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Newsflash

  • COMMEMORATION OF THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DEATH OF DR. J. B. DANQUAH -

  • Foresight Africa: Implementing a New U.S.-Africa Policy -

    2013 ushered in the most significant change in the United States’ Africa policy since the passing of PEPFAR 10 years ago. The unveiling of investment-focused initiatives—Power Africa and Trade Africa—reflects not just a change in how the Obama administration views the continent, but also how foreign investors have prioritized it. But policy rarely achieves its objectives without equal attention to implementation. A number of implementation barriers—old regulations and new policies working at cross-purposes, and limited on-the-ground capacity—threaten to undermine America’s new approach to the continent in 2014. If 2013 was marked by change in U.S. strategy towards Africa, 2014 will be marked by the recognition that 90 percent of the success of that strategy is implementation.

  • Statistical Proof of Ghana's Bloated Voter Register -

    This is the Age Distribution of Ghana’s 2010 population of 24.391 million.

    This number includes all persons domiciled in Ghana as at 2010 regardless of citizenship.

    Although the elections were held in 2012, the voter register was compiled at a time when these were the population distribution

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  • NPA’s 10% reduction in Petroleum Prices – “Too Little” or “Too Late”? -

    NPA’s Arrogance or Economics?

    On the eve of the New Year, 2015, the National Petroleum Authority (NPA) announced a reduction in ex-pump prices of petroleum products by 10% across board. This was not without drama. Most of the headlines that followed the announcement pointed to price reduction under duress. A number of civil society organizations and political parties put pressure on NPA to reduce the prices due to reasons such as the oil price crush and relative stability in the value of the local Ghanaian currency. Some of the organizations threatened public demonstrations against NPA and the Government; a situation that was expected considering that petro-politics is a feature of petroleum pricing in most parts of the world.

  • NDC RIGGING MACHINERY IN MOTION …. as DI raises red flags over suspicious NHIS registration numbers -

    Public policy and governance think tank, the Danquah Institute has expressed grave concern about the Electoral Commission's decision to register all persons in the country who, simply, are in possession of identity cards issued by the National Health Insurance Authority.

    At a press conference organised by DI last week, a fellow of the institute, Mr. Boakye Agyarko, explained that “one of the objects of the National Health Insurance Authority” as captured on the NHIA’s website which states that “persons not resident in the country but who are on a visit to this country” can obtain NHIS cards is deeply worrying.

  • GHANA MUST WAKE UP, SHOUT FOR A NEW REGISTER AND SHAKE UP THE EC -

    FITCH Rating’s latest report on Ghana lays particular emphasis on the importance of Ghana’s democracy and stability to the country’s economic prospects. Whiles it gives a negative outlook based on how the economy is being run, Fitch makes the point that Ghana’s credit rating has not, however, fallen below ‘B’ because of the country’s “strong governance record and recent democratic history,” and that, this is “reflected in Ghana’s ability to attract foreign direct investment, which at 7% of GDP is well above that of Nigeria, Gabon, Zambia, Kenya and Angola.”

  • Danquah Institute Reacts to Bogus Polls On NPP General Secretary Race -

    The attention of the Danquah Institute has been drawn to a story making the rounds on social media and now on www.ghanaweb.com, as well, titled “Danquah Institute predicts 64.7% win for Kwabena Agyepong.”

  • The Monetary Policy Committee - November 2013 -

    You are welcome to this Press briefing. The Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) held its 58th meeting on November 25 to 27, 2013 to review the latest economic developments and the monetary policy stance. I present to you the outcome of the deliberations.

    The latest projections by the IMF indicate a pickup in the pace of global activity from 2.9 percent in 2013 to 3.6 percent in 2014, driven largely by the advanced economies with the impulse to global growth expected to come mainly from the United States against weaker prospects in emerging market economies.

  • Africa’s tax systems: progress, but what is the next generation of reforms? -

    Mick MooreTaxation is zipping up the development agenda, but the discussion is often focussed on international aspects such as tax havens or the Robin Hood Tax. Both very important, but arguably, even more important is what happens domestically – are developing country tax systems regressive or progressive? Are they raising enough cash to fund state services? Are they efficient and free of corruption? This absolutely magisterial overview of the state of tax systems in Africa comes from Mick Moore (right), who runs the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD). It was first published by the Africa Research Institute.

    Anglophone countries have led the way in reforming tax administration in Africa, considerably more so than their francophone peers. The reasons for this are numerous. Networks of international tax specialists are based mainly in English-speaking countries. Many of the modern systems that promote best practice within tax authorities were developed in anglophone countries, especially Australia. International donors, and particularly the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), have directly and indirectly promoted a lot of reform of national tax authorities. In fact, this has been one of the success stories of British aid.

  • TWO DECADES OF FREEDOM: What South Africa Is Doing With It, And What Now Needs To Be Done -

    As the 20th anniversary of the birth of democracy in South Africa, on April 27 2014, approaches, it seems a perfect opportunity to take a step back and get a long-range perspective on the important question: “So, what has Nelson Mandela’s South Africa done with its freedom?”

    Goldman Sachs has produced this report in the hope of contributing to- wards a more balanced narrative on South Africa; one, which in the wake of 2012’s tragic events at Marikana, had become somewhat hysterical, short-term and often negative

Ghana Lauded For Its Democratic Credentials

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Mr Ralf Wittek, Country Representative of Hanns Seidel Foundation, a based German organisation which specializes in political education, has lauded Ghana for the successes it had chalked as far as democracy on the African continent was concerned.

He also lauded the civil society for forming an integral part of Ghana’s public discussions landscape and for helping to educate the citizenry on issues of governance.
Mr Ralf Wittek, Country Representative of Hanns Seidel Foundation, a based German organisation which specializes in political education, has lauded Ghana for the successes it had chalked as far as democracy on the African continent was concerned.

He also lauded the civil society for forming an integral part of Ghana’s public discussions landscape and for helping to educate the citizenry on issues of governance.

Speaking at the 5th edition of ‘Project Citizen Ghana’, a civic education programme, organized by the National Commission for Civic Education (NCCE), for first and second cycles institutions in the country, Mr Wittek, however expressed concern about some political decisions which do not reflect national interest.

“It is sad to find out that some political decisions do not always reflect the collective interest of Ghanaians and also most of the youth do not seem to be sufficiently informed about their political rights and how they could influence decisions”, he explained.

He expressed satisfaction for partnering with the NCCE in an effort to engage the youth in identifying and coming out with solutions to issues that are of major concern to the society as a whole.

“By dealing with problems in the community and designing an action plan, the participating students do not only learn about the laws of the nation and public policies, but also the need to take initiative and the responsibility to cause a change”, he added.

Mr Wittek said so far, over 3,000 students from 147 schools, including two schools for the blind and three schools for the deaf had participated in the ‘Project Citizen Ghana’.

The intent of Project Citizen Ghana (PCG) was to motivate and enable young people to enjoy the rights and accept the responsibilities of citizenship with participants given the free will to express their opinions and acquaint themselves with functions of government agencies.

PCG ensures that students are put in a group and encouraged to corporate with each other as they identify specific issues in their communities which need to be addressed.

Results are displayed in groups, which are presented to the relevant audience, sometimes in the form of competitions.

There were presentations from three schools including Accra Academy, Bolga Girls Senior High School and St Francis Xavier Minor Seminary, Wa.

Accra Academy gave a presentation on the poor sanitary condition at the Agbogbloshie Market, while Bolga Girls spoke on the organisation of expensive funerals in Zaare community, with St Francis speaking on the high incidence of indiscipline on the roads.

All the participating schools were presented with plagues for participating in the programmes.



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