A national opinion poll conducted by international market research organization, Synovate, has the 2012 Presidential Candidate of the New Patriotic Party, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, 5 percentage points ahead of his closest rival, President JEA Mills, Presidential Candidate of the ruling National Democratic Congress, in the run up to the 2012 general elections.

However, if elections were held today Nana Akufo-Addo would lead but still fall short of the more than 50% mark required for outright victory. The opinion poll carried out in September this year surveyed a total of 1,723 respondents.

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The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results.

Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, has called for a competent assessment of infrastructural projects to ensure that Ghana consistently gets value for money and that such investment spending does not disturb future national budgets and the country’s ability to pay off its debts.

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Figures from the West African Examinations Council show that the pass-rate of students who sat for the Basic Education Certificate Examination has been on a constant downward decline since 2009. In sum, out of the total number of 1,121,817 students who sat for the BECE in the past three years, 574,688 failed to achieve the pass mark.

This means that more than half a million young people, with an average age of 15 years, have been thrown onto the streets with no employable skills in the past three years alone.

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The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results.

Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, warned against the pursuit of “white elephant projects.”

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Other Stories

The Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning has been tasked to lead the preparation of the Ghana’s oil revenue and management law. A preliminary version of the proposals was posted online to solicit inputs. This latest version of the proposal has benefitted immensely from the public feedback. This version also reflects the results of the nation-wide public consultations held and survey questionnaire administered between February 24 and March 21, 2010, and it is made available again for your comments before submission to Cabinet. more >>>
Postponement of Liberty Lecture
The Danquah Institute regrets to announce that the Liberty Lecture scheduled for this evening has been postponed to Wednesday, August 31, 2011. We regret deeply any inconvenience caused by this postponement.
"It's not he who casts the votes that matters -- but he who counts the votes." -Joseph Stalin President Obama’s visit to Ghana earlier this year, gave us all as Ghanaians deep pride in our country and in our international reputation. That our small West African nation was chosen as the first in the whole continent to be so honoured since Obama took power was the result of an achievement we have built as a whole people since 1992 in not only the reborn of democracy but successfully warring off the infant mortality that has put paid to too many of our continental contemporaries.
Rawlings has a point, the growth in corruption is a major election issue, so is Ghana’s GH¢28.3BN
Former President Jerry john Rawlings has once again injected some excitement into the December elections with the issues he raised in his recent meeting with members of the Volta Regional House of Chiefs. In our view, he was sincere about the issues he raised and the angles he took. The ruling National Democratic Congress was, until July 24, going into a general election with a leader who was, understandably, very unwell. Now, in President John Dramani Mahama, they have a leader who has, indeed, added “a spark to the governing party…
Diaspora and drug trafficking in West Africa: A case study of Ghana
In a recent, important article on West African Criminal Networks in southern Africa, Mark Shaw highlighted the need for academic research – despite the difficulty in researching crime – to provide a fuller understanding of African criminal networks, ‘not least to provide an independent and strategic overview of developments and the identification of trends’. Much of the existing literature on the trafficking of illicit narcotic drugs (cannabis, heroin, and cocaine) has been from a policy perspective, funded by agencies in consumer countries in the West. more>>>
I have chosen the topic, Islam, Politics and Development: Negotiating the Future of Dagbon for good reason. Islam, since its introduction into Dagbon in 1700 through the conversion of Na Zangina, has exerted great influence on the Dagomba people. Dagomba customs and traditions are inextricably interwoven with Islamic ones. Naming, marriage and funeral ceremonies all show considerable Islamic influences. Even the most important festival of the Dagomba people, Damba, is celebrated to commemorate or coincide with Prophet Muhammad’s birthday. As far back as 1820, Joseph Dupuis, the British Consul to Ghana, on the testimony of Yendi traders, classified Dagbon among “governments which are either purely Moslem, or countries where the Koranic law had been received and serves for the civil code of the believer and infidel. more >>>
The Global Financial Crisis: Time to Rethink Africa’s Financing Options.
The global financial crisis occurred against the background of significantly improved growth and macroeconomic performance by African countries as a group over the last decade. GDP growth rates had steadily increased (averaging 6.0% over the last five years), inflation declined to single digits before the fuel and food price crisis in 2008, and external reserve positions improved. These developments were underpinned by structural policy reforms, favourable terms of trade and debt relief. In 2007 for example, the average annual GDP growth rate in Africa was 6.1%. While impressive when compared to the negative growth rates recorded in the 1980s, this was still below the 7% p.a. growth rate required to reduce poverty by half by 2015. By 2007, progress towards attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015 was mixed, with the continent as a whole lagging behind the MDGs despite the observed increase in GDP growth. The global financial crisis could therefore not have come at a more inopportune time for the African continent as many countries were just finding their feet and gaining some traction after decades of economic stagnation and macroeconomic instability.
Ghana can access $3 Billion from US Exim Bank
It has been revealed that Ghana has an unlimited access to the United States Exim Guarantee Bank and thus can access any amount of loans it requires for embarking on developmental projects of the country. Mr Ryan Bowles, the Chief of the Economics Section at the US Embassy in Accra made this known in a discussion with the Executive Director of the Danquah Institute, Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, at a roundtable discussion organised by DI to discuss the $3 billion Chinese loan facility.
In 1956, France implemented a series of institutional reforms that effectively allowed its African colonies to opt for integration with France instead of pursuing autonomous existence as independent states. Just two years later, France, under the leadership of Charles de Gaulle, offered the colonies, under the auspices of the Constitution of the French Fifth Republic, free association as autonomous republics within the Communauté française (French Community). Guinea was the only territory in France’s so-called Afrique noire to vote “Non” to de Gaulle’s proposal. Ivory Coast voted “Oui” as its elites saw Guinea’s total rejection of de Gaulle’s offer as not very pragmatic. Of course, within the new community, France would retain senior status and the former colonies would come in as junior partners. Nevertheless, leaders of the Francophone African colonies soon realized that they could opt for independence and still retain close and productive ties with France. Thus, following the lead of the former UN Trust Territory of Cameroons under French administration, which gained independence on January 1, 1960, Ivory Coast withdrew from the French Community and on August 7, 1960, declared its independence. However, it was not until October 31, 1960 that the National Assembly adopted a constitutional draft.
EIU: Election watch July 2015
There is little time for Mr Mahama and the NDC to turn the economy around before the December 2016 presidential and legislative elections.