By the middle of July, the nation expects its sovereign Parliament to debate and vote on the constitutional amendment intended to change the date for holding general elections in Ghana from December 7 to November 7. Since, 1992, when the presidential election was held in November, all subsequent ones were held on December 7. The bill needs both Parliamentary Majority and Minority to agree in order to become law.

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In recent months, political parties in Ghana including the New Patriotic Party (NPP), the Convention People’s Party (CPP), the Progressive People’s Party, religious groups, the media and civil society groups such as the Let My Vote Count Alliance have made the case for urgent and honest electoral reform in the lead up to the November 2016 elections.

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Voter Validation is an exercise aimed at cleaning up the voter register, and is considered to be the only feasible solution at this stage, as a lesser alternative to compiling a whole new register.  The Electoral Commission’s Panel of Experts, the team tasked with making recommendations to Mrs Charlotte Osei and the EC leadership on how to get a credible register for 2016, has told the EC to carry out Validation, because it is at the moment the most viable option for a credible election.

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Pro –opposition Think Tank, the Danquah Institute says the Electoral Commission (EC’s) decision to use de-duplication processes to rid the voters register of multiple registration will do very little to make the current voters register credible.

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Verification and Validation Issues in Electronic Voting
Electronic democracy (e-democracy) is a necessity in this era of computers and information technology. Electronic election (e-election) is one of the most important applications of e-democracy, because of the importance of the voters’ privacy and the possibility of frauds. Electronic voting (e-voting) is the most significant part of e-election, which refers to the use of computers or computerised voting equipment to cast ballots in an election. Due to the rapid growth of computer technologies and advances in cryptographic techniques, e-voting is now an applicable alternative for many non-governmental elections. However, security demands become higher when voting takes place in the political arena. Click here for full report
In a provocative lecture delivered to Pennsylvania University students and professors last Monday (on the eve of Founder's Day in Ghana), Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko described Ghana's first President as the "personification of the African tragedy of the 20th century." He said, it was ironic, but pregnant with subconscious meaning that BBC listeners voted Kwame Nkrumah as Africa's man of the Millennium in December 1999.
In the highly volatile world of oil and gas contracting, the common law principle that all contracts entered into should be performed in good faith, often finds itself threatened by attempts by host governments to re-negotiate contracts, and in more severe cases, attempts at expropriation or nationalisation. The basis on which states are able to do this almost unflinchingly is the international law concept of State Sovereignty. One of the ways by which international oil companies have sought cover against such situations is by the inclusion of stabilization clauses (in whatever shape or form) in international oil agreements. How can Ghana ensure that, unlike the controversies in the mining sector, the stabilisation clauses in oil contracts strike a proper balance between investor interest and national interest?
Police Must Prosecute Corrupt EC/STL Officials Statement by LMVCA
Ladies and Gentlemen, let me add a few words to the erudite case just made for scrapping the current register and compiling a new one for the 2016 polls.
How can one define a ‘democratic election procedure’ in the light of proposals to introduce Remote Voting by Electronic Mean s (RVEM)? Are there any general characteristics of an election procedure which define it as democratic?The central question is quite separate fr om ‘how can one define a democracy?’ A crude definition of a democracy is a state in which the rulers are chosen by the people and exercise power with their consent. 1 More sophisticated definitions require, at least, a definition of ‘people’ , ‘ruler’, ‘power’ and ‘consen t’ and it would seem that a number of politically acceptable definitions of each of these terms exist in the world or even within a single polity. For example, there is no single defi nition of ‘people’ in the United Kingdom which takes into accoun t the different groups who may, or may not, vote for representatives in the various tiers of local government, the Westminster Parliament, the Scottish Parliament, th e Welsh Assembly, the Northern Ireland Assembly and the European Parliament. 2. Within the electorates for those bodies there are a number of differing qualifications to be registered as a voter and the methods of election differ one from another. Read More >>>
China’s oil trade with Africa is dominated by an opaque syndicate
WHEN the man likely to become China’s next president meets an African oil executive, you would expect the dauphin to dominate the dealmaker. Not, though, with Manuel Vicente. On April 15th this year the chairman and chief executive of Sonangol, Angola’s state oil firm, strode into a room decorated with extravagant flowers in central Beijing and shook hands with Xi Jinping, the Chinese vice-president and probable next general secretary of the Communist Party. Mr Vicente holds no official rank in the Angolan government and yet, as if he were conferring with a head of state, Mr Xi reassured his guest that China wants to “strengthen mutual political trust”. more>>>
AFRICOM
Furthermore, the U.S. is, understandably, bent on establishing a regional command for Africa, similar to U.S. Forces Korea, with a homeport situated on the African continent to protect their interests. West Africa is its natural home, given the need to protect energy interests in the Gulf of Guinea. Liberia has offered but simply cannot match the kind of convenience available in Ghana. It can be a win-win situation.AFRICOM can protect U.S. investments in our region. But, those investments (regardless of our percentage share of ownership) are also fundamentally our investments – and thus the assistance in their protection will be a welcome boon. U.S. military presence can also help improve the level of military professionalism of our already well-respected troops. It is interesting to note that in the six decades since World War II in which America has maintained a military presence in other sovereign nations, none of the host nations has suffered instability or military takeovers, as the presence of U.S. troops helps entrench the subordination of soldiers to civil leadership. Moreover the presence of U.S. troops boosts social and economic activities in the host countries, too.
Transcript of President Mills' Radio Gold interview on Radio Gold, Friday, Dec 23:
Let me say that at the very beginning I wasn’t going to talk about this case because having referred to EOCO I would regard it to be sub-judice. But I want to say one or two things. When this case first broke, I was in the US and I ordered the two ministries involved, at the Attorney General’s Department and the Finance Ministry, to give me a report, a report which I wanted to be published so that the world would know what happened.
Ghana seeks 40-year plan binding successive governments
Ghana's national development planning commission has begun preparations for developing a 40-year plan that seeks to outdo political, ethnic and geographical aspirations of the country, and to bind successive political leaders to following its implementation.
The Electoral Commission has said it is embarking on a nationwide kit swapping exercise for areas that reported faulty equipment in the ongoing biometric voter registration exercise. There have been several reports of faulty computers, cameras and batteries across the country since the exercise began on Saturday.