No society has been able to sustainably develop its human and physical resources to affect the most of its people without a strong values system. The competition of Ideas they say are the vehicles of transformation but even that requires values to guide it. The Danquah Institute recognizes that a society without values is one in retrogression.  The Institute therefore places high premium on the interactions and exposures that help to build confident and patriotic citizens with integrity.

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 There are growing concerns over the quality of politics in Ghana. Why people choose to support particular political parties. What motivates allegiances and how all that can affect the nature of our democracy and the general good that society benefits from it.

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Credible information available to the New Statesman indicates that the Electoral Commission has prepared a budget of $230 million for a possible compilation of a new biometric voters register for the 2016 general elections.

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There is little time for Mr Mahama and the NDC to turn the economy around before the December 2016 presidential and legislative elections.

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Other Stories

Press Release: Bank of Ghana’s response to allegations of illegal money transfers into Ghana
The attention of the Bank of Ghana has been drawn to reports in the media about illegal money transfer activities. The Daily Graphic of August 11, 2011 carries a story to the effect that the Bank of Ghana, the regulatory authority, did not appear to be attaching the requisite relevance and urgency to the growing threat of unregistered foreign exchange transactions to the nation’s balance of payments and finances. Another story in the Daily Guide, also of August 11, 2011 under the caption ‘Money Laundering booms’ reached a similar conclusion with advice to the Bank of Ghana to proactively promote the operations of formal transfer methods and act against illegal methods as well as consider allowing MTOs to transmit money out of Ghana as a solution to the growing menace.
Press Release: The Philippines Hold Successful Elections with E-Voting
There is no such thing anywhere in the world as perfect election arrangement, but if democracy in Africa is tosucceed then it requires solutions to the basic instruments of rigging which undermine it. The problems which led to the disenfranchisement of hundreds of UK voters during the May 6 general elections attest to that. Hints from the head of UK’s electoral commission point to future reforms involving election automation technology. Last year, India, a developing nation, showed that electronic voting is the best way forward for democracies around the world. The Danquah Institute believes that the Philippines on Monday, May 10, made an even stronger case for Ghana to consider seriously the proposals to introduce e-voting here. more >>>
Can Oil Succeed where Gold Failed Ghanaians?
It is easier to be pessimistic about Ghanaians feeling the prosperous benefits of our new found wealth, oil, than to be optimistic. Anticipatory democracy, in the Ghanaian sense, has seen many Ghanaians redirecting their expectations of a better tomorrow to the Jubilee Fields offshore. The news today is that the Floating Production & Storage Offshore has been commissioned and on the high seas to Ghana. Production may begin before the end of the year. Though, Parliament is yet to pass any of the new general oil and gas legal and policy framework legislations since the 2007 oil discovery, there are assurances from Government that the Bills are ready for parliamentary consideration. more >>>
President Obama’s Shadow on Ghana’s Elections
Ghana was the first sub-Saharan African country U.S. President Barak Obama visited in July 2009. He selected Ghana because it was a “model of good governance, democracy and strong civil society participation.” Kenyans were miffed that he did not visit his fatherland and the Nigerians smelled a rat: That his visit to Ghana was an insipid conspiracy to destabilize Nigeria. But Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka disagreed: A visit by Obama would have sanctified the putrid mess called Nigeria. He threatened to have Obama stoned if he stepped foot in the country. Mercifully, President Obama wasn’t stoned in Ghana.
OBAMA’S VISIT – WHAT’S IN IT FOR US AND U.S.?
Abstract This article argues that in the excitement surrounding President Obama’s July visit to Ghana, what has been missing is an analysis of what is in it for the United States, an understanding of which is crucial for Ghana if it is to capitalise on the immense opportunity provided by this trip.Highlighting the significance of the deepwater oil find in 2007, the article sets out why Ghana is now the subject of strategic U.S. energy and military interests which, as far as the Obama administration is concerned, has raised the stakes considerably in Ghana–United States relations. As the potential gem in the crown of what Washington terms Africa's ‘New Gulf’, the article highlights how Ghana’s pending oil-rich status will shift the terms of negotiation during the trip.
Bernard Anbataayela Mornah vs The Attorney-General
The plaintiff has brought this action invoking the origional jurisdiction of this court The reliefs sought are: i, A declaration that on a true and proper interpretation of Articles 133, 157, 93(2) and 11 of the 1992 Constitution, Rule 71B and part of Rule 69C(5) of the Supreme Court (Amendment) Rules, 2012(C.I.74) are unconstitutional and must be declared null and void of no effect. ii, Any consequential orders the Supreme Court may deem meet Readmore >>
Biometrics in Elections
This report is a result of a brief consultancy on behalf of IFES Georgia with financial support courtesy of USAID. The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author and should not be attributed to neither IFES nor USAID. The consultancy took place over four days in the period 25 to 28 January 2011 in Tbilisi, Georgia. Click here for full report
Reconsider the 4-Year Senior High School
The theory of evolution by Charles Darwin teaches us about natural selection—i.e. survival of the fitters. We can survive as a nation when we have established a strong and solid educational system. It is a solid educational system that can deliver the country from abject poverty to economic freedom. It is a shame to witness the way we address issues of education in the country. It appears populism and political showdown have been the rationale behind addressing educational issues in the country instead of allowing ourselves to be informed by evidence on the ground.
Why Mugabe should not have been at Copenhagen
That Robert Mugabe should lead an entourage of sixty Zimbabwean technocrats on an expensive frolic to participate in discussions on global warming in Copenhagen is a grave travesty of justice. How a man under ‘EU sanctions’ can evade arrest for crimes against ‘nature and humanity’ is only explainable by the mysterious world of United Nations protocol. Moreover, though the general position is that African and G77 countries are the least offenders in carbon dioxide emission, there is critical evidence to prove that Mugabe’s violent ten-year land grab has been responsible for desertification of previously arable commercial farmland.
Africa Rising: Jeffrey Sachs says Ghana's future looks bright
Because of good governance in the past, and now oil production, Ghana is likely to reach all of the Millennium Development Goals toward ending extreme poverty and child mortality. As the small West African nation of Ghana heads into an election year, fierce debate on whether the government of President John Mills has delivered on its developmental goals and promises is already raging. But one of the world’s most prominent development economists says Ghana is proving to be one of the strongest performers on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in Africa and unlike some of its African counterparts is likely to fulfill them by the 2015 deadline.