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Once again, the President has proven to the citizenry, that he is the leader who is determined to lead the country on the trajectory of socio-economic transformation, personal liberties and economic freedoms. Addressing the media at the Jubilee House, the Presidential Seat, on 18th July, 2017, he made it clear of his resolve and drive to bequeath to the current and successive generations, a very robust economy and a prosperous nation. As has been the custom of previous presidents of the country over the years, especially under the Fourth Republic, the President, who was overwhelmingly, voted into office by the electorate in the December 7 polls, and also a firm believer in responsible governance, rendered an account of his stewardship to the people.

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Dr. Kingsley Nyarko is a Senior Lecturer at the Psychology Department, an adjunct of the Centre for Ageing Studies, and the Foundation Head of the Department of Teacher Education, School of Education and Leadership of the University of Ghana. He obtained his Bachelor of Education degree at the University of Cape-Coast, and both his Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. D.) degrees in Psychology and Educational Psychology respectively from the University of Munich, Germany. He has worked in internationally reputable organisations and serves on several boards and committees in the academia and corporate world. He is also an external examiner of the Department of Educational Foundations—University of Cape-Coast, internal examiner (Masters and Ph. D) at the University of Ghana, and a former visiting lecturer of GIMPA Business School and the University of Education (Kumasi campus).

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Good afternoon ladies and Gentlemen of the press. Thank you for coming on such short notice.

There’s a Ghanaian saying which goes like” Obaa a onim s3 onky3 wo aware ase no, otu bankye aa, ondua” akin to saying literally; that a lady whose days in her marital home are numbered, does not bother to re-plant uprooted cassava. 

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Other Stories

De-duplication won’t make register credible – Danquah Institute
Pro –opposition Think Tank, the Danquah Institute says the Electoral Commission (EC’s) decision to use de-duplication processes to rid the voters register of multiple registration will do very little to make the current voters register credible.
As far as I know, no constitution, in the world, recognizes or even acknowledges the importance of the concession by the losing presidential candidate in a presidential election. Nevertheless, this concession has become a ritual that all the advanced democracies acknowledge and recognize as an important element of their electoral activities. It is that singular action that signifies the successful resolution of the election and avoids the involvement of the judicial branch, in what should properly belong to the political space. Occasionally, however, there is a dispute about the election results and the concession is not forthcoming. In this situation, the optimal solution is to have the courts resolve the dispute prior to inaugurating the President. This is because most countries realize the irreparable harm inherent in inaugurating a President, who may not have been validly elected. Such harm includes, but is not limited to, the cloud that hangs around the Presidency, which might deter international stakeholders from dealing with the President, or dealing with him under significant uncertainty. Domestically, the President’s power to appoint is likely to come into conflict with the legislature’s power to vet as a serious legislature may raise questions about the wisdom in investing vetting resources into appointments that may be short-lived. Local actors may be plunged into a wait-and-see mode and freeze their business plans, in light of the uncertainty about the direction of the country.
Business Re-Engineering In A Global Recession
The causes of the late 2007 Global financial crisis which degenerated into a full blown recession by mid 2008 have been argued and discussed extensively. Whatever the causes, it is a fact that by the middle of 2008, the world economy was engulfed in a severe crisis of confidence. The classic signs of a recession were evident as stock markets crashed. Growth rates plummetted in all major economies and unemployment soared. Companies collapsed and financial markets were in turmoil. As two successive quarters of negative growth in GDP occurred in economy after economy, the academic definition for a recession was fulfilled. The IMF definition of annual growth of less than 3% was also fulfilled by the end of 2008.
E-voting handbook
E-voting refers to an election or referendum that involves the use of electronic means in at least the casting of the vote. The introduction of e-voting raises some of the same challenges as are faced when applying electronics to any other subject, for example e-government. Politicians or administrators may perhaps expect that a paper version of a certain service or process can simply be taken and put on the Internet. Unfortunately, the reality is more complex, and nowhere more so than with e-voting. Click here for full article
GHANA MUST WAKE UP, SHOUT FOR A NEW REGISTER AND SHAKE UP THE EC
FITCH Rating’s latest report on Ghana lays particular emphasis on the importance of Ghana’s democracy and stability to the country’s economic prospects. Whiles it gives a negative outlook based on how the economy is being run, Fitch makes the point that Ghana’s credit rating has not, however, fallen below ‘B’ because of the country’s “strong governance record and recent democratic history,” and that, this is “reflected in Ghana’s ability to attract foreign direct investment, which at 7% of GDP is well above that of Nigeria, Gabon, Zambia, Kenya and Angola.”
Ace Ankomah explains to all ye lay men why Woyome-gate stinks
There are a lot of things flying all around and above us about a man whose name has over the past few months become a noun, a verb, an adjective and any other literary device you may want to attribute it to. I had frankly never heard the name Woyome until the Chronicle blew the lid over some gargantuan amount (with all due respect and the succinct permission of a certain Martin Amidu) to the whole nation. All kinds of people, most of whom have absolutely no background in law nor finance to investigate or the journalism skill to piece together all of the numbers and laws for us all to understand, have been on air, on TV, on social media all seeking to exonerate government or make government look like a bunch of criminals out to dupe Ghana.
IMANI Alert: Parliament SHOULD NOT Approve Shady Housing Deal
Upon reviewing the ‘order paper’ laid before the current session of Parliament on the 16th of August 2012, IMANI has concluded that item F(II) on the order paper should not have advanced from committee level in the first place much less laid before the full House. Item F (II) – Report of the Joint Committee on Finance and Works & Housing
World Bank warns against prospect of $3bn “White Elephant Projects”
The World Bank has urged Ghanaians to expand public discussions on the controversial record loan facility from China to focus more on interrogating the efficient use of the funds and the nature and scope of the projects selected in order to achieve the desired national development results. Speaking at a public forum on the $3 billion Chinese Development Bank loan for infrastructural development, organized by the Danquah Institute, the resident Chief Economist of the World Bank, Sebastien Dessus, warned against the pursuit of “white elephant projects.”
Dzi Wo Fie Asem: Rhetoric and the Politics of Expediency
On 7th January 2011, His Excellency the President, in a face to face encounter with the media, used a proverb that has now become a household expression: Dzi wo fie asem. The incident could be considered as only a trigger for this evening’s talk, which centers on the character of political rhetoric within Ghana’s contemporary history. There appears to be a growing sensitivity to political communication in this country: specifically the norms of communication, or standards of propriety in speech comportment. There is a collective realization that the spoken word may have done a lot to shape our political fortunes. Throughout our contemporary history, the spoken word has been so important in our political life, that not only is free speech enshrined in the constitution; care has also been taken to integrate speaking regulations within governance forums, from parliamentary discourse, through discourse in the law courts, to executive discourse at cabinet meetings, and to presidential discourses of engagement
Kenya election: Tense wait for Kenyatta and Odinga
Uhuru Kenyatta retains a significant lead in Kenya's closely fought presidential election but it is not clear whether he will pass the 50% threshold to win outright. With 80% of constituencies declared, Mr Kenyatta has 49.9% of the vote, against 43.7% for Prime Minister Raila Odinga. After four days of anxious waiting, election chief James Oswago said the results would be finalised on Friday.