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Once again, the President has proven to the citizenry, that he is the leader who is determined to lead the country on the trajectory of socio-economic transformation, personal liberties and economic freedoms. Addressing the media at the Jubilee House, the Presidential Seat, on 18th July, 2017, he made it clear of his resolve and drive to bequeath to the current and successive generations, a very robust economy and a prosperous nation. As has been the custom of previous presidents of the country over the years, especially under the Fourth Republic, the President, who was overwhelmingly, voted into office by the electorate in the December 7 polls, and also a firm believer in responsible governance, rendered an account of his stewardship to the people.

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Dr. Kingsley Nyarko is a Senior Lecturer at the Psychology Department, an adjunct of the Centre for Ageing Studies, and the Foundation Head of the Department of Teacher Education, School of Education and Leadership of the University of Ghana. He obtained his Bachelor of Education degree at the University of Cape-Coast, and both his Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. D.) degrees in Psychology and Educational Psychology respectively from the University of Munich, Germany. He has worked in internationally reputable organisations and serves on several boards and committees in the academia and corporate world. He is also an external examiner of the Department of Educational Foundations—University of Cape-Coast, internal examiner (Masters and Ph. D) at the University of Ghana, and a former visiting lecturer of GIMPA Business School and the University of Education (Kumasi campus).

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Good afternoon ladies and Gentlemen of the press. Thank you for coming on such short notice.

There’s a Ghanaian saying which goes like” Obaa a onim s3 onky3 wo aware ase no, otu bankye aa, ondua” akin to saying literally; that a lady whose days in her marital home are numbered, does not bother to re-plant uprooted cassava. 

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Other Stories

OBAMA’S VISIT – WHAT’S IN IT FOR US AND U.S.?
Abstract This article argues that in the excitement surrounding President Obama’s July visit to Ghana, what has been missing is an analysis of what is in it for the United States, an understanding of which is crucial for Ghana if it is to capitalise on the immense opportunity provided by this trip.Highlighting the significance of the deepwater oil find in 2007, the article sets out why Ghana is now the subject of strategic U.S. energy and military interests which, as far as the Obama administration is concerned, has raised the stakes considerably in Ghana–United States relations. As the potential gem in the crown of what Washington terms Africa's ‘New Gulf’, the article highlights how Ghana’s pending oil-rich status will shift the terms of negotiation during the trip.
The Monetary Policy Committee - November 2013
You are welcome to this Press briefing. The Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) held its 58th meeting on November 25 to 27, 2013 to review the latest economic developments and the monetary policy stance. I present to you the outcome of the deliberations. The latest projections by the IMF indicate a pickup in the pace of global activity from 2.9 percent in 2013 to 3.6 percent in 2014, driven largely by the advanced economies with the impulse to global growth expected to come mainly from the United States against weaker prospects in emerging market economies.
Some Thoughts From Gabby On The Election Petition
The respondents in Ghana’s presidential election petition are, in short, saying, “Yes, we admit there were irregularities, but, whatever they are, whether over-voting, unknown polling stations or voting without biometric verification, they must be seen as nothing more than clerical, administrative or transpositional errors which must not affect votes cast by Ghanaians.”
Status Of Electoral Reform In Ghana
In recent months, political parties including the New Patriotic Party (NPP) and the Convention People’s Party (CPP) and civil society groups such as the Let My Vote Count Alliance have made the case for urgent electoral reform in the lead up to the November 2016 elections.
Ghana loses $1bn a year in petroleum revenue
The Executive Director of the Danquah Institute, Gabby Otchere-Darko, has stated that industry experts estimate that every day that Ghana either flares gas or is unable to utilise the associated natural gas from Jubilee for power translates into $1.2 million a day in lost revenue. “This means that for this year the avoidable delays in the development of the gas infrastructure will cost the country a minimum of $638 million”, Gabby said.
The Let My Vote Count Alliance has taken due notice of the decision by President John Dramani Mahama to appoint Mrs. Charlotte Osei, 42, as Chairperson of the Electoral Commission (EC) of Ghana. We wish to greet her with this clarion message: NO NEW REGISTER NO VOTE IN 2016!
Is the Constitutional Review Commission Constitutional?
Two USA based Ghanaian constitutional scholars have questioned the constitutionality of the on-going constitutional review exercise. In an article to appear in African Journal of International and Comparative Law, the scholars argue that (i) the President has no power to appoint a commission to review the Constitution; (ii) only Parliament has the power to amend the Constitution; (iii) that any and all initiatives to amend the Constitution must originate from parliament; and (iv) a wholesale review of the Constitution by a Commission, as is currently being done, is alien to the Constitution. The scholars conclude that the current constitutional review exercise set a dangerous precedent and, therefore, calls for the immediate dissolution of the Constitutional Review Commission (CRC). more >>>
In Summary This article offers five reasons for this conclusion: Supreme Court’s reliance on backward looking, mean-spirited, cramped Nigerian precedent. Tolerant and uncritical acceptance of the IEBC’s explanations on the voter registers. Lack of clarity about IEBC’s duty to ensure that final results could be verified against provisional results. The Court’s use of subsidiary legislation to limit the meaning of “votes cast,” an unambiguous phrase in the Constitution. The evidential foreclosure that the Court imposes on itself by taking judicial notice of technology failures instead of treating IEBC as spurious. Sadly, as the saying is, in this judgment, the Supreme Court has only given us reasons that sound good, not good, sound reasons. Read More >>>
Critical News: What happened to Us?
It is over. With a finality that left us numb and confused, Thursday morning, prepped for the 10am start, like many other Ghanaians I had a good breakfast with family, our mindsets tuned to a historical upheaval of one sort or another and we weren’t disappointed. We had a historical event, it ended so quickly even the Petitioners and Respondent lawyers did not understand the verdict. Watching aghast, both sides tried to digest the decision, neither the NDC nor the NPP realizing it was over. So not seeing the NPP roaring a win, the NDC figured they had won and started waving white handkerchiefs. Were Ghanaians disappointed? What happened to us? Accra went mute, Kumasi shut down, Takoradi just closed shop and the NDC party itself could only celebrate at their Headquarters. The streets went silent and traffic flowed in an uneasy stream, reflecting Ghanaians’ response to the judgment.
Is The President Committing Treason?
There is little doubt that Kennedy Agyapong's statement calling on ashantis to "beat ewes and gas" is incendiary, indefensible, inexcusable and deserving of condemnation by all well meaning people. Having said that, I will also add that, as abominable as the statement is, it does not give the government the power to detain Agyapong, on trumped up charges in clear retaliation for exposing the President's role in the Woyome saga. Our Constitution does not just protect love-speech. Indeed, love-speech requires no protection at all. What the Constitution really protects is ugly speech, such as those uttered by the misguided Kennedy Agyapong. If speech does not lead to imminent danger, it must be protected, even if it highly offensive.