrastructural projects to ensure that Ghana consistently gets value for money and that such investment spending does not disturb future national budgets and the country’s ability to pay off its debts.

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Wednesday, sounding rather frail, the absentee Minister of Health, gave interviews to say that no, he had not gone on leave to campaign in his constituency. He was only there to ‘interact’ as part of his medical leave. Joseph Yieleh Chireh was reacting to a report in the Chronicle that while patients were suffering under the doctors’ strike, the minister responsible was campaigning in his Wa West Constituency, Upper West Region.

The Chronicle said “Mr Yieleh Chireh was at the Dabu Electoral Area in the Upper West Region on Tuesday, holding meetings with NDC executives in the constituency, in a bid to retain him to contest the [parliamentary] elections” next year.

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Balancing Speed With Justice, The Task Before The 9 Justices
There is some considerable weight of apprehension across the country. On the one hand, there are people who are a fearful of trouble were the court to rule against the petitioners and there are those who fear the reaction of the ruling party were the court to rule for the petitioners. But one thing ( I hope) unites all sides of the anxiety chain, they want this case to be disposed off (not ‘speedily’, perhaps, but expeditiously and in the interest of justice). Indeed, such is the level of this apprehension that the Editorial of the Accra Mail last week, ‘Ghana’s Peace & Security in the hands of the NPP’ said, “It may seem all so civilized - that is [NPP] resorting to court action – but many a blood-letter situation has started that way: the refusal to accept election results. Do NPP leaders in their wildest dreams think that Ghana would survive the turmoil of a disruption in the status quo? If that’s their mindset, then their naïveté approaches criminal nonchalance! Reason and wisdom must prevail as they strategise for 2016. They must listen to compatriots like Opanin Adusei, Dr Wereko-Brobby and discontinue this litigation to save our nation the trauma their action is inexorably leading us to.” In a curious twist, Haruna Attah’s paper is asking whether the NPP was ready for the disruption that could occur if the Supreme Court gave a ruling that would disturb the ‘status quo’, meaning a decision which would invalidate the results declared by the Electoral Commission.
STX housing project limbo
Standard Chartered Bank Ghana remains neutral as to whether it is leading a syndicate to contribute to raising US$1.5 billion to fund the STX Housing projects in parts of the country. Last week the Minister of Water Resources, Works and Housing, Mr. Alban Kingsford Sumana Baggbin, claimed that two large banks, Standard Chartered Bank and another bank in the United States of America (USA), had committed to releasing funds for the project. He will not state how much each of the banks will be releasing, but named the banks as Standard Chartered Bank, Ghana, which he said was leading the syndicate, He also named the Bank of America, which was prepared to release some amount in support of the project. When reached for further details on the syndication, officials of Standard Chartered Bank in Ghana were tight-lipped on the role of the bank in the STX Housing project.
This was the speech delivered by Boakye Agyarko, a fellow of the Danquah Institute at the conference hall of the Kwame Nkrumah Complex, Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon on Thursday, Sept 17. He made the argument that Ghana's struggle for independence was like a 4x100 relay race and Nkrumah certainly ran the last relay but should not be the only one to climb the platform to take the gold medal.
“….What do we have now? A thieving political and business elite who have not raised a dime of their own capital conniving with our civil and public servants to steal Ghana’s scarce resources under all sorts of rotten deals.….” I am constrained to cite these concluding lines from my tribute to B.A. Mensah because quite a few people, including two anxious Professors from the UDS I met at the funeral of the academic and (not-greedy) asute businessman and friend, Sam Aboah at Adukrom urged me to write an article premised on these lines. That paragraph forms the basis of this attempt to discuss the insidious matter of unashamed and barefaced thievery going on in Ghana.
IMANI Alert: Is Ghana Amongst the Worst-Branded in Africa Now?
On June 9th this year, a certain Daniel Fisher, a Senior Editor at Forbes Magazine specialising in macroeconomic and legal issues, wrote an article in which he “showcased” Ghana as the 9th “worst-managed country” in the world. This is curious, seeing that in the preceding month Mr. Fisher had written at least 25 articles almost exclusively on the domestic economy of the US. Indeed his only two forays into the global arena concerned this rather peculiar ranking of the “10 worst-managed economies of the world”.
The Fallacies of J.B. Danquah's Heroic Legacy - A Comment by Prof. R Addo-Fening
Allow me space to comment on the above mentioned publication which appeared in the Ghanaian Lens of Tuesday 6 June 2006. I owe it to students of Ghanaian History, Okyeman and the Ghanaian public at large not to let it pass without comment. The writer, Dr, Kwame Botwe-Asamoah, Professor of African/African American History, University of Pittsburgh, takes a swipe at President Kuffuor and Okyenhene Amoatia Ofori Panin - the former, for describing the late Dr. J.B. Danquah as "the Prime Minister Ghana never had" during the commemoration of the 40th anniversary of this death in February 2005; the latter for suggesting that the University of Ghana named after Dr. Danquah. more >>>
Report of the Committee on Subsidiary Legislation on the Representation of the People
The Electoral Commission has detected some misplacements and non-placement of certain electoral areas in the proposed instrument. These errors have all been corrected as a result of the meetings that the Commission has held with the Subsidiary Legislation Committee. The errors occurred as a result of the use of a latter version of L.I. 1983 which version was subsequently nullified by a decision of the Supreme Court. Clicke here for full report
Is Danquah Institute’s Warning/Threat of Legal Action Against the EC is Folly?
The Danquah Institute is reported to have warned the Electoral Commission not to create new constituencies based on the boundaries of new forty two districts that are soon to be created. The Institute further threatened to challenge the Electoral Commission at the court if the EC creates new constituencies based on the new districts (see “DI Warns: EC Cannot Create New Constituencies Based on New District”, Ghanaweb 19 March 2012). The thrust of their argument were that, the government by creating the new districts is compelling the Electoral Commission to create new constituencies based on the boundaries of new districts.
Hope and Experience: Election Reform through the Lens of the AEI-Brookings Election Reform Project
The American electoral system is in many respects an outlier among the world’s democracies. The indirect election of its president through the casting of electoral votes by the states, with no federal constitutional standing for the popular vote, is perhaps the most peculiar. Another is the extraordinary range and frequency of elections, matched only by Switzerland’s system. In the realm of election administration, two characteristics stand out: the highly decentralized nature of the system and the oversight and control of the election system by partisan elected officials. more >>>
Election 2012 petition verdict: Judgement of JSC Ansah
The facts surrounding this suit have been fully played out in near epic dimensions before the public. However, there is no way this suit can be seen as a likeness of the numerous cases on various aspects of our 1992 Constitution. Indeed, I venture to say it cannot be compared to any of the cases touching on various aspects of all our previous Constitutions.